Catalogue


The comparative imagination [electronic resource] : on the history of racism, nationalism, and social movements /
George M. Fredrickson.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
description
241 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520209966 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
isbn
0520209966 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7875587
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 213-236) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"By using an ever-widening comparative method, Fredrickson is able to illustrate the depth of institutional and intellectual incorporation of racism, and he keeps alive the possibility of moral and political reform."--Thomas Bender, New York University
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This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, December 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
In this collection of essays, an eminent American historian of race relations discusses issues central to our understanding of the history of racism, the role of racism, and the possibilities for justice in contemporary society. George M Fredrickson provides an eloquent and vigorous examination of race relations in the U.S. and South Africa, and at the same time illuminates the emerging field of cross-cultural comparative history.
Main Description
In this collection of essays, an eminent American historian of race relations discusses issues central to our understanding of the history of racism, the role of racism, and the possibilites for justice in contemporary society. George M. Fredrickson provides an eloquent and vigorous examination of race relations in the United States and South Africa and at the same time illuminates the emerging field of comparative history--history that is explicitly cross-cultural in its comparisons of nations, eras, or social structures. Taken together, these thought-provoking, accessible essays--several never before published--bring new precision and depth to our understanding of racism and justice, both historically and for society today. The first group of essays in The Comparative Imaginationsummarizes and evaluates the cross-national comparative history written in the past fifty years. These essays pay particular attention to comparative work on slavery and race relations, frontiers, nation-building and the growth of modern welfare states, and class and gender relations. The second group of essays represents some of Fredrickson's own explorations into the cross-cultural study of race and racism. Included are new essays covering such topics as the theoretical and cross-cultural meaning of racism, the problem of race in liberal thought, and the complex relationship between racism and state-based nationalism. The third group contains Fredrickson's recent work on anti-racist and black liberation movements in the United States and South Africa, especially in the period since World War II. In addition, Fredrickson's provocative introduction breaks significant new intellectual ground, outlining a justification for the methods of comparative history in light of such contemporary intellectual trends as the revival of narrative history and the predominance of postmodern thought.
Long Description
In this collection of essays, an eminent American historian of race relations discusses issues central to our understanding of the history of racism, the role of racism, and the possibilites for justice in contemporary society. George M. Fredrickson provides an eloquent and vigorous examination of race relations in the United States and South Africa and at the same time illuminates the emerging field of comparative history--history that is explicitly cross-cultural in its comparisons of nations, eras, or social structures. Taken together, these thought-provoking, accessible essays--several never before published--bring new precision and depth to our understanding of racism and justice, both historically and for society today. The first group of essays inThe Comparative Imaginationsummarizes and evaluates the cross-national comparative history written in the past fifty years. These essays pay particular attention to comparative work on slavery and race relations, frontiers, nation-building and the growth of modern welfare states, and class and gender relations. The second group of essays represents some of Fredrickson's own explorations into the cross-cultural study of race and racism. Included are new essays covering such topics as the theoretical and cross-cultural meaning of racism, the problem of race in liberal thought, and the complex relationship between racism and state-based nationalism. The third group contains Fredrickson's recent work on anti-racist and black liberation movements in the United States and South Africa, especially in the period since World War II. In addition, Fredrickson's provocative introduction breaks significant new intellectual ground, outlining a justification for the methods of comparative history in light of such contemporary intellectual trends as the revival of narrative history and the predominance of postmodern thought.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The Status of Comparative History (1980)p. 23
The Frontier of South African and American Historyp. 37
From Exceptionalism of Variability: Recent Developments in Cross-National Comparative Historyp. 47
Planters, Junkers, and Pomeschikip. 66
Understanding Racism: Reflections of a Comparative Historianp. 77
Race and Empire in Liberal Thought: The Legacy of Tocquevillep. 98
Black-White Relations since Emancipation: The Search for a Comparative Perspectivep. 117
Reform and Revolution in American and South African Freedom Strugglesp. 135
Prophets of Black Liberationp. 149
Nonviolent Resistance to White Supremacy: The American Civil Rights Movement and the South African Defiance Campaignsp. 173
From Black Power to Black Consciousnessp. 189
Notesp. 213
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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