Catalogue

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The diversity index : the alarming truth about diversity in corporate America and what can be done about it /
Susan E. Reed.
imprint
New York : AMACOM, c2011.
description
vii, 294 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814416497, 9780814416495
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : AMACOM, c2011.
isbn
0814416497
9780814416495
contents note
The diversity buffet -- Merck's deliberate strategy: just do it -- A plan for progress -- The reality of change must accompany the rhetoric of change -- The cost of exclusion -- Scaling up: creating a minority supply chain -- No room at the top -- Affinity groups: plans for progress for employees -- Importing the important people -- A new plan for progress.
catalogue key
7867003
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Does a racial ceiling still exist? As we mark the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's Executive Order calling for a thoroughly integrated workplace, it's time to assess which corporations have contributed the most to this advancement and which have not. While it's true that more women and minorities can be found at the top of many corporations, troubling patterns have emerged. The partial application of diversity has resulted in the formation of a persistent white ceiling in corporate America as white women have outpaced people of color. More than 40 percent of the Fortune 100 corporations have no minorities among their executive officers. Minority females have fared the worst. In addition, globalization has resulted in many corporations preferring multinational diversity to national diversity, and U.S. minorities and whites are losing out. The majority of Asian and Hispanic executive officers in the Fortune 100 were born outside of the United States. In large numbers, Canadian and European competitors are being promoted ahead of their American-born, white male counterparts. Based on award-winning journalist Susan E. Reed's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index considers the historical reasons we went wrong, taking a close look at the "Plans for Progress" protocol developed in 1961, which defined the steps of affirmative action. It was initially considered a failure for not providing immediate results. This book analyzes the long-term, widespread effectiveness of the plan, and reveals the stories behind the few companies that have made a difference, breaking down the 10 simple steps you can take at your own organization to fully develop integration, keep it growing, and empower your employees to develop new products and markets. The book shares the fascinating stories of executives at General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Lockheed Martin, Merck, and PepsiCo, recounting their inspiringand instructivestruggles to make their way up the ladder, as well as to pave the way for others going forward. Organizations that embrace diversity aren't just "doing the right thing"across the board, they operate more successfully and outperform their peers. Based on unprecedented research, and filled with eye-opening real-world stories and clearly stated steps for practical action, The Diversity Index shows you how to harness diversity's true power, create a more resilient workforce, and seriously increase your own organization's bottom line. SUSAN E. REED is an Emmy award-winning, investigative journalist who has covered almost every aspect of the workplace for 25 years for CBS News, the New York Times , the Washington Post , the American Prospect , and other publications. She contributes a business column to the international news website GlobalPost.com. She can be reached at: thediversityindex@gmail.com.
First Chapter
<html><head></head><body><p style="margin-top: 0"> Introduction </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> THE PRESIDENT OF LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> and Vice President Lyndon Johnson agreed to end </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Lockheed’s workforce segregation on May 25, 1961. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Looking back, this contract, which was announced with great </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> fanfare at the White House, signified far more than the public </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> acknowledgment of systematic racial segregation in employment. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> It illustrated the leading role that prominent corporations </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> were beginning to embrace by hiring and promoting the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> widest range of workers in this country. Businesses were accepting </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> responsibility for actively shaping the full scope of </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> the American workforce. If corporations wish to have the best </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> educated, highest motivated and most diverse workforce in the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> world today, they should resume and expand the process of </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> reaching out to students, teachers, communities, and employees </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> started by this first Plan for Progress. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> A diversity index measures the number of species in a natural </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> environment. The more species there are, the healthier the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> environment is. My research showed that what is true in nature </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> also applies to business. Developing and promoting a diverse </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> workforce can lead to increased resilience in a corporation. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Companies with high levels of diversity have been found to </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> produce higher profit margins and greater returns on equity </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> and assets. Collective wisdom, the ideas contributed by diverse </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> groups and individuals, exceeds the sum of its parts. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> We are just beginning to understand the full diversity dividend </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that was started by the Plan for Progress. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Yet, in the late 1990s, a rash of discrimination lawsuits </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> spread across corporate America. Merrill Lynch paid more </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> than $200 million to settle a class action filed by more than </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 900 of its current and former female brokers. In 2000, Coca- </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Cola agreed to pay $192.5 million in a racial discrimination </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> case to African American workers who alleged they had been </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> paid and promoted less than similarly situated white workers. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> In 2008, Walgreen pledged $24 million to resolve a federal </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> lawsuit alleging widespread racial bias against 10,000 black </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> workers. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> If workplaces were so accepting of diversity, why were so </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> many workers suing their bosses? As I covered some of these </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> lawsuits for The New York Times and other publications, I was </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> struck—well, horrified really—by the toll the adversarial process </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> takes on both the plaintiffs and the defendants. In discrimination </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> lawsuits, the claims of the employee are pitted against the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> assertions of the employer. The allegations are frequently </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> framed in reductive terms: The employee is incapable of performing </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> the tasks, and the company is guilty of discrimination. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The legal wrangling often saps years from employees’ </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> careers, undermines their mental and physical well-being, and </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> jeopardizes their future employability. The suits cost the companies </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> substantial amounts of intellectual and emotional energy </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that could have been spent on growing the business. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Although the class action settlements often result in the companies’ </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> adopting new employee pay and promotion practices </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that promise to improve the workplace for everyone, the advances </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> come at a high price. I wanted to find the companies </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that had the most diverse leadership and to find out how they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> did it so other companies could follow suit. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> I conducted a study of race and gender of executive officers </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> of the 2005 Fortune 100. An executive officer is defined </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> as a president or vice president who is in charge of a principal </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> business unit, division or function. Executive officers set policy </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> for the corporation, and their names are usually contained </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> in the annual report to shareholders. My researchers and I determined, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> from photographs and published profiles of the executive </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> officers, their gender, race, and ethnicity according to </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> categories used by the U.S. government.We also gathered data </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> for the same companies for fiscal 1995 and 2009 to show </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> change over 14 years. We then contacted the companies to </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> verify the accuracy of our assessments and made adjustments </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> to the data if the companies offered corrections that were consistent </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> with the names listed in the 10-K, a document filed </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). We operated </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> on a fully transparent basis, notifying the companies of </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> the information and statistics we had gathered and telling them </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that they would be published. We made every effort to get the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> facts right. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> I discovered that the companies with the highest diversity </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> among their executive officers were using many of the same </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> practices. Like most Americans, I had never before heard of </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> the clunky-sounding Plans for Progress. I began reading Inventing </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Equal Opportunity (published in 2009) to understand </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> how the companies had come to share the same diversity practices. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Author Frank Dobbin described Plans for Progress. His </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> footnote led to a 1961 New York Times story quoting a spokesman </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> People (NAACP) criticizing the program’s effectiveness. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> As a journalist who has written and produced thousands of </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> stories, a large portion while covering an ongoing issue or </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> event, I knew that most news reports are simply snapshots in </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> time and cannot be taken as the final evaluation of a program. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> When the article was published in 1961, the program had just </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> begun, and it was too early to render a final judgment on its </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> success. The NAACP’s dismissal of the Plans for Progress as </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> nothing but hype was have been premature. Today, the conclusion </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> would be different. </p> </body></html>
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-03-01:
Reed, an investigative journalist, evaluates the level of diversity in American companies by examining the change in numbers of high-level executives in Fortune 100 companies from 1995 to 2009, focusing on gender, race, and ethnicity. The data show improvement, with some organizations doing well, but they also reveal imbalances. The book includes company names and data. Next Reed details the successful strategies followed by some large companies (e.g., General Electric, IBM, Merck) to increase diversity. She also provides societal, governmental, and organizational background from 1961. This information helps the reader understand problems, often forgotten, that employers faced as the US pursued employment diversity objectives during recent decades. Always, leadership from the top was essential for the success of any strategy. Today as organizations work to integrate other groups (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender), some of these strategies may be useful. Reed is concerned because many believe the national diversity objective has been achieved. However, with globalization, firms are hiring employees from many countries, often making their data on ethnic diversity look better. In fact, based on Reed's data, the increase in diversity of employees who are US citizens appears to have ended. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, graduate students, researchers, professionals. F. Reitman emerita, Pace University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, August 2011
Choice, March 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Based on author Susan E. Reed's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index provides a clear-eyed view of the current racial and gender barriers, and presents eye-opening accounts of executives at companies including General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, showing how they succeeded as individuals, and then went on to successfully promote change from within. The book distillsinto 10 clear stepsthe methods the most successful companies have used to encourage integration...and translates it into greater organizational success. Advance Praise for The Diversity Index : "This book is an important, if not seminal work....Reed's insights into who gets into the executive suite raise true and serious questions about the overall success of affirmative action in bringing the full diversity of the American population into corporations at all levels. They are questions that need to be answered by corporate and political leaders." Mike Deblieux, SPHR-CA, Principal Leadership Development Coach " The Diversity Index provides a corrective to the scholarly research on race integration and still-relevant lessons for corporations that seek to do better at it." Barbara Reskin, S. Frank Miyamoto Professor of Sociology, University of Washington "[A] thought-provoking and well researched book....While one can quarrel with some specifics of [Susan Reed's] recommendations, without a doubt, this will be an important and valuable book in the field of diversity as practitioners look to go to the next level with their work." R. Roosevelt Thomas, Jr., D.B.A., Chief Executive Officer, Roosevelt Thomas Consulting & Training, Inc.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Based on the author's study of Fortune 100 companies, 'The Diversity Index' identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling.
Description for Bookstore
Nearly 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement, there is a new crisis of opportunity in corporate America. Based on the author's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling. In addition, the quest for global profits has created worldwide competition for the corporate suite, and U.S.-born minorities and whites are losing out. This isn't only a civil rights issue, as studies have shown that businesses with a strong commitment to diversity outperform their peers. The book takes an in-depth look at companies that have struggled to find the perfect leadership mix. Detailing the stories of executives of General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, The Diversity Index distillsinto 10 clear stepsthe methods that the most successful companies used to develop integration, keep it growing, and empower their employees to develop new products and markets
Description for Bookstore
Nearly 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement, there is a new crisis of opportunity in corporate America. Based on the author's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling. In addition, the quest for global profits has created worldwide competition for the corporate suite, and U.S.-born minorities and whites are losing out. This isn't only a civil rights issue, as studies have shown that businesses with a strong commitment to diversity outperform their peers. The book takes an in-depth look at companies that have struggled to find the perfect leadership mix. Detailing the stories of executives of General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, The Diversity Index distillsinto 10 clear stepsthe methods that the most successful companies used to develop integration, keep it growing, and empower their employees to develop new products and markets.
Main Description
Nearly 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement, there is a new crisis of opportunity in corporate America. Based on the author "s groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling. In addition, the quest for global profits has created worldwide competition for the corporate suite, and U.S.-born minorities and whites are losing out. This isn "t only a civil rights issue, as studies have shown that businesses with a strong com mitment to diversity outperform their peers. The book takes an in-depth look at companies that have struggled to find the perfect leadership mix. Detailing the stories of executives of General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, The Diversity Index distills into 10 clear steps the methods that the most successful companies used to develop integration, keep it growing, and empower their employees to develop new products and markets.
Main Description
Nearly 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement, there is a new crisis of opportunity in corporate America. Based on the author's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling. In addition, the quest for global profits has created worldwide competition for the corporate suite, and U.S.-born minorities and whites are losing out. This isn't only a civil rights issue, as studies have shown that businesses with a strong com mitment to diversity outperform their peers. The book takes an in-depth look at companies that have struggled to find the perfect leadership mix. Detailing the stories of executives of General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, The Diversity Index distills into 10 clear steps the methods that the most successful companies used to develop integration, keep it growing, and empower their employees to develop new products and markets.
Main Description
Nearly 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement, there is a new crisis of opportunity in corporate America. Based on the author's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling. In addition, the quest for global profits has created worldwide competition for the corporate suite, and U.S.-born minorities and whites are losing out. This isn't only a civil rights issue, as studies have shown that businesses with a strong commitment to diversity outperform their peers. The book takes an in-depth look at companies that have struggled to find the perfect leadership mix. Detailing the stories of executives of General Electric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, The Diversity Index distills, into 10 clear steps, the methods that the most successful companies used to develop integration, keep it growing, and empower their employees to develop new products and markets.
Main Description
Nearly 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement, there is a new crisis of opportunity in corporate America. Based on the author's groundbreaking study of Fortune 100 companies, The Diversity Index identifies a barrier that has formed as white women have outpaced people of color and, along with white male executives, have wound up creating a persistent racial ceiling. In addition, the quest for global profits has created worldwide competition for the corporate suite, and U.S.-born minorities and whites are losing out. This isn't only a civil rights issue, as studies have shown that businesses with a strong commitment to diversity outperform their peers. The book takes an in-depth look at companies that have struggled to find the perfect leadership mix. Detailing the stories of executives of GeneralElectric, Hewlett Packard, Merck, and PepsiCo, The Diversity Index distills - into 10 clear steps - the methods that the most successful companies used to develop integration, keep it growing, and empower their employees to develop new products and markets.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The Diversity Buffetp. 1
Merck's Deliberate Strategy: Just Do Itp. 37
A Plan for Progressp. 69
The Reality of Change Must Accompany the Rhetoric of Changep. 85
The Cost of Exclusionp. 111
Scaling Up: Creating a Minority Supply Chainp. 135
No Room at the Topp. 161
Affinity Groups: Plans for Progress for Employeesp. 189
Importing the Important Peoplep. 213
A New Plan for Progressp. 235
Epiloguep. 255
Notesp. 257
Acknowledgmentsp. 281
Indexp. 285
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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