Catalogue

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Language as the site of revolt in Medieval and Early Modern England : speaking as a woman /
M.C. Bodden.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xvi, 257 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780230618763 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
9780230618763 (hardback)
contents note
The control and criminalization of women's speech -- The "imagined woman" -- Women, conversation, crime, and the courts -- The assembly of ladies : rebelling in Eden -- Code-switching : male crossing into female speech domain -- Margery Kempe : "I grab the microphone and move my body" : volatile speech, volatile bodies -- Conclusion.
abstract
"This book has two objectives: to demonstrate that, despite extensive evidence indicating a wholesale suppression of early women's speech, women were actively engaged in cultural practices and speech strategies that were both complicitous with patriarchal ideology, and yet subversive in undermining that ideology. Further, this book dissociates early women's self-expression from, solely, licentiousness by greatly expanding the scope, the consequences, and the cultural forces of early women's speech"--
catalogue key
7889265
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [219]-244) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
M. C. Bodden is an Associate Professor in English Studies and Medieval Literature at Marquette University. She is the author of The Old English Finding of the True Cross and many articles on early and late medieval authors. She has been the recipient of the British Fulbright Scholar Research Award, the Canada Council Killam Award, and the National Endowment for the Humanities Research Award.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-04-01:
Bodden (Marquette Univ.) thoroughly investigates the almost cliched idea that medieval women were judged by the kind and amount of their speech. She begins with the kind of careful archival work that so rewards the reader: she draws from court records, providing an understanding of the anxieties about women's own speech. Chapters 1 and 3 are the richest, offering as they do both a careful, intelligent theoretical approach and a host of new materials. And when Bodden turns to literature, she does not disappoint. Her reading of Margery Kempe is especially engaging, addressing not only Kempe's own boisterous rejection of the discourse of silence, but also pointing out that modern Catholics and academic critics continue the history of rejecting Kempe's attempts to speak for herself by refusing to read her as a legitimate mystic or preacher. The only place where the blend of theory and close reading falls short is in the second chapter, "The 'Imagined Woman.'" Bodden provides some excellent material on the pictorial representation of Eve and the Serpent, but her attempt to read these through Baudrillard's four orders of representation is not convincing. Despite this flaw, the study overall is powerful and worthwhile. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. A. Castaldo Widener University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Against a background of traditional patriarchal anxieties and constraints in regard to women's speech, Bodden's important new study explores the transgressive nature of women's voices, the cultural authorization of bold speech, and agency that women were able to exercise especially within the law courts and in mysticism. This insightful study will be of particular interest to scholars in Medieval and Early European Studies and Women's Studies."--Jane Tibbetts Schulenburg, Professor of History in the Department of Liberal Studies, DCS, and Medieval and Women's Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison "Bodden offers the reader a beautifully conceptualized analysis of the engendering politics of language in medieval and early modern England. In so doing, her book joins the ranks of such classics as Michel de Certeau on mystic speech and Helen Solterer on disputing women. In engaging with the serpent, she emerges as a serpent whisperer. "--Kathleen Biddick, Professor of History, Temple University
"M.C. Bodden's Language as a Site of Revolt , written in an engaging, almost coversational style, which nonetheless never suggests informatility or anything less than scholarly dedication to her subject, makes a captivating read, informative and enlightening all the way through, while handling the often heavy theoretical background also with ease." - Sixteenth Century Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This book has two objectives: to demonstrate that, despite extensive evidence indicating a wholesale suppression of early women's speech, women were actively engaged in cultural practices and speech strategies that were both complicitous with patriarchal ideology, and yet subversive in undermining that ideology. Further, this book dissociates early women's self-expression from, solely, licentiousness by greatly expanding the scope, the consequences, and the cultural forces of early women's speech.
Main Description
Language as the Site of Revolt in Medieval and Early Modern England: Speaking as a Woman makes the provocative argument that despite extensive evidence indicating a wholesale suppression of early womens speech, women were actively engaged in cultural practices and speech strategies. M.C. Bodden ably demonstrates that not only did women have their own epistemologies, but they were also simultaneously complicit with patriarchal ideology and subversive in undermining that ideology.
Main Description
Language as the Site of Revolt in Medieval and Early Modern England: Speaking as a Woman makes the provocative argument that despite extensive evidence indicating a wholesale suppression of early women's speech, women were actively engaged in cultural practices and speech strategies. M.C. Bodden ably demonstrates that not only did women have their own epistemologies, but they were also simultaneously complicit with patriarchal ideology and subversive in undermining that ideology.
Main Description
This book makes the provocative argument that despite extensive evidence indicating a wholesale suppression of early women's speech, women were actively engaged in cultural practices and speech strategies that were simultaneously complicitous with patriarchal ideology and subversive in undermining that ideology.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
List of Abbreviationsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
The Control and Criminalization of Women's Speechp. 7
The "Imagined Woman"p. 7
Women, Conversation, Crime, and the Courtsp. 57
The Assembly of Ladies: Rebelling in Edenp. 79
Code-Switching: Male Crossing into Female Speech Domainp. 97
Margery Kempe: "I grab the microphone and move my body"-Volatile Speech, Volatile Bodiesp. 121
Conclusionp. 143
Notesp. 147
Bibliographyp. 245
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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