Catalogue


Clocks in the sky [electronic resource] : the story of pulsars /
Geoff McNamara.
imprint
Berlin ; New York : Springer ; Chichester, UK : Published in association with Praxis, c2008.
description
x, 190 p. : ill.
ISBN
0387765603 (pbk.), 9780387765600 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
added author
imprint
Berlin ; New York : Springer ; Chichester, UK : Published in association with Praxis, c2008.
isbn
0387765603 (pbk.)
9780387765600 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7872503
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-05-01:
McNamara, an Australian science teacher, has produced a masterpiece of science writing. Beginning with just enough astronomical background to bring casual readers up to speed, he proceeds to provide vignettes of the key theoretical developments and observational discoveries over the last 75 years that establish pulsars as one of the most important fields in astronomy. Since their original observational confirmation in 1967, pulsars have been the basis for two Nobel Prizes, providing a unique laboratory for studying exotic matter and extreme magnetic fields, as well as rigorous tests of general relativity. Pulsars even provided the first confirmation of planets outside the solar system. Readers are brought right into the scientific story via firsthand accounts of key events, and even some of the original data and lab notes are provided. McNamara tells the story--warts and all--and recounts intriguing scientific ethical issues. Surprisingly, the descriptions of difficult topics such as relativistic effects are so well explained that casual readers will understand the basic principles. This book has it all: excellent writing, thorough attention to historical accuracy, and good science. This book is hard to put down! Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. T. D. Oswalt Florida Institute of Technology
Reviews
Review Quotes
From the reviews:"McNamara … has produced a masterpiece of science writing. … he proceeds to provide vignettes of the key theoretical developments and observational discoveries over the last 75 years that establish pulsars as one of the most important fields in astronomy. … difficult topics such as relativistic effects are so well explained that casual readers will understand the basic principles. This book has … excellent writing, thorough attention to historical accuracy, and good science. This book is hard to put down! Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries." (T. D. Oswalt, Choice, Vol. 46 (9), May, 2009)"The author begins with some background information on the life and death of stars, an introduction to the neutron that is essential, some comments on quasars … . There are now a number of different types of pulsar, some having been found in the most unlikely places, for instance globular pulsars, pulsars with planets, magnetars and multibeams. The presentation is never boring and manages to convey the continued excitement that identifies the subject. I can … recommend it." (Bill Barlow, Astronomy Now, September, 2009)
From the reviews: "McNamara … has produced a masterpiece of science writing. … he proceeds to provide vignettes of the key theoretical developments and observational discoveries over the last 75 years that establish pulsars as one of the most important fields in astronomy. … difficult topics such as relativistic effects are so well explained that casual readers will understand the basic principles. This book has … excellent writing, thorough attention to historical accuracy, and good science. This book is hard to put down! Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries." (T. D. Oswalt, Choice, Vol. 46 (9), May, 2009) "The author begins with some background information on the life and death of stars, an introduction to the neutron that is essential, some comments on quasars … . There are now a number of different types of pulsar, some having been found in the most unlikely places, for instance globular pulsars, pulsars with planets, magnetars and multibeams. The presentation is never boring and manages to convey the continued excitement that identifies the subject. I can … recommend it." (Bill Barlow, Astronomy Now, September, 2009)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2009
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Summaries
Long Description
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. Pulsar rotation rates can reach incredible speeds, up to hundreds of times per second. The story of how an object 'spins up' to a significant fraction of the speed of light is fascinating and involves collapsing stellar cores following supernova explosions, while the faster ones result from stellar cannibalism.In this book, Geoff McNamara explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy. The story of pulsars is brought right up to date with the announcement in 2006 of a new breed of pulsar, Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs), which emit short bursts of radio signals separated by long pauses. These may outnumber conventional radio pulsars by a ratio of four to one. Geoff McNamara ends by pointing out that, despite the enormous success of pulsar research in the second half of the twentieth century, the real discoveries are yet to be made including, perhaps, the detection of the hypothetical pulsar black hole binary system by the proposed Square Kilometre Array - the largest single radio telescope in the world.
Main Description
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. Pulsar rotation rates can reach incredible speeds, up to hundreds of times per second. The story of how an object spins up to a significant fraction of the speed of light is fascinating and involves collapsing stellar cores following supernova explosions, while the faster ones result from stellar cannibalism. In this book, Geoff McNamara explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy. The story of pulsars is brought right up to date with the announcement in 2006 of a new breed of pulsar, Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs), which emit short bursts of radio signals separated by long pauses. These may outnumber conventional radio pulsars by a ratio of four to one. Geoff McNamara ends by pointing out that, despite the enormous success of pulsar research in the second half of the twentieth century, the real discoveries are yet to be made including, perhaps, the detection of the hypothetical pulsar black hole binary system by the proposed Square Kilometre Array - the largest single radio telescope in the world.
Main Description
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. In this book, Geoff McNamara explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy. The story of pulsars is brought right up to date with the announcement in 2006 of a new breed of pulsar, Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs), which emit short bursts of radio signals separated by long pauses. These may outnumber conventional radio pulsars by a ratio of four to one. Geoff McNamara ends by pointing out that, despite the enormous success of pulsar research in the second half of the twentieth century, the real discoveries are yet to be made including, perhaps, the detection of the hypothetical pulsar black hole binary system by the proposed Square Kilometre Array - the largest single radio telescope in the world.
Main Description
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions.In this book, Geoff McNamara explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy. The story of pulsars is brought right up to date with the announcement in 2006 of a new breed of pulsar, Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs), which emit short bursts of radio signals separated by long pauses. These may outnumber conventional radio pulsars by a ratio of four to one. Geoff McNamara ends by pointing out that, despite the enormous success of pulsar research in the second half of the twentieth century, the real discoveries are yet to be made including, perhaps, the detection of the hypothetical pulsar black hole binary system by the proposed Square Kilometre Array - the largest single radio telescope in the world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. In this book, Geoff McNamara explores the history, discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy, including significant recent findings.
Long Description
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. Pulsar rotation rates can reach incredible speeds, up to hundreds of times per second. The story of how an object 'spins up' to a significant fraction of the speed of light is fascinating and involves collapsing stellar cores following supernova explosions, while the faster ones result from stellar cannibalism. In this book, Geoff McNamara explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy. The story of pulsars is brought right up to date with the announcement in 2006 of a new breed of pulsar, Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs), which emit short bursts of radio signals separated by long pauses. These may outnumber conventional radio pulsars by a ratio of four to one. Geoff McNamara ends by pointing out that, despite the enormous success of pulsar research in the second half of the twentieth century, the real discoveries are yet to be made including, perhaps, the detection of the hypothetical pulsar black hole binary system by the proposed Square Kilometre Array - the largest single radio telescope in the world.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Prologuep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Life and Death Among the Starsp. 5
1932p. 15
A New Windowp. 27
Scruffp. 39
What Makes Pulsars Tick?p. 55
The Crabp. 67
Optical Pulsarsp. 81
The Searchersp. 97
Two by Twop. 109
Faster and Strongerp. 121
Globular Pulsarsp. 129
Pulsar Planetsp. 137
Magnetarsp. 147
Seeing Doublep. 157
Of Multibeams and RRATsp. 165
The Futurep. 175
Appendixp. 181
Indexp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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