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Virtue and reason in Plato and Aristotle /
A.W. Price.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, c2011.
description
xii, 356 p. ; 24 cm
ISBN
0199609616 (hbk.), 9780199609611 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, c2011.
isbn
0199609616 (hbk.)
9780199609611 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7839220
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages [317]-329) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jacket illustration: Allegory of Virtue and Vice, c. 1580, by Paolo Veronese. New York, The Frick Collection. ? 2010 DeAgostini Picture Library/Scala, Florence.
Reviews
Review Quotes
for those interested in ancient ethics and moral psychology, Virtue and Reason is a treasure trove of enlightening commentary, insightful arguments, and a keen view of the most important and perennial aspects of Plato's and Aristotle's genius.
[This] book demonstrates an incomparable knowledge of both the original texts and the contemporary literature at every turn.
"Virtue and Reasonis a treasure trove of enlightening commentary, insightful arguments, and a keen view of the most important and perennial aspects of Plato's and Aristotle's genius."--Dimitrios Dentsoras,Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Price explores the views of Plato and Aristotle on how virtue of character and practical reasoning enable agents to achieve eudaimonia - the state of living or acting well. He provides a philosophical analysis and argues that the perennial question of action within human life is central to the reflections of ancient philosophers.
Long Description
In this authoritative discussion of the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, A. W. Price considers four related areas: eudaimonia, or living and acting well, as the ultimate end of action; virtues of character in relation to the emotions, and to one another; practical reasoning, especially from an end to ways or means; and acrasia, or action that is contrary to the agent's own judgement of what is best. The focal concept is that of eudaimonia, which both Plato andAristotle view as an abstract goal that is valuable enough to motivate action. Virtue has a double role to play in making its achievement possible, both in proposing subordinate ends apt to the context, and in protecting the agent against temptations to discard them too easily. For both purposes, Price suggests thatvirtues need to form a unity--but one that can be conceived in various ways. Among the tasks of deliberation is to work out how, and whether, to pursue some putative end in context. Aristotle returns to early Plato in finding it problematic that one should consciously sacrifice acting well to some incidental attraction; Plato later finds this possible by postulating schism within the soul. Price maintains that it is their emphasis upon the centrality of action within human life that makesthe reflections of these ancient philosophers perennially relevant.
Main Description
In this authoritative discussion of the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, A. W. Price considers four related areas: eudaimonia , or living and acting well, as the ultimate end of action; virtues of character in relation to the emotions, and to one another; practical reasoning, especially from an end to ways or means; and acrasia, or action that is contrary to the agent's own judgement of what is best. The focal concept is that of eudaimonia , which both Plato and Aristotle view as an abstract goal that is valuable enough to motivate action. Virtue has a double role to play in making its achievement possible, both in proposing subordinate ends apt to the context, and in protecting the agent against temptations to discard them too easily. For both purposes, Price suggests that virtues need to form a unity--but one that can be conceived in various ways. Among the tasks of deliberation is to work out how, and whether, to pursue some putative end in context. Aristotle returns to early Plato in finding it problematic that one should consciously sacrifice acting well to some incidental attraction; Plato later finds this possible by postulating schism within the soul. Price maintains that it is their emphasis upon the centrality of action within human life that makes the reflections of these ancient philosophers perennially relevant.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Eudaimonia
Plato on Eudaimoniap. 9
Doing and Living Wellp. 9
The Final End of Action and Desirep. 23
Aristotle on Eudaimoniap. 33
Two Conceptions of eudaimoniap. 33
Eudaimonia and its Componentsp. 42
'In a Complete Life'p. 54
Some Further Questionsp. 58
Intellectual Contemplationp. 69
Conclusionp. 80
Virtue
Plato on Virtuep. 85
The Unity of Virtuep. 85
Virtue and Emotionp. 94
Desires and Emotions in the Republicp. 100
The Republic on the Virtuesp. 106
Aristotle on Virtuep. 113
The Emotionsp. 113
The Virtues and the Meanp. 122
Making Sense of the Meanp. 127
The Unity of the Virtuesp. 134
Conclusionp. 143
Practical Reasoning
Plato on Practical Reasoningp. 149
Practical Inference in the Lysis and Gorgiasp. 149
Practical Inference from the Gorgias to the Menop. 159
Means-End Reasoning in the Republicp. 166
Principlesp. 174
Measurementp. 180
Aristotle on Practical Reasoningp. 189
What is Practical Thinking?p. 189
Practical Thinking and Actionp. 195
Against eudaimonia as a Grand Endp. 200
Principlesp. 206
The Ends of Deliberationp. 209
Deliberation and Intuitionp. 221
Is Deliberation of Ends?p. 226
tBroadie and McDowellp. 230
The Practical Syllogismp. 236
Should Practical Inference be Deductive?p. 246
Acrasia
Plato on Acrasiap. 253
Acrasia in the Protagorasp. 253
How Plausible is the Protagoras!p. 264
Acrasia in the Republicp. 269
Aristotle on Acrasiap. 281
An Aristotelian Account that is not Aristotle'sp. 281
Aristotle's Accountp. 283
Two Difficultiesp. 298
A Consideration of Alternativesp. 302
Eudaimonia Revisitedp. 311
Referencesp. 317
Index Locorum of Plato and Aristotlep. 331
Index Nominump. 347
Subject Indexp. 350
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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