Catalogue


Centre and periphery, roots and exile : interpreting the music of István Anhalt, György Kurtág, and Sándor Veress /
Friedemann Sallis, Robin Elliott, and Kenneth DeLong, editors ; with assistance from Aaron Dalton.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfred Laurier University Press, c2011.
description
xviii, 461 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1554581486, 9781554581481
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfred Laurier University Press, c2011.
isbn
1554581486
9781554581481
contents note
István Anhalt : a character sketch / John Beckwith -- Kurtág, as I know him / Gergely Szokolay -- "A kind of musical autobiography" : reading traces in Sándor Veress's Orbis tonorum / Claudio Veress -- Of the centre, periphery; exile, liberation; home and the self / István Anhalt -- István Anhalt's Kingston triptych / Robin Elliott -- István Anhalt's The tents of Abraham : where music cannot heal, let it be restored / William Benjamin -- Which displacement? : tracing exile in the postwar compositions of István Anhalt and Mátyás Seiber / Florian Scheding -- Letters to America / Rachel Beckles Willson -- Roots and routes : travel and translation in István Anhalt's operas / Gordon E. Smith -- Le fonds István Anhalt (MUS 164) à Bibliothèque et Archives Canada : auto-construction du compositeur et rôle du lieu dans son œuvre / Rachelle Chiasson-Taylor -- Sewing earth to sky : István Anhalt and the pedagogy of transformation / Austin Clarkson -- György Kurtág's Játékok : a "voyage" into the child's musical mind / Stefano Melis -- Arracher la figure au figuratif : la musique vocale de György Kurtág / Alvaro Oviedo -- Dirges and ditties : György Kurtág's latest settings of poetry by Anna Akhmatova / Julia Galieva-Szokolay -- Interpreting György Kurtág and George Crumb : through the looking glass / Dina Lentsner -- György Kurtág et Walter Benjamin : considérations sur l'aura dans la musique / Jean-Paul Olive -- What presence of the past? : artistic autobiography in György Kurtág's music / Ulrich Mosch -- "Listening to inner voices" : István Anhalt Sonance * Resonance (Welche Töne?) / Alan Gillmor -- Music written from memory in the late work of István Anhalt / Friedemann Sallis -- On doubleness and life in Canada : an interview with István Anhalt.
general note
Chiefly essays originally presented at a symposium of the same name held Jan. 22-25 at the University of Calgary.
language note
Chiefly in English with 3 essays in French.
catalogue key
7867745
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Friedemann Sallis obtained his PhD in musicology under the direction of the late Carl Dahlhaus at the Technische Universitt Berlin. His writings include a book on the early works of Gyorgy ligeti and numerous articles. He is the co-editor of A Handbook to Twentieth-Century Musical Sketches (2004). Robin Ellitt taught at University College Dublin for six years before assuming the Jean A. Chalmers Chair in Canadian Music at the University of Toronto in 2002. He has edited several books, including two with Gordon E. Smith: Istvn Anhalt: Pathways andMemory (2001) and Music Traditions, Cultures, and Contexts (wlu Press, 2010). Kenneth Delong is a professor of music history at the University of Calgary, Alberta. He has published extensively on Romantic Czech music. He is also a music critic for the Calgary Herald and Opera Canada.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, December 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This book examines the impact place and displacement can have on the composition and interpretation of Western art music, using as its primary objects of study the work of Istvan Anhalt (1919–) and Gyôrgy Kurtfg (1926–). Although both composers are of Hungarian origin, their careers followed radically different paths. Kurtfg remained in Budapest for most of his career, whereas Anhalt left in 1946 and immigrated to Canada, where he became one of the country's leading composers.In the first section, "Place and Displacement," the contributors examine what happens when composers and their music migrate in the culturally complex world of the late twentieth century. The past one hundred years produced record numbers of refugees, and this fact is now beginning to resonate in the study of music. However, as Anhalt himself forcefully asserts, not all composers who emigrate should be understood as exiles. The book explores some of the problems and questions surrounding this issue.Essays in the second section, "Cultural Perspectives and Interpretation," look at how performing acts of interpretation on music implies bringing the time, place, and identity of the musician, the analyst, and the teacher to bear on the object of study. Like Kodfly, Kurtfg considers his work to be "naturally" embedded in Hungarian culture (both recent and remote). But he is also a quintessentially European artist. Much of his production—he is one of the twentieth centurys most prolific composers of vocal music—involves the setting of Hungarian texts, but in the late 1970s his cultural horizons expanded to include texts in Russian, German, French, English, and ancient Greek. The books explores how musicologists' divergent cultural perspectives impinge on the interpretation of this work.
Long Description
This book examines the impact place and displacement can have on the composition and interpretation of Western art music, using as its primary objects of study the work of Istvan Anhalt and Gyorgy Kurtag. Although both composers are of Hungarian origin, their careers followed radically different paths. Kurtag remained in Budapest for most of his career, whereas Anhalt left in 1946 and immigrated to Canada, where he became one of the country's leading composers. In the first section 'Place and Displacement', the contributors examine what happens when composers and their music migrate in the culturally complex world of the late twentieth century. The past one hundred years produced record numbers of refugees, and this fact is now beginning to resonate in the study of music. However, as Anhalt himself forcefully asserts, not all composers who emigrate should be understood as exiles. The book explores some of the problems and questions surrounding this issue. Essays in the second section, 'Cultural Perspectives and Interpretation', look at how performing acts of interpretation on music implies bringing the time, place, and identity of the musician, the analyst, and the teacher to bear on the object of study. Like Kodaly, Kurtag considers his work to be 'naturally' embedded in Hungarian culture (both recent and remote). But he is also a quintessentially European artist. Much of his production - he is one of the twentieth century's most prolific composers of vocal music - involves the setting of Hungarian texts, but in the late 1970s his cultural horizons expanded to include texts in Russian, German, French, English, and ancient Greek. The book explores how musicologists' divergent cultural perspectives impinge on the interpretation of this work.
Main Description
This book examines the impact place and displacement can have on the composition and interpretation of Western art music, using as its primary objects of study the work of Istvfn Anhalt (1919–) and Gy_rgy Kurtfg (1926–). Although both composers are of Hungarian origin, their careers followed radically different paths. Kurtfg remained in Budapest for most of his career, whereas Anhalt left in 1946 and immigrated to Canada, where he became one of the country's leading composers.In the first section, "Place and Displacement," the contributors examine what happens when composers and their music migrate in the culturally complex world of the late twentieth century. The past one hundred years produced record numbers of refugees, and this fact is now beginning to resonate in the study of music. However, as Anhalt himself forcefully asserts, not all composers who emigrate should be understood as exiles. The book explores some of the problems and questions surrounding this issue.Essays in the second section, "Cultural Perspectives and Interpretation," look at how performing acts of interpretation on music implies bringing the time, place, and identity of the musician, the analyst, and the teacher to bear on the object of study. Like Kodfly, Kurtfg considers his work to be "naturally" embedded in Hungarian culture (both recent and remote). But he is also a quintessentially European artist. Much of his production—he is one of the twentieth centurys most prolific composers of vocal music—involves the setting of Hungarian texts, but in the late 1970s his cultural horizons expanded to include texts in Russian, German, French, English, and ancient Greek. The books explores how musicologists' divergent cultural perspectives impinge on the interpretation of this work.
Main Description
This book examines the impact place and displacement can have on the composition and interpretation of Western art music, using as its primary objects of study the work of Istvan Anhalt (1919-) and Gyorgy Kurtag (1926-). Although both composers are of Hungarian origin, their careers followed radically different paths. Kurtag remained in Budapest for most of his career, whereas Anhalt left in 1946 and immigrated to Canada, where he became one of the country's leading composers. The past one hundred years produced record numbers of refugees, and this fact is now beginning to resonate in the study of music. However, as Anhalt himself forcefully asserts, not all composers who emigrate should be understood as exiles. The book explores some of the problems and questions surrounding this issue.
Main Description
This book examines the impact place and displacement can have on the composition and interpretation of Western art music, using as its primary objects of study the work of Istvfn Anhalt (1919–) and Gy_rgy Kurtfg (1926–). Although both composers are of Hungarian origin, their careers followed radically different paths. Kurtfg remained in Budapest for most of his career, whereas Anhalt left in 1946 and immigrated to Canada, where he became one of the country's leading composers. In the first section, "Place and Displacement," the contributors examine what happens when composers and their music migrate in the culturally complex world of the late twentieth century. The past one hundred years produced record numbers of refugees, and this fact is now beginning to resonate in the study of music. However, as Anhalt himself forcefully asserts, not all composers who emigrate should be understood as exiles. The book explores some of the problems and questions surrounding this issue. Essays in the second section, "Cultural Perspectives and Interpretation," look at how performing acts of interpretation on music implies bringing the time, place, and identity of the musician, the analyst, and the teacher to bear on the object of study. Like Kodfly, Kurtfg considers his work to be "naturally" embedded in Hungarian culture (both recent and remote). But he is also a quintessentially European artist. Much of his production—he is one of the twentieth centurys most prolific composers of vocal music—involves the setting of Hungarian texts, but in the late 1970s his cultural horizons expanded to include texts in Russian, German, French, English, and ancient Greek. The books explores how musicologists' divergent cultural perspectives impinge on the interpretation of this work.
Main Description
This book examines the impact place and displacement can have on the composition and interpretation of Western art music, using as its primary objects of study the work of István Anhalt (1919–2012) György Kurtág (1926–) and Sándor Veress (1907–92). Although all three composers are of Hungarian origin, their careers followed radically different paths. Whereas, Kurtág remained in Budapest for most of his career, Anhalt and Veress left: the former in 1946 and immigrated to Canada and the latter in 1948 and settled in Switzerland. All three composers have had an extraordinary impact in the cultural environments within which their work took place. In the first section, "Place and Displacement," contributors examine what happens when composers and their music migrate in the culturally complex world of the late twentieth century. The past one hundred years produced record numbers of refugees, and this fact is now beginning to resonate in the study of music. As Anhalt himself forcefully asserts, however, not all composers who emigrate should be understood as exiles. The first chapters of this book explore some of the problems and questions surrounding this issue. Essays in the second section, "Perspectives on Reception, Analysis, and Interpretation," look at how performing acts of interpretation on music implies bringing the time, place, and identity of the musician, the analyst, and the teacher to bear on the object of study. Like Kodály, Kurtág considers his work to be "naturally" embedded in Hungarian culture, but he is also a quintessentially European artist. Much of his production--he is one of the twentieth century's most prolific composers of vocal music--involves the setting of Hungarian texts, but in the late 1970s his cultural horizons expanded to include texts in Russian, German, French, English, and ancient Greek. The book explores how musicologists' divergent cultural perspectives impinge on the interpretation of this work. The final section, "The Presence of the Past and Memory in Contemporary Music," examines the impact time and memory can have on notions of place and identity in music. All living art taps into the personal and collective past in one way or another. The final four chapters look at various aspects of this relationship.
Bowker Data Service Summary
By studying the works and lives of composers, primarily Anhalt and Kurtág, this book examines the impact place and displacement can have on both the composition and interpretation of Western art music.
Table of Contents
List of Examplesp. ix
List of Plates and Figuresp. xiv
List of Tablesp. xvii
Acknowledgementsp. xviii
Introductionp. 1
First Word
István Anhalt: A Character Sketchp. 29
Kurtág, as I Know Himp. 37
"A Kind of Musical Autobiography": Reading Traces in Sandor Veress's Orbis tonorump. 45
Place and Displacement
Of die Centre, Periphery; Exile, Liberation; Home and the Selfp. 57
István Anhalt's Kingston Triptychp. 73
István Anhalt's The Tents of Abraham: Where Music Cannot Heal, Let It Be Restoredp. 89
Which Displacement? Tracing Exile in the Postwar Compositions of István Anhalt and Matyas Seiberp. 111
Letters to Americap. 129
Roots and Routes: Travel and Translation in Istvfin Anhalt's Operasp. 175
Le fonds István Anhalt (mus 164) a Bibliotheque et Archives Canada : auto-construction du compositeur et role du lieu dans son ceuvrep. 199
Perspectives on Reception, Analysis, and Interpretation
Sewing Earth to Sky: István Anhalt and the Pedagogy of Transformationp. 219
Gyorgy Kurtag'sjdtekok: A "Voyage" into the Child's Musical Mindp. 241
Arracher la figure au figuratif: la musique vocale de Gyorgy Kurtagp. 265
Dirges and Ditties: Gyorgy Kurtag's Latest Settings of Poetry by Anna Akhmatovap. 279
Interpreting Gyorgy Kurtag and George Crumb: Through the Looking Glassp. 303
The presence of the Past and Memory in Contemporary Music
Gyorgy Kurtag et Walter Benjamin : considerations sur l'aura dans la musiquep. 327
What Presence of the Past? Artistic Autobiography in Gyorgy Kurtag's Musicp. 345
"Listening to inner voices": István Anhalt's Sonance 'Resonance (Welche Tone?)p. 371
Music Written from Memory in the Late Work of István Anhaltp. 395
Final Word
On Doubleness and Life in Canada: An Interview with István Anhaltp. 423
The Contributorsp. 433
Indexp. 439
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem