Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Curative powers [electronic resource] : medicine and empire in Stalin's Central Asia /
Paula A. Michaels.
imprint
Pittsburgh, Pa. : University of Pittsburgh Press, c2003.
description
xvii, 239 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
082294197X (alk. paper), 9780822941972 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Pittsburgh, Pa. : University of Pittsburgh Press, c2003.
isbn
082294197X (alk. paper)
9780822941972 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Originally presented as the author's thesis (Ph.D.--University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1997) under the title: Shamans and surgeons.
catalogue key
7885494
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-234) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paula A. Michaels, assistant professor of history at the University of Iowa, is a recipient of the Louis Dupree Prize for Central Asian Research
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
PEN Center USA West Literary Awards, USA, 2004 : Nominated
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Contributes to the history of a country that still remains enigmatic for the English-speaking audience." --Journal of the History of Medicine
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, June 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work reconstructs how the Soviet government used medicine and public health policy to transform the society, politics and culture of its outlying regions - Kazakhstan in particular. It is an archival and ethnographical research revealing the Soviets colonial dominion of the Kazakhs.
Main Description
Curative Powers combines post-colonial theory with ethnographic research to reconstructs how the Soviet government used medicine and public health policy to transform the society, politics, and culture of its outlying regions, specifically Kazakhstan. Winner of the 2003 Heldt Prize from the Association for Women in Slavic Studies.
Main Description
Curative Powerscombines post-colonial theory with ethnographic research to reconstructs how the Soviet government used medicine and public health policy to transform the society, politics, and culture of its outlying regions, specifically Kazakhstan. Winner of the 2003 Heldt Prize from the Association for Women in Slavic Studies.
Unpaid Annotation
Rich in oil and strategically located between Russia and China, Kazakhstan is one of the most economically and geopolitically important of the so-called Newly Independent States that emerged after the collapse of the USSR. Yet little is known in the West about its turbulent history under Soviet rule, particularly the ways that Soviet officials asserted colonial dominion over the Kazakhs and other ethnic minorities.Curative Powers reconstructs how the Soviet government used medicine and public health policy to transform the society, politics, and culture of its outlying regions. On the surface, the Soviet drive to bring biomedicine to Kazakh Central Asia seems altruistic. By combining colonial and postcolonial theory with intensive archival and ethnographic research, however, Michaels reveals how Soviet authorities attempted to destroy traditional Kazakh culture.In powerful, direct prose, Michaels examines the technologies, medical personnel, and public health initiatives intended to win theKazakh people's gratitude, and move the region toward what the Soviet state defined as civilization and political enlightenment. Grappling directly with the issue of Soviet colonialism, Curative Powers offers an in-depth exploration of this dramatic, bloody, and transformative era in Kazakhstan's history.
Table of Contents
List of Acronyms and Abbreviationsp. ix
Note on Terminologyp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Discourse
Kazakh Medicine and Russian Colonialism, 1861-1928p. 21
A Brief History of Kazakhstanp. 21
Kazakh Ethnomedical Practicesp. 24
Russian Orientalism and Kazakh Medicinep. 35
The Roots of Biomedicine in Kazakhstanp. 41
Conclusionp. 44
Medical Propaganda and Cultural Revolutionp. 46
Origins and Methods of Biomedical Propagandap. 48
The Construction of Kazakh Culture in Biomedical Propagandap. 51
The Doctor-Hero in Biomedical Propagandap. 59
Limits and Impact of the Biomedical Drivep. 64
Conclusionp. 68
Institution-Building
Medical Education and the Formation of a New Elitep. 73
The Expansion of Biomedical Educationp. 76
Nativization and Medical Educationp. 81
Interethnic Relations and Political Persecutionp. 86
The Politics of the Medical Curriculump. 96
Conclusionp. 101
Building Socialism: Medical Cadres in the Fieldp. 103
Facility Expansion and Cadre Distributionp. 104
Obstacles to Effective Health Carep. 109
The Impact of Medical and Public Health Servicesp. 120
Conclusionp. 124
Practice
The Politics of Women's Health Carep. 129
Kazakh Women's Everyday Life and Bolshevik Visions of Emancipationp. 130
Kazakh Women and the OMM: Clinical Practice and Beyondp. 134
Abortion and Pronatalismp. 142
Wartime and Postwar OMM Servicesp. 146
Conclusionp. 150
Medical and Public Health Policy toward the Kazakh Nomadsp. 153
"Islands in the Steppe": Red Yurts and Communist Policyp. 154
Collectivization and Sedentarization of the Nomadsp. 164
Kazakhstan's Nomads and Medical Care after Collectivizationp. 170
Conclusionp. 174
Conclusionp. 177
Notesp. 183
Selected Bibliographyp. 225
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem