Catalogue


Fictions of authorship in late Elizabethan narratives [electronic resource] : Euphues in Arcadia /
Katharine Wilson.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006.
description
185 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
019925253X (alk. paper), 9780199252534 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006.
isbn
019925253X (alk. paper)
9780199252534 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction : 'The ironicall recreation of the reader' -- The making of Master G.H. : Gascoigne, Whetstone, Grange, and Harvey -- Strange and incredible adventures: Lyly's Euphues and Greene's Mamillia -- Greene's Glucupilica -- Knowing your place : Greene's Pandosto and Menaphon -- From Arden to America.
catalogue key
7919156
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [171]-179) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fine, well-written piece of scholarship that deserves to be read by every scholar of early modern English literature." --Sixteenth Century Journal
...reveal[s] stylistic depth beyond the sensational plots.
Wilson's book is a fine, well-written piece of scholarship that deserves to be read by every scholar of early modern English literature.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
John Lyle, Robert Greene and Thomas Lodge created the pulp fiction of the later 16th century. This text examines how these highly educated writers dealt with the constraints of mass market authorship, and replaces their often neglected narratives at the heart of Elizabethan literature.
Main Description
The sensational narratives of John Lyly, Robert Greene, and Thomas Lodge established prose fiction as an independent genre in the late sixteenth century. The texts they created are a paradoxical blend of outrageous plotting and rhetorical sophistication, high and low culture. Although their works were feverishly devoured by contemporary readers, these writers are usually only known to students as sources for Shakespearean comedy. Fictions of Authorship in Late Elizabethan Narratives re-examines some of the pamphleteers earlier critics christened the "University Wits," young professionals who exposed their education and talents to the still new and uncertain world of mass market publication. These texts chart their authors' disenchantment with the limitations of romance and of their own careers, yet they also form an alternative canon of vernacular writing, which is both self-referential and self-questioning. Shocking, unpredictable, and very engaging, these narratives provide a vivid commentary on the interface between popular taste and "English literature."
Main Description
The sensational narratives of John Lyly, Robert Greene, and Thomas Lodge established prose fiction as an independent genre in the late sixteenth century. The texts they created are a paradoxical blend of outrageous plotting and rhetorical sophistication, high and low culture. Although theirworks were feverishly devoured by contemporary readers, these writers are usually only known to students as sources for Shakespearean comedy. Fictions of Authorship in Late Elizabethan Narratives re-examines some of the pamphleteers earlier critics christened the 'University Wits', youngprofessionals who exposed their education and talents to the still new and uncertain world of mass market publication. These texts chart their authors' disenchantment with the limitations of romance and of their own careers, yet they also form an alternative canon of vernacular writing, which isboth self-referential and self-questioning. Shocking, unpredictable, and very engaging, these narratives provide a vivid commentary on the interface between popular taste and 'English literature'.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Harvey's Gascoigne
Lyly and Mamillia
Greene's Alternative Anthologies
Greene's Glucupilica
Lodge's Arden and America
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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