Catalogue


Jewish representation in British literature 1780-1840 : after Shylock /
Michael Scrivener.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
270 p.
ISBN
0230102891 (hardback), 9780230102897 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230102891 (hardback)
9780230102897 (hardback)
abstract
"Describing Jewish representation by Jews and Gentiles in the British Romantic era from the Old Bailey courtroom and popular songs to novels, poetry, and political pamphlets, Scrivener integrates popular culture with belletristic writing to explore the wildly varying treatments of stereotypical figures: the pedlar, the moneylender, the Jew's daughter, la belle juive, the convert, the prophet, the alchemist, and criminal"--
catalogue key
7867865
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [243]-258) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Michael Scrivener is a professor of English at Wayne State University. He is the author of Radical Shelley, Seditious Allegories, Two Plays by John Thelwll, Poetry and Refrom, and Cosmopolitan Ideal in the Age of Revolution and Reaction,1776-1832. He was awarded the 2006 Distinguished Scholar Award by the Keats-Shelley Association of America and recevied a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2007-08.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Scrivener's Jewish Representation in British Literature is the most encyclopedic study to date depicting Jews and Judaism during the Romantic period. Although it was once 'routine' (12) to overlook representations of Jews and works by Jewish writers in literary studies, scholarship on this subject in the last twenty years has created a much different critical terrain. Yet, as Scrivener demonstrates, much work remains to be done. The sheer volume of primary texts discussed here that have been little explored, or entirely overlooked, is remarkable. In this way, Jewish Representation in British Literature will be an invaluable sourcebook for further research." - The Wordsworth Circle "Scrivener's examination of Jewish representations in Romantic literature is wise and wide-ranging. His assessments are sober and trustworthy and the range of texts he considersis refreshing. He highlights the oft-neglected work of Levy Alexander and 'Jew' King, as well as the novels and poetry of King'sdaughters Charlotte and Sophia, andexamineswidely circulated textual representations of Jews - in court proceedings and popular songs - that have escaped attention in previous scholarship.This is a richly rewarding, well-crafted study." - Todd M. Endelman, William Haber Professor of Modern Jewish History, University of Michigan "An engaging and comprehensive overview of the literary portraits of British Jews, one that demonstrates that such representations are more nuanced than the labels anti- or philo-Semitic might suggest . . . This richly populated landscape is well worth the trip." - Michael Galchinsky, Professor of English, Georgia State University "Scrivener meticulously exposes 'a spectrum of prejudice and stereotypical perceptions' running as a noxious thread through English culture of the Romantic era. His new book serves both as an important historical reminder and as a wake-up call that indifference and bigotry are no less the components of today's anti-Semitism. Scrivener's surefooted handling of present-day cultural discourse as a gateway to interpreting the past is impressive and original." - Frank Felsenstein, Reed D. Voran Honors Distinguished Professor of Humanities, Ball State University
"Scrivener's examination of Jewish representations in Romantic literature is wise and wide-ranging. His assessments are sober and trustworthy and the range of texts he considers is refreshing. He highlights the oft-neglected work of Levy Alexander and 'Jew' King, as well as the novels and poetry of King's daughters Charlotte and Sophia, and examines widely circulated textual representations of Jewsin court proceedings and popular songsthat have escaped attention in previous scholarship. This is a richly rewarding, well-crafted study."Todd M. Endelman, William Haber Professor of Modern Jewish History, University of Michigan "An engaging and comprehensive overview of the literary portraits of British Jews, one that demonstrates that such representations are more nuanced than the labels anti- or philo-Semitic might suggest . . . This richly populated landscape is well worth the trip."--Michael Galchinsky, Professor of English, Georgia State University "Scrivener meticulously exposes 'a spectrum of prejudice and stereotypical perceptions' running as a noxious thread through English culture of the Romantic era. His new book serves both as an important historical reminder and as a wake-up call that indifference and bigotry are no less the components of today's anti-Semitism. Scrivener's surefooted handling of present-day cultural discourse as a gateway to interpreting the past is impressive and original."--Frank Felsenstein, Reed D. Voran Honors Distinguished Professor of Humanities, Ball State University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Describing Jewish representation by Jews and Gentiles in the British Romantic era Scrivener integrates explores the wildly varying treatments of stereotypical Jewish figures
Library of Congress Summary
"Describing Jewish representation by Jews and Gentiles in the British Romantic era from the Old Bailey courtroom and popular songs to novels, poetry, and political pamphlets, Scrivener integrates popular culture with belletristic writing to explore the wildly varying treatments of stereotypical figures: the pedlar, the moneylender, the Jew's daughter, la belle juive, the convert, the prophet, the alchemist, and criminal"--
Main Description
Describing Jewish representation both by Jews and Gentiles in the British Romantic era, Scrivener integrates popular culture with belletristic writing to explore the wildly varying treatments of stereotypical figures: the pedlar, the moneylender, the Jew's daughter, la belle juive , the convert, the prophet, the alchemist, and the criminal.
Main Description
Describing Jewish representation both by Jews and Gentiles in the British Romantic era, Scrivener integrates popular culture with belletristic writing to explore the wildly varying treatments of stereotypical figures: the pedlar, the moneylender, the Jew's daughter, la belle juive , the convert, the prophet, the alchemist, and the criminal. This sweeping study finds that pervasive Judaeophobia, reflecting old religious conflicts and new anxieties over modernity, affects but does not wholly determine the discourses that reflect a mix of Jewish and English cultures.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Jewish Representations, Literary Criticism and Historyp. 11
1656 and the Origins of Anglo-Jewish Writingp. 27
The Pedlarp. 45
The Moneylenderp. 83
The Jew's Daughterp. 113
Exiles and Prophetsp. 159
Conclusionp. 199
Notesp. 211
Bibliographyp. 243
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem