Catalogue


Fault-Zone properties and earthquake rupture dynamics [electronic resource] /
edited by Eiichi Fukuyama.
imprint
Burlington, MA : Academic Press, c2009.
description
xv, 308 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0123744520, 9780123744524
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
added author
imprint
Burlington, MA : Academic Press, c2009.
isbn
0123744520
9780123744524
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction for the Fault-zone Properties and Earthquake Rupture Dynamics / E. Fukuyama -- Geometry and Slip Distribution of Co-seismic Surface Ruptures Produced by the 2001 Mw 7.8 Earthquake along the Strike-slip Kunlun Fault, Northern Tibet / by A. Lin -- Aseismic-seismic Transition and Fluid Regime along Subduction Plate Boundaries and a Fossil Example from the Northern Apennines of Italy / by P. Vannucchi, F. Remitti, J. Phipps-Morgan, and G. Bettelli -- Fault Zone Structure and Deformation Processes along an Exhumed Low-angle Normal Fault: Implications for Seismic Behaviour / by C. Collettini, R.E. Holdsworth and S.A.F. Smith -- Pseudotachylytes and Earthquake Source Mechanics / by G. Di Toro. G. Pennacchioni and S. Nielsen -- The Critical Slip Distance for Seismic and Aseismic Fault Zones of Finite Width / by C. Marone, M. Cocco, E. Richardson and E. Tinti -- Scaling of Slip Weakening Distance with Final Slip during Dynamic Earthquake Rupture / by M. Cocco, E. Tinti, C. Marone and A. Piatanesi -- Rupture Dynamics on Bi-material fault and Non-linear Off-fault Damages / by T. Yamashita -- Boundary Integral Equation Method for Earthquake Rupture Dynamics / by T. Tada -- Dynamic Rupture Propagation of the 1995 Kobe, Japan, Earthquake / by E. Fukuyama.
general note
Includes index.
abstract
The dynamics of the earthquake rupture process are closely related to fault zone properties which the authors have intensively investigated by various observations in the field as well as by laboratory experiments. These include geological investigation of the active and fossil faults, physical and chemical features obtained by the laboratory experiments, as well as the seismological estimation from seismic waveforms. Earthquake dynamic rupture can now be modeled using numerical simulations on the basis of field and laboratory observations, which should be very useful for understanding earthquake rupture dynamics. Features: First overview of new and improved techniques in the study of earthquake faulting. Broad coverage. Full color Benefits: A must-have for all geophysicists who work on earthquake dynamics. Single resource for all aspects of earthquake dynamics (from lab measurements to seismological observations to numerical modelling). Bridges the disciplines of seismology, structural geology and rock mechanics. Helps readers to understand and interpret graphs and maps. Also has potential use as a supplementary resource for upper division and graduate geophysics courses.
catalogue key
7917915
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Good supplementary material for researchers and graduate students who are interested in earthquake source physics."-- Pure Applied Geophysics
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The dynamics of the earthquake rupture process are closely related to fault zone properties which the authors have intensively investigated by various observations in the field as well as by laboratory experiments.
Main Description
The authors present a multidisciplinary approach to the study of earthquake dynamics that bridges the disciplines of seismology, structural geology, and rock mechanics. The book includes comparisons of real world faulting to numerical simulations based on field and laboratory observations, which now allow earthquakes to be modeled, greatly advancing our understanding of rupture dynamics. A single resource on all aspects of earthquake repture dynamics A first overview of new and improved techniques in the study of earthquake dynamics A must-have resource for all geophysicists studying earthquake dynamics Color images Book jacket.
Main Description
The dynamics of the earthquake rupture process are closely related to fault zone properties which the authors have intensively investigated by various observations in the field as well as by laboratory experiments. These include geological investigation of the active and fossil faults, physical and chemical features obtained by the laboratory experiments, as well as the seismological estimation from seismic waveforms. Earthquake dynamic rupture can now be modeled using numerical simulations on the basis of field and laboratory observations, which should be very useful for understanding earthquake rupture dynamics. Features: * First overview of new and improved techniques in the study of earthquake faulting * Broad coverage * Full color Benefits: * A must-have for all geophysicists who work on earthquake dynamics * Single resource for all aspects of earthquake dynamics (from lab measurements to seismological observations to numerical modelling) * Bridges the disciplines of seismology, structural geology and rock mechanics * Helps readers to understand and interpret graphs and maps Also has potential use as a supplementary resource for upper division and graduate geophysics courses.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Forewordp. xiii
List of Contributorsp. xv
Introduction: Fault-Zone Properties and Earthquake Rupture Dynamicsp. 1
Geometry and Slip Distribution of Coseismic Surface Ruptures Produced by the 2001 Kunlun, Northern Tibet, Earthquakep. 15
Introductionp. 16
Tectonic Settingp. 18
Deformation Characteristics of the 2001 Coseismic Surface Rupturep. 19
Geometric Distribution and Deformational Structurep. 19
Coseismic Slip Distributionp. 24
Measurement Method of Strike-Slip Offsetp. 24
Field Observationsp. 26
Analysis of High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagesp. 28
Seismic Inversion Resultsp. 29
Discussionp. 30
Relationship between the Coseismic Surface Rupture and Preexisting Faultp. 30
Coseismic Strike-Slip Displacementp. 31
Conclusionsp. 33
Aseismic-Seismic Transition and Fluid Regime along Subduction Plate Boundaries and a Fossil Example from the Northern Apennines of Italyp. 37
Introductionp. 38
Deformation and Seismogenesis at Accretionary and Erosive Subduction Marginsp. 40
Seismogenic Zone: Definitionp. 42
Slow Slip Events and Seismic Tremorsp. 46
Seismically Produced Structuresp. 48
The Up-Dip Limit of Seismogenesis in a Fossil Erosive Subduction Channelp. 52
Subduction Channel Architecturep. 53
Subduction Channel Internal Structure: A Low-Friction Plate Boundaryp. 55
Disussion and Comparison between Erosive and Accretionary Seismogenic Zonesp. 58
Conclusions and Future Perspectivep. 59
Fault Zone Structure and Deformation Processes along an Exhumed Low-Angle Normal Fault: Implications for Seismic Behaviorp. 69
Introductionp. 70
Regional Settingp. 71
Fault Zone Architecturep. 73
Geometry and Kinematicsp. 73
Fault Rock Distribution and Microstructuresp. 75
Discussionp. 78
Fault Rock Evolutionp. 78
The Mechancial Paradox of Low-Angle Normal Faultsp. 79
A Slip Model for Low-Angle Normal Faults (Evidences That ZF Was Active as LANF)p. 80
Conclusionsp. 82
Pseudotachylytes and Earthquake Source Mechanicsp. 87
Introductionp. 87
Pseudotachylytesp. 89
Mesoscale Geometry of Pseudotachylytep. 90
Microstructures and Geochemistry in Pseudotachlytesp. 91
Temperature Estimate of Frictional Meltsp. 93
Distribution of Tectonic Pseudotachylytesp. 94
Production of Pseudotachylytesp. 95
The Role of Waterp. 99
A Natural Laboratory of an Exhumed Seismogenic Sourcep. 100
Rupture Dynamicsp. 104
Transient Stress Patternp. 104
Examples of Transient Stress Markers Observedp. 105
Dynamic Fault Strengthp. 110
Field Estimatesp. 111
Experimental Resultsp. 113
Theoretical Estimatesp. 116
Discussions and Conclusionsp. 120
A New Approach to the Study of Exhumed Pseudotachylyte-Bearing Faultsp. 123
The Critical Slip Distance for Seismic and Aseismic Fault Zones of Finite Widthp. 135
Introductionp. 136
Friction Laws and the Transition from Static to Kinetic Frictionp. 139
Contact Model for the Critical Slip Distance of Solid Surfaces and Shear Zonesp. 140
Model for a Shear Zone of Finite Thicknessp. 143
Resultsp. 146
Implications for Scaling of the Dynamic Slip Weakening Distancep. 151
Discussionp. 154
Scaling of Slip Weakening Distance with Final Slip during Dynamic Earthquake Rupturep. 163
Introductionp. 164
Rupture History from Kinematic Source Modelsp. 167
Inferring Traction, Evolutionp. 169
Measuring Dc' from Peak Slip Velocityp. 172
Measuring Dc from Inferred Traction Evolution Curvesp. 174
Scaling between Dc and Final Slipp. 179
Discussion and Concluding Remarksp. 180
Rupture Dynamics on Bimaterial Faults and Nonlinear Off-Fault Damagep. 187
Introductionp. 187
Formation of Damage Zone due to Dynamic Fault Growthp. 191
Inference about Orientation and Distribution of Secondary Fracturesp. 191
Modeling of Generation of Tensile Microfracturesp. 193
Modeling of Dynamic Generation of Mesoscopic Shear Branchesp. 195
Effects of Damage on Earthquake Rupture in a Poroelastic Mediump. 196
Rheology of Damage Zonep. 197
Fault Growth on a Bimaterial Interfacep. 199
Field Observation of Faultsp. 199
Quasi-Static Features of In-Plane Tensile Crackp. 199
Theoretical and Numerical Studies of Dynamic Fault Slipp. 199
Regularization of an Ill-Posed Problemp. 205
Poroelastic Bimaterial Effects on Fault Slipp. 206
How Much Are Earthquake Ruptures Influenced by Bimaterial Effects?p. 207
Macroscopic Parameter Affected by the Existence of Fault at Bimaterial Interfacep. 209
Concluding Remarksp. 209
Boundary Integral Equation Method for Earthquake Rupture Dynamicsp. 217
Introductionp. 217
Basic Equationsp. 218
General Descriptionp. 218
Planar Fault of Two-Dimensional Naturep. 221
Three-and Two-Dimensional Green's Functionsp. 223
Planar Fault of Three-Dimensional Naturep. 225
Regularizationp. 226
Hypersingularities in the Integration Kernelsp. 226
Planar Two-Dimensional Antiplane Faultp. 227
Planar Three-Dimensional Faultp. 228
Planar Two-Dimensional In-Plane Faultp. 231
Isolating the Instantaneous Response Termp. 232
Spatiotemporal Discretizationp. 233
Boundary Elements and Time Stepsp. 233
Discretizing the Equationsp. 234
Implicit Time-Marching Schemep. 237
Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy Condition and the Explicit Time-Marching Schemep. 237
Evaluating Discrete Integration Kernalsp. 239
Planar Two-Dimensional Antiplane Faultp. 239
Planar Two-Dimensional In-Plane Faultp. 243
Planar Three-Dimensional Faultp. 245
Interface with the Two-Dimensional Theoryp. 247
Dealing with Nonplanar Faultsp. 248
Overviewp. 248
Evaluating Discrete Intergration Kernelsp. 250
Inventory of Available Stress Response Functionsp. 252
Linear Fault Element in a Two-Dimensional Mediump. 252
Rectangular Fault Element in a Three-Dimensional Mediump. 253
Triangular Fault Element in a Three-Dimensional Mediump. 254
Numerical Modeling Studies in the Literaturep. 254
Numerical Stabilityp. 255
Related Topicsp. 256
Fracture Criterionp. 256
Formulation in the Fourier and Laplace Domainsp. 257
Displacement Discontinuity BIEMp. 258
Fault Openingp. 258
Faults in a Half-Spacep. 260
Galerkin Methodp. 262
Conclusionp. 263
Dynamic Rupture Propagation of the 1995 Kobe, Japan, Earthquakep. 269
Introductionp. 269
Computation Methodp. 272
Fault Modelp. 273
Computation Resultsp. 275
Discussion and Conclusionp. 277
List of Abbreviationsp. 285
Indexp. 289
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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