Catalogue


The Chinese in Toronto from 1878 : from outside to inside the circle /
Arlene Chan.
imprint
Toronto : Dundurn Press, 2011.
description
241 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1554889790 (Paper), 9781554889792 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Toronto : Dundurn Press, 2011.
isbn
1554889790 (Paper)
9781554889792 (Paper)
catalogue key
7867213
 
Also issued in electronic formats.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [229]-234) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
The reader is rewarded with a steep and rich cultural tapestry of a history largely left untouched by historians.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The modest beginnings of the Chinese in Toronto and the development of Chinatown is largely due to the completion of the CPR in 1885. No longer requiring the services of the Chinese labourers, a hostile British Columbia sent them eastward in search of employment and a more welcoming place.In 1894 Toronto's Chinese population numbered fifty. Today, no less than seven Chinatowns serve what has become the second-largest visible minority in the city, with a population of half a million. In these pages, you will find their stories told through historical accounts, archival and present-day photographs, newspaper clippings, and narratives from old-timers and newcomers. With achievements spanning all walks of life, the Chinese in Toronto are no longer looking in from outside society's circle. Their lives are a vibrant part of the diverse mosaic that makes Toronto one of the most multicultural cities in the world.
Main Description
The arrival of the Chinese in Toronto and the development of Chinatown owes its modest beginnings to the completion of the CPR in 1885. No longer requiring the services of the Chinese labourers, a hostile British Columbia sent them eastward in search of employment and a more welcoming place.In 1894 Toronto's Chinese population numbered 50. Today no less than seven Chinatowns serve the second-largest visible minority in the city, with a population of half a million. Their stories are told through historical accounts, archival and present-day photographs, newspaper clippings, and narratives and writing from old-timers and newcomers. With achievements spanning all walks of life, the Chinese in Toronto are no longer looking in from outside the circle. Their lives are a vibrant part of the diverse mosaic that makes Toronto one of the most multicultural cities in the world.
Main Description
The modest beginnings of the Chinese in Toronto and the development of Chinatown is largely due to the completion of the CPR in 1885. No longer requiring the services of the Chinese labourers, a hostile British Columbia sent them eastward in search of employment and a more welcoming place. In 1894 Toronto's Chinese population numbered fifty. Today, no less than seven Chinatowns serve what has become the second-largest visible minority in the city, with a population of half a million. In these pages, you will find their stories told through historical accounts, archival and present-day photographs, newspaper clippings, and narratives from old-timers and newcomers. With achievements spanning all walks of life, the Chinese in Toronto are no longer looking in from outside society's circle. Their lives are a vibrant part of the diverse mosaic that makes Toronto one of the most multicultural cities in the world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The arrival of the Chinese in Toronto and the development of Chinatown owes its modest beginnings to the completion of the CPR in 1885. Their stories are told through historical accounts, archival and present-day photographs, newspaper clippings, and narratives and writing from old-timers and newcomers.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. 9
Introductionp. 11
One The Gold Rush and the Canadian Pacific Railway, 1858-1885p. 15
Two The Birth of Toronto'sChinatown, 1885-1922p. 23
Three Early Organizations and the Great War, 1885-1922p. 51
Four The Bachelor Society and the War Years, 1923-1947p. 67
Five Saving Chinatown, 1947-1966p. 97
Six The Changing Face of Chinatown from 1967p. 125
Seven Ethnoburbs in the 1980sp. 153
Eight Diversity in the 1990s and 2000sp. 167
Nine Inside the Circlep. 197
Chinese Canadians (Greater Toronto Area) Appointed to the Order of Canada, 1976-2010p. 207
Chinese Canadians (Greater Toronto Area) Appointed to the Order of Ontario, 1991-2010p. 209
Notesp. 211
Selected Bibliographyp. 229
Indexp. 235
About the Authorp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem