Catalogue

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New voices on early medieval sculpture in Britain and Ireland /
edited by Michael F. Reed.
imprint
Oxford, England : Archaeopress : Available from Hadrian Books [distributor], 2011.
description
iv, 74 p. : ill. (some col.), plans ; 30 cm.
ISBN
1407308408, 9781407308401
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
added author
imprint
Oxford, England : Archaeopress : Available from Hadrian Books [distributor], 2011.
isbn
1407308408
9781407308401
contents note
Approaching pre-Conquest stone sculpture : historiography and theory / Michael F. Reed -- Another perspective on the origins and symbolic interpretations of animals in early medieval sculpture in northern England and French Burgundy / Nicole M. Kleinsmith -- Putting memory in its place : sculpture, cemetery topography and commemoration / Zoë L. Devlin -- A cross-head from St. Mary Castlegate, York, and its affiliations / Victoria Whitworth -- Commemoration at York : the significance of Minster 42, "Costaun's" grave-cover / Heather Rawlin-Cushing -- Aspects of the Anglo-Saxon tradition in architectural sculpture and articulation : the "overlap" and beyond / Malcolm Thurlby -- Laser scanning of the inscribed Hiberno-Romanesque arch at Monaincha, Co. Tipperary, Ireland / Orla Murphy.
general note
Papers from a conference co-organized at the University of York, UK, in 2007.
catalogue key
7878299
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
The genesis of this volume was a conference co-organized at the University of York, U.K., in 2007 entitled New Voices on Early Medieval Sculpture. Opinions voiced at this conference demonstrated quite clearly that the study of early medieval sculpture in Britain and Ireland is changing. New technologies and evidence (including that which contextualizes sculptural production and patronage), coupled with increased methodological awareness, is generating compelling new interpretations of the role(s) of public art in memorial contexts. 1) Approaching pre-Conquest stone sculpture: historiography and theory (Michael F. Reed); 2) Another perspective on the origins and symbolic interpretations of animals in Early Medieval sculpture in Northern England and French Burgundy (Nicole M. Kleinsmith); 3) Putting memory in its place: sculpture, cemetery topography and commemoration (Zoe L. Devlin); 4) A cross-head from St Mary Castlegate, York, and its affiliations (Victoria Whitworth); 5) Commemoration at York: the significance of Minster 42, Costauns grave-cover (Heather Rawlin-Cushing); 6) Aspects of the Anglo-Saxon tradition in architectural sculpture and articulation: the overlap and beyond (Malcolm Thurlby); 7) Laser scanning of the inscribed Hiberno-Romanesque arch at Monaincha, Co. Tipperary, Ireland (Orla Murphy).
Main Description
Seven papers which aim to place early medieval insular sculpture more firmly in its social and cultural context, emphasising aspects of production and patronage, as well as the importance of monuments in the construction and maintenance of social memory. Contents: Approaching pre-Conquest stone sculpture: historiography and theory (Michael F. Reed); Another perspective on the origins and symbolic interpretations of animals in Early Medieval sculpture in Northern England and French Burgundy (Nicole M. Kleinsmith); Putting memory in its place: sculpture, cemetery topography and commemoration (Zoë L. Devlin); A cross-head from St Mary Castlegate, York, and its affiliations (Victoria Whitworth); Commemoration at York: the significance of Minster 42, Costauns grave-cover (Heather Rawlin-Cushing); Aspects of the Anglo-Saxon tradition in architectural sculpture and articulation: the overlap and beyond (Malcolm Thurlby); Laser scanning of the inscribed Hiberno-Romanesque arch at Monaincha, Co. Tipperary, Ireland (Orla Murphy).
Main Description
The genesis of this volume was a conference co-organized at the University of York, U.K., in 2007 entitled "New Voices on Early Medieval Sculpture". Opinions voiced at this conference demonstrated quite clearly that the study of early medieval sculpture in Britain and Ireland is changing. New technologies and evidence (including that which contextualizes sculptural production and patronage), coupled with increased methodological awareness, is generating compelling new interpretations of the role(s) of public art in memorial contexts.

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