Catalogue


The roots of English colonialism in Ireland /
John Patrick Montaño.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xiii, 426 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521198283 (hardback), 9780521198288 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
0521198283 (hardback)
9780521198288 (hardback)
contents note
Planting a landscape : cultivation and reform in Ireland -- Planning a landscape I : cultivation as reformation -- Planning a landscape II : cultivation through plantation -- Inscribing a landscape : maps, surveys and records. -- Material signs : ordering the built environment. -- A civil offer : the failure to adopt English customs. -- Bad manners, nasty habits : the elimination of Irish customs.
abstract
"This is a major new study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Montaño traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture - houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges - in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime"--
catalogue key
7933533
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 392-419) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John Patrick Montano is Professor of History at the University of Delaware.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-05-01:
Montano (Univ. of Delaware) offers an interpretative and historiographical effort that utilizes and synthesizes the productivity of many diligent scholars in diverse fields of study. His study of Tudor Ireland ranges well beyond the period to give readers a larger context of the reality of Tudor policy. Montano sees the fundamental contention between the Tudor state and the Gaelic-speaking Irish to be rooted not in politics, race, or ideology, but in agriculture. He argues that Western society has long had an antipathy for pastoral or nomadic societies that lack an order that is based on subduing and taming nature. The author's examination of this dichotomy gives numerous examples of how fundamental assumptions about society and its relation to agriculture led Tudor policy makers to a heartless single-mindedness in regard to the Gaelic-speaking Irish. Montano's work is a significant addition to the historiography of 16th-century Ireland. The book provides a critical analysis of prior contentions and offers its own concept of the dynamics of early colonialism in Ireland. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Scholars and graduate students rather than undergraduates would benefit the most from this book. K. Herlihy University of Central Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
Advance praise: 'Anyone interested in Irish history, the Elizabethan period and the origins of modern imperialism ... should read this book.' Lisa Bitel, University of Southern California
'Anyone interested in Irish history, the Elizabethan period and the origins of modern imperialism ... should read this book.' Lisa Bitel, University of Southern California
"Highly recommended. Scholars and graduate students rather than undergraduates would benefit the most from this book." -Choice
"In sum, Montano's elegant and richly-detailed book enhances an already-vibrant historical wall-hanging. Splendid production and polished prose further commend a lively account of English colonial aspirations in Ireland that will be sought out by all in the field and appreciated by anyone interested in a finely-wrought work of history." -Irish Literary Supplement
'John Patrick Montao's The Roots of English Colonialism in Ireland, like other works in Cambridge [University Press]'s series Critical Perspectives on Empire, aims to produce work that is both cognizant of postcolonial theory and grounded in empirical methodology.' Journal of British Studies
'… Montano's elegant and richly-detailed book enhances an already-vibrant historical wall-hanging. Splendid production and polished prose further commend a lively account of English colonial aspirations in Ireland that will be sought out by all in the field and appreciated by anyone interested in a finely-wrought work of history.' Irish Literary Supplement
'Montano offers an arresting, impressive and thought-provoking analysis of the underlying ideology and developing strategy by which the English conquest and colonisation of Ireland was completed in the sixteenth century ... a precedent for further colonial adventures in the Atlantic world and beyond.' Thomas Bartlett, University of Aberdeen
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This 2011 book is a major study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Montao traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture - houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges - in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime.
Main Description
This is a major new study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Monta o traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture - houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges - in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime.
Main Description
This is a major new study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Montaño traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture – houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges – in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime.
Description for Bookstore
John Montauo traces the origins of the colonial theory that lay behind the Tudor plantations in Ireland. He also explores the importance of cultural difference in justifying the civilising process through discussions of attitudes to landscape, dress, language, material culture and the ordering of the world through cartography and surveying.
Description for Bookstore
This 2011 book traces the origins of the colonial theory that lay behind the Tudor plantations in Ireland. He also explores the importance of cultural difference in justifying the civilising process through discussions of attitudes to landscape, dress, language, material culture and the ordering of the world through cartography and surveying.
Main Description
This 2011 book is a major study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Montaño traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture - houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges - in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime.
Bowker Data Service Summary
John Montaño traces the origins of the colonial theory that lay behind the Tudor plantations in Ireland. He also explores the importance of cultural difference in justifying the civilising process through discussions of attitudes to landscape, dress, language, material culture and the ordering of the world through cartography and surveying.
Description for Bookstore
John Monta o traces the origins of the colonial theory that lay behind the Tudor plantations in Ireland. He also explores the importance of cultural difference in justifying the civilising process through discussions of attitudes to landscape, dress, language, material culture and the ordering of the world through cartography and surveying.
Library of Congress Summary
"This is a major new study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Montaño traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture - houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges - in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime"--
Main Description
This is a major new study of the cultural foundations of the Tudor plantations in Ireland and of early English imperialism more generally. John Patrick Montauo traces the roots of colonialism in the key relationship of cultivation and civility in Tudor England and shows the central role this played in Tudor strategies for settling, civilising and colonising Ireland. The book ranges from the role of cartography, surveying and material culture houses, fences, fields, roads and bridges in manifesting the new order to the place of diet, leisure, language and hairstyles in establishing cultural differences as a site of conflict between the Irish and the imperialising state and as a justification for the civilising process. It shows that the ideologies and strategies of colonisation which would later be applied in the New World were already apparent in the practices, material culture and hardening attitude towards barbarous customs of the Tudor regime.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
List of abbreviationsp. xii
Introduction: nature is a languagep. 1
Planting a landscape: cultivation and reform in Irelandp. 22
Planning a landscape I: cultivation as reformationp. 64
Planning a landscape II: cultivation through plantationp. 103
Inscribing a landscape: maps, surveys, and recordsp. 154
Material signs: ordering the built environmentp. 213
A civil offer: the failure to adopt English customsp. 282
Bad manners, nasty habits: the elimination of Irish customsp. 335
Conclusionp. 386
Bibliographyp. 392
Indexp. 420
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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