Catalogue


Sexual types : embodiment, agency, and dramatic character from Shakespeare to Shirley /
Mario DiGangi.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2011.
description
viii, 296 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0812243617 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780812243611 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2011.
isbn
0812243617 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780812243611 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: Deformation of character -- Pt. 1. Sexual types and necessary classifications: Keeping company: The sodomite's familiar vices; Fulfilling Venus: Substitutive logics and the tribade's agency -- Pt. 2. Sexual types and social discriminations: Mincing manners: The narcissistic courtier and the (de)formation of civility; Calling whore: The citizen wife and the erotics of open work -- Pt. 3. Sexual types and intermediary functions: Making common: Familiar knowledge and the bawd's seduction; Making monsters: The Caroline favorite and the erotics of royal will -- Epilogue.
catalogue key
7889239
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [260]-282) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-03-01:
DiGangi (Lehman College and the Graduate Center, CUNY) examines six "sexual types" on the Jacobean and Carolinian stage. Turning to a range of plays and to crime pamphlets and household-advice manuals, he places his arguments in conversation with those of materialist critics, reading the six types in "local" rather than psychoanalytic or character-study-based contexts. In places, the author purports to consider "embodiment," but he focuses so much on representations and the play of signifiers that the physical body itself seems absent from the analysis. However, one of the book's crucial strengths is that it complicates materialist claims about sexual types on the stage at every turn. These types, DiGangi argues, are not simply monstrous representations that stand radically opposed to norms; rather, they are "demonized" figures that generate ideological critique because they are variations on the familiar. Because the author fleshes out in extreme detail the materialist, New Historicist, and psychoanalytic claims that he builds on and complicates, this book is especially appropriate for those looking for detailed analyses of several decades of prior work on character types on the early modern stage. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, researchers, faculty. F. L. Den New York Institute of Technology, Old Westbury
Reviews
Review Quotes
"DiGangi is the early modern literary critic perhaps best equipped to deal with the intersections among sexuality, gender, and status hierarchies, and Sexual Types has important things to say about how such relations function in drama from the late sixteenth century through the Caroline period. A significant contribution to both early modern drama studies and sexuality studies."--Valerie Traub, University of Michigan
"DiGangi is the early modern literary critic perhaps best equipped to deal with the intersections among sexuality, gender, and status hierarchies, and Sexual Types has important things to say about how such relations function in drama from the late sixteenth century through the Caroline period. A significant contribution to both early modern drama studies and sexuality studies."-Valerie Traub, University of Michigan
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Sexual types on the early modern stage are at once strange and familiar. This book focuses on six types that reveal how sexual transgressions were understood to intersect with social, gender, economic and political transgressions.
Main Description
Sexual types on the early modern stage are at once strange and familiar, associated with a range of "unnatural" or "monstrous" sexual and gender practices, yet familiar because readily identifiable as types: recognizable figures of literary imagination and social fantasy. From the many found in early modern culture, Mario DiGangi here focuses on six types that reveal in particularly compelling ways, both individually and collectively, how sexual transgressions were understood to intersect with social, gender, economic, and political transgressions. Building on feminist and queer scholarship, Sexual Types demonstrates how the sodomite, the tribade (a woman-loving woman), the narcissistic courtier, the citizen wife, the bawd, and the court favorite function as sites of ideological contradiction in dramatic texts. On the one hand, these sexual types are vilified and disciplined for violating social and sexual norms; on the other hand, they can take the form of dynamic, resourceful characters who expose the limitations of the categories that attempt to define and contain them. In bringing sexuality and character studies into conjunction with one another, Sexual Types provides illuminating new readings of familiar plays, such as Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Winter's Tale , and of lesser-known plays by Fletcher, Middleton, and Shirley.
Main Description
Sexual types on the early modern stage are at once strange and familiar, associated with a range of "unnatural" or "monstrous" sexual and gender practices, yet familiar because readily identifiable as types: recognizable figures of literary imagination and social fantasy. From the many found in early modern culture, Mario DiGangi here focuses on six types that reveal in particularly compelling ways, both individually and collectively, how sexual transgressions were understood to intersect with social, gender, economic, and political transgressions. Building on feminist and queer scholarship, Sexual Types demonstrates how the sodomite, the tribade (a woman-loving woman), the narcissistic courtier, the citizen wife, the bawd, and the court favorite function as sites of ideological contradiction in dramatic texts. On the one hand, these sexual types are vilified and disciplined for violating social and sexual norms; on the other hand, they can take the form of dynamic, resourceful characters who expose the limitations of the categories that attempt to define and contain them. In bringing sexuality studies into conjunction with character studies, Sexual Types provides illuminating new readings of familiar plays, such as Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Winter's Tale , and of lesser-known plays by Fletcher, Middleton, and Shirley.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Introduction: Deformation of Characterp. 1
Sexual Types and Necessary Classifications
Keeping Company: The Sodomite's Familiar Vicesp. 21
Fulfilling Venus: Substitutive Logics and the Tribade's Agencyp. 60
Sexual Types and Social Discriminations
Mincing Manners: The Narcissistic Courtier and the (De)Formation of Civilityp. 91
Calling Whore: The Citizen Wife and the Erotics of Open Workp. 122
Sexual Types and Intermediary Functions
Making Common: Familiar Knowledge and the Bawd's Seductionp. 159
Making Monsters: The Caroline Favorite and the Erotics of Royal Willp. 192
Epiloguep. 221
Notesp. 226
Bibliographyp. 260
Indexp. 283
Acknowledgmentsp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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