Catalogue


The makings of Indonesian Islam : orientalism and the narration of a Sufi past /
Michael Laffan.
imprint
Princeton [N.J.] ; Oxford [England] : Princeton University Press, c2011.
description
xx, 301 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
069114530X (cloth : alk. paper), 9780691145303 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton [N.J.] ; Oxford [England] : Princeton University Press, c2011.
isbn
069114530X (cloth : alk. paper)
9780691145303 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Pt. 1. Inspiration, rememoration, reform. Remembering islamization, 1300n-1750 -- Embracing a new curriculum, 1750n-1830 -- Reform and the widening muslim sphere, 1830n-1890 -- pt 2. Power in quest of knowledge. Four foundational visions of Indies Islam, 1600n-1800 -- New regimes of knowledge, 1800n-1865 -- Seeking the counterweight church, 1837n-1889 -- pt. 3. Orientalism engaged. Distant musings on a crucial colony, 1882n-1888 -- Collaborative encounters, 1889n-1892 -- Shadow muftis, Christian modern, 1892n-1906 -- pt. 4. Sufi pasts, modern futures -- From Sufism to Salafism, 1905n-1911 -- Advisors to Indonesie, 1906n-1919 -- Hardenings and partings, 1919n-1942.
catalogue key
7867027
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This book is a major contribution to our understanding of Indonesian Islam. Laffan's methodical and exhaustive research provides us with a well of information and insights that will be mined by scholars and students for years to come. The Makings of Indonesian Islam establishes a new benchmark for scholarship on the subject."--Barbara Watson Andaya, coauthor of A History of Malaysia "The Makings of Indonesian Islam is the best available overview of Islam in the Netherlands East Indies. Laffan offers an original and exciting way of studying the subject."--Nico Kaptein, coeditor of Transcending Borders: Arabs, Politics, Trade, and Islam in Southeast Asia
Flap Copy
"This book is a major contribution to our understanding of Indonesian Islam. Laffans methodical and exhaustive research provides us with a well of information and insights that will be mined by scholars and students for years to come. The Makings of Indonesian Islam establishes a new benchmark for scholarship on the subject."-- Barbara Watson Andaya, coauthor of A History of Malaysia "The Makings of Indonesian Islam is the best available overview of Islam in the Netherlands East Indies. Laffan offers an original and exciting way of studying the subject."-- Nico Kaptein, coeditor of Transcending Borders: Arabs, Politics, Trade, and Islam in Southeast Asia
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-04-01:
This well-written, deeply erudite history by Princeton historian Laffan, a prominent scholar of Islam in Southeast Asia, explores the development of Islamic learning in the islands of what is now Indonesia as well as how the faith came to be understood and explained by Dutch scholars during the colonial period. As such, the book offers a compelling parallel history of Indonesia, setting up an engaging new narrative separate from the one most commonly presented, wherein the imposition of colonial rule and later emergence of nationalist consciousness follows a more secular path. Laffan's work bypasses much reference to the accepted historical tropes of colonial policy and nationalist history to delve into another world that brings the discourses of Muslim scholars to the fore, following their ebb and flow around the archipelago over the centuries. The analysis of this intellectual life, along with the thorough understanding of local religious authorities' deeply felt faith, offers a new vision of Indonesian lives under colonial rule. With this emphasis, however, the book works best for readers who have preexisting knowledge of Islam and/or Indonesia. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division and graduate collections. S. Maxim University of California, Berkeley
Reviews
Review Quotes
Lafffan's very rich account . . . [is] an original and richly detailed contribution to writing the history of an Indonesian Islam.
"Lafffan's very rich account . . . [is] an original and richly detailed contribution to writing the history of an Indonesian Islam."-- Carool Kersten, Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia and Oceania
The Makings of Indonesian Islam is an impressive and important scholarly contribution that provides a wealth of information and critical perspectives to scholars and students alike. A glossary, index, and eleven figures (including maps and photographs) enrich the text and are helpful resources for the reader. As an ethnomusicologist with research interests in Javanese arts and culture, I very much look forward to using this book in my own research projects and rereading this book with students in advanced seminars.
" The Makings of Indonesian Islam is an impressive and important scholarly contribution that provides a wealth of information and critical perspectives to scholars and students alike. A glossary, index, and eleven figures (including maps and photographs) enrich the text and are helpful resources for the reader. As an ethnomusicologist with research interests in Javanese arts and culture, I very much look forward to using this book in my own research projects and rereading this book with students in advanced seminars."-- Christina Sunardi, American Journal of Islamic Social Sciences
This book offers an original reflection on the factors that have contributed to the faces of Islam in Indonesia today. It is fascinating, and brilliant in the lines of argument and interplay of themes that it develops, and despite the liveliness, at times playfulness of style, is dense and closely argued in its texture. . . . [T]his is a wonderful book.
"This book offers an original reflection on the factors that have contributed to the faces of Islam in Indonesia today. It is fascinating, and brilliant in the lines of argument and interplay of themes that it develops, and despite the liveliness, at times playfulness of style, is dense and closely argued in its texture. . . . [T]his is a wonderful book."-- Anthony H. Johns, Journal of Southeast Asian Studies
This well-written, deeply erudite history by Princeton historian Laffan, a prominent scholar of Islam in Southeast Asia, explores the development of Islamic learning in the islands of what is now Indonesia as well as how the faith came to be understood and explained by Dutch scholars during the colonial period. As such, the book offers a compelling parallel history of Indonesia, setting up an engaging new narrative separate from the one most commonly presented, wherein the imposition of colonial rule and later emergence of nationalist consciousness follows a more secular path. . . . The analysis of this intellectual life, along with the thorough understanding of local religious authorities' deeply felt faith, offers a new vision of Indonesian lives under colonial rule.
This well-written, deeply erudite history by Princeton historian Laffan, a prominent scholar of Islam in Southeast Asia, explores the development of Islamic learning in the islands of what is now Indonesia as well as how the faith came to be understood and explained by Dutch scholars during the colonial period. As such, the book offers a compelling parallel history of Indonesia, setting up an engaging new narrative separate from the one most commonly presented, wherein the imposition of colonial rule and later emergence of nationalist consciousness follows a more secular path. . . . The analysis of this intellectual life, along with the thorough understanding of local religious authorities' deeply felt faith, offers a new vision of Indonesian lives under colonial rule. -- "Choice
With its meticulous scholarship and its wealth of insights into European and Indonesian Muslim understandings of Islam, however, there can be no doubt that this is a path-breaking study. It is a book that should be welcomed and read by all scholars of Islam and all specialists of Indonesia.
"With its meticulous scholarship and its wealth of insights into European and Indonesian Muslim understandings of Islam, however, there can be no doubt that this is a path-breaking study. It is a book that should be welcomed and read by all scholars of Islam and all specialists of Indonesia."-- Robert W. Hefner, Indonesia
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Indonesian Islam is often portrayed as being intrinsically moderate, with more violent traditions coming from outside. Laffan challenges this view, as he traces the history of Indonesian Islam.
Main Description
Indonesian Islam is often portrayed as being intrinsically moderate by virtue of the role that mystical Sufism played in shaping its traditions. According to Western observers--from Dutch colonial administrators and orientalist scholars to modern anthropologists such as the late Clifford Geertz--Indonesia's peaceful interpretation of Islam has been perpetually under threat from outside by more violent, intolerant Islamic traditions that were originally imposed by conquering Arab armies. The Makings of Indonesian Islam challenges this widely accepted narrative, offering a more balanced assessment of the intellectual and cultural history of the most populous Muslim nation on Earth. Michael Laffan traces how the popular image of Indonesian Islam was shaped by encounters between colonial Dutch scholars and reformist Islamic thinkers. He shows how Dutch religious preoccupations sometimes echoed Muslim concerns about the relationship between faith and the state, and how Dutch-Islamic discourse throughout the long centuries of European colonialism helped give rise to Indonesia's distinctive national and religious culture. The Makings of Indonesian Islam presents Islamic and colonial history as an integrated whole, revealing the ways our understanding of Indonesian Islam, both past and present, came to be.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Abbreviations and Archival Referentsp. xvii
Inspiration, Rememoration, Reformp. 1
Remembering Islamization, 1300-1750p. 3
Embracing a New Curriculum, 1750-1800p. 25
Reform and the Widening Muslim Sphere, 1800-1890p. 40
Power in Quest of Knowledgep. 65
Foundational Visions of Indies Islam, 1600-1800p. 67
New Regimes of Knowledge, 1800-1865p. 85
Seeking the Counterweight Church, 1837-1889p. 101
Orientalism Engagedp. 123
Distant Musings on a Crucial Colony, 1882-1888p. 125
Collaborative Encounters, 1889-1892p. 147
Shadow Muftis, Christian Modern, 1892-1906p. 162
Sufi Pasts, Modern Futuresp. 175
From Sufism to Salafism, 1905-1911p. 177
Advisors to Indonesiƫ, 1906-1919p. 190
Hardenings and Partings, 1919-1942p. 209
Conclusionp. 233
Glossaryp. 237
Notesp. 243
Indexp. 287
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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