Catalogue

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Communicating identity in Italic iron age communities /
edited by Margarita Gleba and Helle W. Horsnmus.
imprint
Oxford, UK : Oxbow Books, c2011.
description
xiv, 232 p.
ISBN
1842179918 (hbk.), 9781842179918 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford, UK : Oxbow Books, c2011.
isbn
1842179918 (hbk.)
9781842179918 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7913079
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, December 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Communicating Identity in Italic Iron Age Communities' explores the many and much-varied identities of the Italic peoples of the iron age, and how specific objects, places and ideas might have been involved in generating, mediating and communicating these identities.
Long Description
Communicating Identity explores the many and much varied identities of the Italic peoples of the Iron Age, and how specific objects, places and ideas might have been involved in generating, mediating and communicating these identities. The term 'identity' here covers both the personal identities of the individuals as well as the identities of groups on various levels (political, social, gender, ethnic, religious, etc.). The inhabitants of Iron Age Italy, just like modern-day human beings, did not possess a single, fixed identity. Identity is a product of how others have defined you as well as your own individual choice. It therefore fluctuates and may be negotiated, also because it is most often a way of self-definition either to promote the membership in a group, or to disassociate from another group. The papers in this volume, a result of a symposium, which took place on 22-23 October 2008 at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, discuss these multiple identities, and explore different types of evidence in order to provide answers to a range of questions on the issues raised.
Long Description
Recent archaeological work has shown that South Italy was densely occupied at least from the Late Bronze Age, with a marked process of the development of proto-urban centres, accompanied by important technological transformations. The archaeological exploration of indigenous South Italy is a relatively recent phenomenon, thanks to the bias towards the study of Greek colonies. Therefore an assessment of processes taking place in Italic Iron Age communities is well overdue. Communicating Identity explores the many and much varied identities of the Italic peoples of the Iron Age, and how specific objects, places and ideas might have been involved in generating, mediating and communicating these identities. The term identity here covers both the personal identities of the individuals as well and the identities of groups on various levels (political, social, gender, ethnic or religious). A wide range of evidence is discussed including funerary iconography, grave offerings, pottery, vase-painting, coins, spindles and distaffs and the excavation of settlements. The methodologies used here have wider implications. The situation in the northern Black Sea region in particular has often been compared to that of southern Italy and several of the contributions compare and contrast the archaeological evidence of the two regions.
Long Description
The volume explores the many and much varied identities of the Italic peoples of the Iron Age, and how specific objects, places and ideas might have been involved in generating, mediating and communicating these identities. The term 'identity' here covers both the personal identities of the individuals as well as the identities of groups on various levels (political, social, gender, ethnic, religious, etc.). The inhabitants of Iron Age Italy, just like modern-day human beings, did not possess a single, fixed identity. Identity is a product of how others have defined you as well as your own individual choice. It therefore fluctuates and may be negotiated, also because it is most often a way of self-definition either to promote the membership in a group, or to dissociate from another group. The papers in this volume, a result of a symposium, which took place on 22-23 October 2008 at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, discuss these multiple identities, and explore different types of evidence in order to provide answers to a range of questions on the issues raised.

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