Catalogue


Masculine style : the American West and literary modernism /
Daniel Worden.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xii, 196 p.
ISBN
0230120318, 9780230120310
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230120318
9780230120310
contents note
Introduction : Masculinity, modernism, and the West -- Masculinity for the million: gender in dime novel westerns -- Between anarchy and hierarchy: Nat Love and Theodore Roosevelt's manly feelings -- Marrying men: intimacy in Owen Wister's The Virginian -- "I Like to be like a man": female masculinity in Willa Cather's O Pioneers! and My √Āntonia -- A discipline of sentiments: Ernest Hemingway's modernist masculinity -- Specters of masculinity: collectivity in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath -- Conclusion "There Never Was a Man Like Shane."
catalogue key
7863730
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [179]-189) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Worden is an assistant professor of English at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. His work on American literature and culture has appeared in Arizona Quarterly, Canadian Review of American Studies, Modern Fiction Studies, and The Southern Literary Journal, as well as the anthologies The Comics of Chris Ware: Drawing Is a Way of Thinking and Violence, the Arts, and Willa Cather.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-04-01:
Masculinity studies often focuses on the relationships between power and masculinity as a means of understanding how hegemonic formations of gender come into being. Worden (Univ. of Colorado, Colorado Springs), however, connects pulp Westerns and modernist novels in order to examine how both popular and literary fictions (a divide he questions) shaped contemporary understandings of masculinity by suggesting alternative possibilities for masculine identity. Chapters on dime novels, Teddy Roosevelt, Nat Love, and Owen Wister uncover the variety of masculine possibilities within a genre often read as limiting in its portrayals of men. Turning his attention to Hemingway, Cather, and Steinbeck, Worden reveals how their works draw on popular conceptions of manhood to create alternatives for men and women. His chapter on female masculinity in Cather is particularly interesting. Given his focus on Judith Butler and theories of performativity, Worden could usefully have engaged with recent work on masculinity and melancholic modernism (Jonathan Flatley and Greg Forter come to mind). But his juxtaposition of popular Western genre writers with canonical American modernist novelists allows him to usefully rethink the production of masculinities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. E. Magill Longwood University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Worden's Masculine Style is an astute, compellingly argued, appealingly offbeat, and innovative study of its subject that will make an exciting contribution to Americanist literary studies. Worden's argument, broadly speaking, is that the roots of American literary modernisman aesthetic period that we associate with the early twentieth century, and with the famous authors Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Steinlie in the dime novel western genre that flourished, commercially though not in terms of critical appreciation, in the late nineteenth century. Worden makes the bracing argument that the dime novel's various forms of gendered play inform literary modernism, and the valences he explores between the earlier, repudiated genre forms and the later, critically valorized period are illuminating and interesting."--David Greven, associate professor of English, Connecticut College and author of Men Beyond Desire and Manhood in Hollywood from Bush to Bush " Masculine Style is that rarest of books, an elegantly sustained set of readings that establish compelling and lasting connections between areas of study not commonly talked about in the same breath. Through the lens of gender analysis, Worden expertly recognizes the contribution of genre narratives from and about the American West in the formal and ideological contours of literary Modernism."--Nicolas S. Witschi, author of Traces of Gold: California's Natural Resources and the Claim to Realism in Western American Literature "Worden incisively demonstrates that the distance from dime-novel westerns to high literary modernism is much shorter than anyone had supposed. Masculine Style combines brilliant rethinking of 'cowboy masculinity'as supple, unruly, and central to U.S. writers from the Civil War to the Cold Wardazzling re-readings of individual texts, and convincing challenges to conventional cultural hierarchies, literary periods, and field demarcations. This book is a game changer."Christine Bold, author of Selling the Wild West
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book argues for the importance of 'cowboy masculinity,' from late 19th-century dime novels, to the writings of Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, Theodore Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, and Owen Wister, and analyzes the democratic politics of masculinity in American literature and positions the American West as central to modernism.
Main Description
In Masculine Style: The American West and Literary Modernism , Daniel Worden argues for the importance of "cowboy masculinity," as dramatized in late nineteenth-century dime novels, to the writings of Willa Cather, ernest Hemingway, Nat Love, Theodore Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, and Owen Wister . Masculine Style presents a groundbreaking account of masculine self-fashioning in American literature and positions the American West as central to modernism.
Description for Bookstore
An analysis of the representation of masculinity in American literature from dime novels through to the work of Steinbeck which argues for the importance of the concept of 'cowboy masculinity'
Main Description
In Masculine Style: The American West and Literary Modernism, Daniel Worden argues for the importance of "cowboy masculinity," as dramatized in late nineteenth-century dime novels, to the writings of Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, Nat Love, Theodore Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, and Owen Wister. Masculine Style presents a groundbreaking account of masculine self-fashioning in American literature and positions the American West as central to modernism.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Note from the Series Editorsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Masculinity, Modernism, and the Westp. 1
Masculinity for the Million: Gender in Dime-Novel Westernsp. 17
Between Anarchy and Hierarchy: Nat Love's and Theodore Roosevelt's Manly Feelingsp. 35
Marrying Men: Intimacy in Owen Wister's The Virginianp. 57
"I Like to Be Like a Man": Female Masculinity in Willa Cather's O Pioneers! and My Antoniap. 81
A Discipline of Sentiments: Masculinity in Ernest Hemingway's Death in the Afternoonp. 107
Specters of Masculinity: Collectivity in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrathp. 127
Conclusion: "There Never Was a Man Like Shane"p. 143
Notesp. 151
Bibliographyp. 179
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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