Catalogue


Fluid mechanics [electronic resource] : an introduction to the theory of fluid flows /
F. Durst.
edition
[English ed.].
imprint
Berlin : Springer, c2008.
description
xviii, 723 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
ISBN
3540713425 (hbk.), 9783540713425 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
author
imprint
Berlin : Springer, c2008.
isbn
3540713425 (hbk.)
9783540713425 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7922239
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-05-01:
Durst (FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) takes a fresh, rigorous look at fluid mechanics. Although the materials are readily available in a multitude of excellent books for academic curricula, Durst manages to cover in a modest volume a wide spectrum of topics including incompressible and compressible flows, gas dynamics, heat transfer, numerical solutions, flows of small and large Reynolds numbers, turbulence, and fluid-flow measurements. It is impossible not to notice Durst's effective and elucidating style based on years of classroom and research experience. He begins with a sweeping introduction to mathematics necessary to fluid mechanics, including tensor algebra, and then engages the reader in a variety of topics by developing the conservation laws in the appropriate coordinates, including rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical systems. Each chapter appears self-contained as Durst effectively provides the necessary theory, which is unfolded in sufficient detail and coupled with generous graphical explanations. This book would be ideal in class had Durst considered adding practice problems in each chapter. Nevertheless, the volume will be valuable for graduate students pursuing fluid mechanics research. It provides thorough analytical coverage of a wide range of fluid mechanics topics and offers brief introductions to numerical and experimental topics. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. R. N. Laoulache University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Reviews
Review Quotes
From the reviews:"Durst … cover in a modest volume a wide spectrum of topics including incompressible and compressible flows, gas dynamics, heat transfer, numerical solutions, flows of small and large Reynolds numbers, turbulence, and fluid-flow measurements. … the volume will be valuable for graduate students pursuing fluid mechanics research. It provides thorough analytical coverage of a wide range of fluid mechanics topics and offers brief introductions to numerical and experimental topics. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections." (R. N. Laoulache, Choice, Vol. 46 (9), May, 2009)Based on the German edition from year 2006, the translated English edition was presented in 2008. It contains 21 chapters. … The book gives a comprehensive survey of the large field of fluid dynamics. It is very useful for students in engineering and physics. (Bernd Platzer, Zeitschrift für Angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik, Vol. 90 (12), 2010)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Fluid mechanics is a field that spreads widely and to all fields of engineering, science and medicine. The book takes this into account and provides a sound basis. This is a modern book on fluid mechanics that is written in a way needed these days to teach the subject to students in engineering and science at higher educational institutes. The book is well structured for this purpose and is arranged in a logical teaching sequence of chapters. It is starting with an introductory chapter that contains also the summary of the history of fluid mechanics. In two chapters the basic knowledge in mathematics and physics is summarized to provide the background information needed by the students to enter the fluid mechanics. Kinematics of fluid motion is briefly described followed by the complete derivations of the differential form of the continuity and momentum equations, as well as the mechanical and thermal form of the energy equation. Subjects like hydrostatics, similarity theory, potential flows, gas dynamics etc. are treated in an introductory way to lead the students into fluid mechanics. The t_ij terms are introduced to describe the molecular momentum transport and their complete derivation is given by looking at the basis of molecular motions like that in an ideal gas. Subjects like one-dimensional viscous flows, stationary and in stationary, are treated to give the students an introduction into laminar flows. Wave motions in fluids, low Reynolds number flows, high Reynolds number flows and flows with heat transfer are treated to permit the students to get introductory treatments of important parts of fluid mechanics. Introductions are also provided into numerical computations of flows, into turbulence, as well as into measuring techniques as applied in fluid mechanics. In this way, the entire theory and practise of fluid mechanics is treated in the book, providing the student with information needed for more advanced books in specialized subjects of fluid flow treatments. Advancements of fluid flow measuring techniques and of computational methods have led to new ways to treat laminar and turbulent flows. These methods are extensively used these days in research and engineering practise. This also requires new ways to teach the subject to students at higher educational institutions in an introductory manner. The book provides the knowledge to students in engineering and natural science they need to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields. Analytical treatments are provided based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Introductions are also given into numerical and experimental methods applied to flows. The main benefit the reader will derive from the book is a sound introduction into fluid mechanics with introductions into subfields that are of interest to engineering and science. TWM Brief Market Research Report Advanced Fluid Mechanics Market Size Estimate 5,100 Market Leaders:1) White - Viscous Flow 2/e, '06 (McGraw-Hill) 1,300 25%2) Kundu/Cohen - Fluid Mechanics 3/e, '05 (Elsevier) 1,000 20%3) Panton - Incompressible Flow 3/e '05 (Wiley) 900 18%4) Currie - Fund Mechanics of Fluids, '03 (CRC) 450 9% Note: This is more of an advanced cluster of advanced fluid mechanics courses than a single market.
Main Description
This book begins with an introductory chapter summarizing the history of fluid mechanics. It then moves on to the essential mathematics and physics needed to understand and work in fluid mechanics. Analytical treatments are based on the Navier-Stokes equations.
Back Cover Copy
Advancements of fluid flow measuring techniques and of computational methods have led to new ways to treat laminar and turbulent flows. These methods are extensively used these days in research and engineering practise. This also requires new ways to teach the subject to students at higher educational institutions in an introductory manner. The book provides the knowledge to students in engineering and natural science needed to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields. Analytical treatments are provided, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Introductions are also given into numerical and experimental methods applied to flows.The main benefit the reader will derive from the book is a sound introduction into all aspects of fluid mechanics covering all relevant subfields.
Main Description
Fluid mechanics embraces engineering, science, and medicine. This book's logical organization begins with an introductory chapter summarizing the history of fluid mechanics and then moves on to the essential mathematics and physics needed to understand and work in fluid mechanics. Analytical treatments are based on the Navier-Stokes equations. The book also fully addresses the numerical and experimental methods applied to flows. This text is specifically written to meet the needs of students in engineering and science. Overall, readers get a sound introduction to fluid mechanics.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Fluid mechanics is a field that spreads widely and to all fields of engineering, science and medicine. The book takes this into account and provides a sound basis. It provides students in engineering and natural science with the knowledge they need to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields.
Table of Contents
Introduction, Importance and Development of Fluid Mechanicsp. 1
Fluid Flows and their Significancep. 1
Sub-Domains of Fluid Mechanicsp. 4
Historical Developmentsp. 9
Referencesp. 14
Mathematical Basicsp. 15
Introduction and Definitionsp. 15
Tensors of Zero Order (Scalars)p. 16
Tensors of First Order (Vectors)p. 17
Tensors of Second Orderp. 21
Field Variables and Mathematical Operationsp. 23
Substantial Quantities and Substantial Derivativep. 26
Gradient, Divergence, Rotation and Laplace Operatorsp. 27
Line, Surface and Volume Integralsp. 29
Integral Laws of Stokes and Gaussp. 31
Differential Operators in Curvilinear Orthogonal Coordinatesp. 32
Complex Numbersp. 36
Axiomatic Introduction to Complex Numbersp. 37
Graphical Representation of Complex Numbersp. 38
The Gauss Complex Number Planep. 39
Trigonometric Representationp. 39
Stereographic Projectionp. 41
Elementary Functionp. 42
Referencesp. 47
Physical Basicsp. 49
Solids and Fluidsp. 49
Molecular Properties and Quantities of Continuum Mechanicsp. 51
Transport Processes in Newtonian Fluidsp. 55
General Considerationsp. 55
Pressure in Gasesp. 58
Molecular-Dependent Momentum Transportp. 62
Molecular Transport of Heat and Mass in Gasesp. 65
Viscosity of Fluidsp. 69
Balance Considerations and Conservation Lawsp. 73
Thermodynamic Considerationsp. 76
Referencesp. 81
Basics of Fluid Kinematicsp. 83
General Considerationsp. 83
Substantial Derivativesp. 84
Motion of Fluid Elementsp. 85
Path Lines of Fluid Elementsp. 86
Streak Lines of Locally Injected Tracersp. 90
Kinematic Quantities of Flow Fieldsp. 94
Stream Lines of a Velocity Fieldp. 94
Stream Function and Stream Lines of Two-Dimensional Flow Fieldsp. 98
Divergence of a Flow Fieldp. 101
Translation, Deformation and Rotation of Fluid Elementsp. 104
Relative Motionsp. 108
Referencesp. 112
Basic Equations of Fluid Mechanicsp. 113
General Considerationsp. 113
Mass Conservation (Continuity Equation)p. 115
Newton's Second Law (Momentum Equation)p. 119
The Navier-Stokes Equationsp. 123
Mechanical Energy Equationp. 128
Thermal Energy Equationp. 130
Basic Equations in Different Coordinate Systemsp. 135
Continuity Equationp. 135
Navier-Stokes Equationsp. 136
Special Forms of the Basic Equationsp. 142
Transport Equation for Vorticityp. 143
The Bernoulli Equationp. 144
Crocco Equationp. 146
Further Forms of the Energy Equationp. 147
Transport Equation for Chemical Speciesp. 150
Referencesp. 151
Hydrostatics and Aerostaticsp. 153
Hydrostaticsp. 153
Connected Containers and Pressure-Measuring Instrumentsp. 163
Communicating Containersp. 163
Pressure-Measuring Instrumentsp. 166
Free Fluid Surfacesp. 168
Surface Tensionp. 168
Water Columns in Tubes and Between Platesp. 172
Bubble Formation on Nozzlesp. 175
Aerostaticsp. 183
Pressure in the Atmospherep. 183
Rotating Containersp. 187
Aerostatic Buoyancyp. 188
Conditions for Aerostatics: Stability of Layersp. 191
Referencesp. 192
Similarity Theoryp. 193
Introductionp. 193
Dimensionless Form of the Differential Equationsp. 197
General Remarksp. 197
Dimensionless Form of the Differential Equationsp. 199
Considerations in the Presence of Geometric and Kinematic Similaritiesp. 204
Importance of Viscous Velocity, Time and Length Scalesp. 207
Dimensional Analysis and ¿-Theoremp. 212
Referencesp. 219
Integral Forms of the Basic Equationsp. 221
Integral Form ofthe Continuity Equationp. 221
Integral Form ofthe Momentum Equationp. 224
Integral Form of the Mechanical Energy Equationp. 225
Integral Form of the Thermal Energy Equationp. 228
Applications of the Integral Form of the Basic Equationsp. 230
Outflow from Containersp. 230
Exit Velocity of a Nozzlep. 231
Momentum on a Plane Vertical Platep. 232
Momentum on an Inclined Plane Platep. 234
Jet Deflection by an Edgep. 236
Mixing Process in a Pipe of Constant Cross-Sectionp. 237
Force on a Turbine Blade in a Viscosity-Free Fluidp. 239
Force on a Periodical Blade Gridp. 240
Euler's Turbine Equationp. 242
Power of Flow Machinesp. 245
Referencesp. 247
Stream Tube Theoryp. 249
General Considerationsp. 249
Derivations of the Basic Equationsp. 251
Continuity Equationp. 251
Momentum Equationp. 253
Bernoulli Equationp. 254
The Total Energy Equationp. 256
Incompressible Flowsp. 257
Hydro-Mechanical Nozzle Flowsp. 257
Sudden Cross-Sectional Area Extensionp. 258
Compressible Flowsp. 260
Influences of Area Changes on Flowsp. 260
Pressure-Driven Flows Through Converging Nozzlesp. 263
Referencesp. 273
Potential Flowsp. 275
Potential and Stream Functionsp. 275
Potential and Complex Functionsp. 280
Uniform Flowp. 283
Corner and Sector Flowsp. 284
Source or Sink Flows and Potential Vortex Flowp. 288
Dipole-Generated Flowp. 291
Potential Flow Around a Cylinderp. 293
Flow Around a Cylinder with Circulationp. 296
SummaryofImportant Potential Flowsp. 299
Flow Forces on Bodiesp. 302
Referencesp. 307
Wave Motions in Non-Viscous Fluidsp. 309
General Considerationsp. 309
Longitudinal Waves: Sound Waves in Gasesp. 313
Transversal Waves: Surface Wavesp. 318
General Solution Approachp. 318
Plane Standing Wavesp. 323
Plane Progressing Wavesp. 325
References to Further Wave Motionsp. 329
Referencesp. 330
Introduction to Gas Dynamicsp. 331
Introductory Considerationsp. 331
Mach Lines and Mach Conep. 335
Non-Linear Wave Propagation, Formation of Shock Wavesp. 338
Alternative Forms of the Bernoulli Equationp. 341
Flow with Heat Transfer (Pipe Flow)p. 344
Subsonic Flowp. 347
Supersonic Flowp. 347
Rayleigh and Fanno Relationsp. 351
Normal Compression Shock (Rankine-Hugoniot Equation)p. 355
Referencesp. 360
Stationary, One-Dimensional Fluid Flows of Incompressible, Viscous Fluidsp. 361
General Considerationsp. 361
Plane Fluid Flowsp. 362
Cylindrical Fluid Flowsp. 363
Derivations of the Basic Equations for Fully Developed Fluid Flowsp. 364
Plane Fluid Flowsp. 364
Cylindrical Fluid Flowsp. 366
Plane Couette Flowp. 366
Plane Fluid Flow Between Platesp. 369
Plane Film Flow on an Inclined Platep. 372
Axi-Symmetric Film Flowp. 376
Pipe Flow (Hagen-Poiseuille Flow)p. 379
Axial Flow Between Two Cylindersp. 383
Film Flows with Two Layersp. 386
Two-Phase Plane Channel Flowp. 388
Referencesp. 391
Time-Dependent, One-Dimensional Flows of Viscous Fluidsp. 393
General Considerationsp. 393
Accelerated and Decelerated Fluid Flowsp. 397
Stokes First Problemp. 397
Diffusion of a Vortex Layerp. 399
Channel Flow Induced by Movements of Platesp. 402
Pipe Flow Induced by the Pipe Wall Motionp. 407
Oscillating Fluid Flowsp. 414
Stokes Second Problemp. 414
Pressure Gradient-Driven Fluid Flowsp. 417
Starting Flow in a Channelp. 417
Starting Pipe Flowp. 422
Referencesp. 427
Fluid Flows of Small Reynolds Numbersp. 429
General Considerationsp. 429
Creeping Fluid Flows Between Two Platesp. 431
Plane Lubrication Filmsp. 433
Theory of Lubrication in Roller Bearingsp. 438
The Slow Rotation of a Spherep. 443
The Slow Translatory Motion of a Spherep. 445
The Slow Rotational Motion of a Cylinderp. 451
The Slow Translatory Motion of a Cylinderp. 453
Diffusion and Convection Influences on Flow Fieldsp. 459
Referencesp. 461
Flows of Large Reynolds Numbers Boundary-Layer Flowsp. 463
General Considerations and Derivationsp. 463
Solutions of the Boundary-Layer Equationsp. 468
Flat Plate Boundary Layer (Blasius Solution)p. 470
Integral Properties of Wall Boundary Layersp. 474
The Laminar, Plane, Two-Dimensional Free Shear Layerp. 480
The Plane, Two-Dimensional, Laminar Free Jetp. 481
Plane, Two-Dimensional Wake Flowp. 486
ConvergingChannel Flowp. 489
Referencesp. 492
Unstable Flows and Laminar-Turbulent Transitionp. 495
General Considerationsp. 495
Causes of Flow Instabilitiesp. 501
Stability of Atmospheric Temperature Layersp. 502
Gravitationally Caused Instabilitiesp. 505
Instabilities in Annular Clearances Caused by Rotationp. 507
Generalized Instability Considerations (Orr-Sommerfeld Equation)p. 512
Classifications of Instabilitiesp. 517
Transitional Boundary-Layer Flowsp. 519
Referencesp. 522
Turbulent Flowsp. 523
General Considerationsp. 523
Statistical Description of Turbulent Flowsp. 527
Basics of Statistical Considerations of Turbulent Flowsp. 528
Fundamental Rules of Time Averagingp. 528
Fundamental Rules for Probability Densityp. 530
Characteristic Functionp. 537
Correlations, Spectra and Time-Scales of Turbulencep. 538
Time-Averaged Basic Equations of Turbulent Flowsp. 542
The Continuity Equationp. 543
The Reynolds Equationp. 544
Mechanical Energy Equation for the Mean Flow Fieldp. 546
Equation for the Kinetic Energy of Turbulencep. 550
Characteristic Scales of Length, Velocity and Time of Turbulent Flowsp. 553
Turbulence Modelsp. 557
General Considerationsp. 557
General Considerations Concerning Eddy Viscosity Modelsp. 560
Zero-Equation Eddy Viscosity Modelsp. 565
One-Equation Eddy Viscosity Modelsp. 573
Two-Equation Eddy Viscosity Modelsp. 576
Turbulent Wall Boundary Layersp. 578
Referencesp. 585
Numerical Solutions of the Basic Equationsp. 587
General Considerationsp. 587
General Transport Equation and Discretization of the Solution Regionp. 591
Discretization by Finite Differencesp. 595
Finite-Volume Discretizationp. 598
General Considerationsp. 598
Discretization in Spacep. 600
Discretization with Respect to Timep. 611
Treatments of the Source Termsp. 613
Computation of Laminar Flowsp. 614
Wall Boundary Conditionsp. 615
Symmetry Planesp. 615
Inflow Planesp. 615
Outflow Planesp. 615
Computations of Turbulent Flowsp. 616
Flow Equations to be Solvedp. 616
Boundary Conditions for Turbulent Flowsp. 620
Referencesp. 626
Fluid Flows with Heat Transferp. 627
General Considerationsp. 627
Stationary, Fully Developed Flow in Channelsp. 630
Natural Convection Flow Between Vertical Plane Platesp. 633
Non-Stationary Free Convection Flow Near a Plane Vertical Platep. 637
Plane-Plate Boundary Layer with Plate Heating at Small Prandtl Numbersp. 641
Similarity Solution for a Plate Boundary Layer with Wall Heating and Dissipative Warmingp. 644
Vertical Plate Boundary-Layer Flows Caused by Natural Convectionp. 647
Similarity Considerations for Flows with Heat Transferp. 649
Referencesp. 651
Introduction to Fluid-Flow Measurementp. 653
Introductory Considerationsp. 653
Measurements of Static Pressuresp. 656
Measurements of Dynamic Pressuresp. 660
Applications of Stagnation-Pressure Probesp. 662
Basics of Hot-Wire Anemometryp. 664
Measuring Principle and Physical Principlesp. 664
Properties of Hot-Wires and Problems of Applicationp. 667
Hot-Wire Probes and Supportsp. 672
Cooling Laws for Hot-Wire Probesp. 676
Static Calibration of Hot-Wire Probesp. 680
Turbulence Measurements with Hot-Wire Anemometersp. 685
Laser Doppler Anemometryp. 694
Theory of Laser Doppler Anemometryp. 694
Optical Systems for Laser Doppler Measurementsp. 701
Electronic Systems for Laser Doppler Measurementsp. 705
Execution of LDA-Measurements: One-Dimensional LDA Systemsp. 715
Referencesp. 717
Indexp. 719
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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