Catalogue


Fifteen jugglers, five believers [electronic resource] : literary politics and the poetics of American social movements /
T.V. Reed.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
description
xvi, 218 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520075218 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
isbn
0520075218 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7919420
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-212) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"An extraordinarily ambitious effort of synthesis, worthy of comparison with the synthesis attempted a decade ago by Fredric Jameson's The Political Unconscious. This book speaks in a fresh voice, a voice that clearly knows all of the most interesting thinking on the politics of culture over the past few years yet is stimulated rather than burdened by its knowledge. It will be welcomed with exhilaration by the large and ever-increasing audience for the theory and practice of cultural studies as well as, I'm convinced, by an unusually broad general readership. No one thinking about the complex relations between aesthetics and politics will be able to ignore it."--Bruce Robbins, editor of Intellectuals: Aesthetics, Politics, Academics
Flap Copy
"An extraordinarily ambitious effort of synthesis, worthy of comparison with the synthesis attempted a decade ago by Fredric Jameson'sThe Political Unconscious. This book speaks in a fresh voice, a voice that clearly knows all of the most interesting thinking on the politics of culture over the past few years yet is stimulated rather than burdened by its knowledge. It will be welcomed with exhilaration by the large and ever-increasing audience for the theory and practice of cultural studies as well as, I'm convinced, by an unusually broad general readership. No one thinking about the complex relations between aesthetics and politics will be able to ignore it."--Bruce Robbins, editor ofIntellectuals: Aesthetics, Politics, Academics
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-06:
One concern of the sociology of the arts is the social context that produces literary or artistic creations; another issue is how the same artistic creations affect social institutions. Reed's book develops both perspectives by analyzing the interrelationship between art and modern social movements. The author's central premise is that boundaries between art and politics are fictive. To demonstrate this premise, four core chapters interpret different creations or events--a collection of prose and photographs, a novel, a nonfiction novel, and a political demonstration. The cases run chronologically from the 1930s to the 1980s, even though Reed's stated concerns are with post-1960s social movements and literary criticism. The ideas in this study are provocative, but their extraction is often hard work. Even though the book is written for an advanced academic audience, its clarity could have been enhanced. Jargon often obscures important points, and where no suitable jargon exists the author creates it--non-words such as "politerature" and "dissociology" are examples. Graduate; faculty. E. J. Green; Prince George's Community College
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-09:
Combining the insights of the New Historicism, rhetorical criticism, and Fredric Jameson's definition of postmodernism and the commodification of culture, Reed makes a significant contribution to cultural poetics by problematizing the relation of aesthetics and politics. In his first chapter, he develops a ``postmodernist realism''--a strategy that transgresses conventional boundaries of textuality and representation to demonstrate the deeply political nature of contemporary literary theory and modern social movements. In subsequent chapters, Reed uses this approach to perform insightful critical readings of ``texts'' as diverse as the Gay Rights Movement, the Women's Pentagon Action, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (1989), and James Agee and Walker Evans's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men . Along with Giles Gunn's Thinking Across the American Grain ( LJ 1/92) and Fredric Jameson's Postmodernism, or The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (Duke Univ. Pr., 1991), Reed's book offers a way beyond the impasse of much contemporary cultural theory. Highly recommended for academic libraries.-- Henry L. Carrigan Jr., Westerville P.L., Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, September 1992
Choice, June 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
T.V. Reed urges an affiliation between literary theory and political action--and between political action and literary theory. What can the "new literary theory" learn from "new social movements"; and what can social activists learn from poststructuralism, new historicism, feminist theory, and neomarxism? In strikingly new interpretations of texts in four different genres--Agee and Evans'sLet Us Now Praise Famous Men, Ellison'sInvisible Man,Mailer'sArmies of the Night, and the ecofeministWomen's Pentagon Actionsof the early 1980s--Reed shows how reading literary texts for their political strategies and reading political movements as texts can help us overcome certain rhetorical traps that have undermined American efforts to combat racism, sexism, and economic inequality.
Main Description
T.V. Reed urges an affiliation between literary theory and political action--and between political action and literary theory. What can the "new literary theory" learn from "new social movements"; and what can social activists learn from poststructuralism, new historicism, feminist theory, and neomarxism? In strikingly new interpretations of texts in four different genres--Agee and Evans's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, Ellison's Invisible Man,Mailer's Armies of the Night, and the ecofeminist Women's Pentagon Actionsof the early 1980s--Reed shows how reading literary texts for their political strategies and reading political movements as texts can help us overcome certain rhetorical traps that have undermined American efforts to combat racism, sexism, and economic inequality.
Table of Contents
Preface
Literary Politics and the Poetics of Social Movementsp. 1
Aesthetics and the Overprivileged: The Politics and Ethics of Representation in Let Us Now Praise Famous Menp. 22
Invisible Movements, Black Powers: Double Vision and Trickster Politics in Invisible Manp. 58
Disrupting the Theater of War: Armies of the Night and the New Left Siege of the Pentagonp. 87
Dramatic Ecofeminism: The Women's Pentagon Action as Theater and Theoryp. 120
Toward Some Postmodernist Populisms: A Prescriptive Postscriptp. 142
Notesp. 173
Works Citedp. 199
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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