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Bureaucracy and race [electronic resource] : native administration in South Africa /
Ivan Evans.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
description
xiii, 403 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520206517 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1997.
isbn
0520206517 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7853398
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 363-382) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Most writing on South Africa--scholarly and otherwise--has concentrated on showing what it meant for Africans to be caught in the web; Evans writes about what it meant to spin it."--Frederick Cooper, editor ofTensions of Empire
Flap Copy
"Most writing on South Africa--scholarly and otherwise--has concentrated on showing what it meant for Africans to be caught in the web; Evans writes about what it meant to spin it."--Frederick Cooper, editor of Tensions of Empire
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-03-01:
The transformation of pre-1948 segregation in South Africa into apartheid was directed from the top, but could hardly have been fashioned into an unusually oppressive instrument of coercion and control without the active cooperation of a legion of officials and civil servants. This fascinating study shows how the relatively African-centered, fusty, paternalist, gradualist, ineffectual Department of Native Administration in South Africa became an Afrikaner-dominated policy organ of an increasingly determined and racist state. Evans explains how the department was reorganized and politicized after 1948, and how the critical shift in emphasis marginalized the holdover, mostly English-speaking, "liberals" in the department. The book contains an important discussion of the administration of the reserves (later to become Bantustans and homelands). It serves as contextual background to the critical report of the Tomlinson Commission (1955), and to some extent indicates why F.R. Tomlinson's energetic and thoughtful blueprint for rural African apartheid was so thoroughly ignored by the politicians who had commissioned it. "Separate development" emerged out of these intellectual and political maneuverings. An excellent, detailed, thoughtful examination of what occurred in rural South Africa during the early years of apartheid, and why. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. I. Rotberg Harvard University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Bureaucracy and Race overturns the common assumption that apartheid in South Africa was enforced only through terror and coercion. Without understating the role of violent intervention, Ivan Evans shows that apartheid was sustained by a great and ever-swelling bureaucracy. The Department of Native Affairs (DNA), which had dwindled during the last years of the segregation regime, unexpectedly revived and became the arrogant, authoritarian fortress of apartheid after 1948. The DNA was a major player in the prolonged exclusion of Africans from citizenship and the establishment of a racially repressive labor market. Exploring the connections between racial domination and bureaucratic growth in South Africa, Evans points out that the DNA's transformation of oppression into "civil administration" institutionalized and, for whites, legitimized a vast, coercive bureaucratic culture, which ensnared millions of Africans in its workings and corrupted the entire state. Evans focuses on certain features of apartheid--the pass system, the "racialization of space" in urban areas, and the cooptation of African chiefs in the Bantustans--in order to make it clear that the state's relentless administration, not its overtly repressive institutions, was the most distinctive feature of South Africa in the 1950s. All observers of South Africa past and present and of totalitarian states in general will follow with interest the story of how the Department of Native Affairs was crucial in transforming "the idea of apartheid" into a persuasive--and all too durable--practice.
Main Description
Bureaucracy and Race overturns the common assumption that apartheid in South Africa was enforced only through terror and coercion. Without understating the role of violent intervention, Ivan Evans shows that apartheid was sustained by a great and ever-swelling bureaucracy. The Department of Native Affairs (DNA), which had dwindled during the last years of the segregation regime, unexpectedly revived and became the arrogant, authoritarian fortress of apartheid after 1948. The DNA was a major player in the prolonged exclusion of Africans from citizenship and the establishment of a racially repressive labor market.Exploring the connections between racial domination and bureaucratic growth in South Africa, Evans points out that the DNAs transformation of oppression into "civil administration" institutionalized and, for whites, legitimized a vast, coercive bureaucratic culture, which ensnared millions of Africans in its workings and corrupted the entire state. Evans focuses on certain features of apartheid -- the pass system, the "racialization of space" in urban areas, and the cooptation of African chiefs in the Bantustans -- in order to make it clear that the states relentless administration, not its overtly repressive institutions, was the most distinctive feature of South Africa in the 1950s.All observers of South Africa past and present and of totalitarian states in general will follow with interest the story of how the Department of Native Affairs was crucial in transforming "the idea of apartheid" into a persuasive -- and all too durable -- practice.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
List of Ministers of Native Affairs, 1910-60p. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Urban Administration
Ambivalent Intervention: Urban Administration in the Interwar Yearsp. 25
Reviving the Department of Native Affairsp. 56
Corrupting the State: Urban Labor Controlsp. 86
The "Properly Planned Location"p. 119
Administration in the Reserves
Ideology and Administration in the Transkeip. 163
The Bastardization of Authority: Administration and Civil Society in the Transkeip. 190
From Native Administration to Bantu Administrationp. 224
The Vulgarization of Authority and Rural Revolt: The Transkei, 1955-60p. 246
Conclusion: Native Administration and State Formationp. 277
Notesp. 307
Selected Bibliographyp. 363
Indexp. 383
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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