Catalogue


Young offenders : juvenile delinquency from 1700 to 2000 /
by Pamela Horn.
imprint
Stroud, Gloucestershire : Amberley, 2010.
description
280 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1848688806 (hbk.), 9781848688803 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Stroud, Gloucestershire : Amberley, 2010.
isbn
1848688806 (hbk.)
9781848688803 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7838141
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [269]-276) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the early 21st century juvenile crime has become a matter of widespread social & political concern & debate. 'Young Offenders' examines the way in which attitudes, & the law itself, have evolved in dealing with juvenile wrongdoing from the early 18th century to the end of the 20th.
Main Description
In the early twenty-first century, juvenile crime has become a matter of widespread social and political concern and debate. Young Offenders examines the way in which attitudes and the law itself have evolved in dealing with juvenile wrongdoing from the early eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth. By the use of court and prison records, parliamentary papers, newspapers, the writings of reformers and other records, such as those covering transportation and life in the overseas penal colonies, it considers the way in which the punishment of the young and the definition of delinquency itself have developed. The gender difference between boys' misdeeds, often involving theft and violence, and girls' offences, which frequently relate to sexual and moral matters, is also considered. The book shows how attempts at reforming offenders by the creation of purpose built institutions have met with disillusion and discouragement and have been followed by a reversion to harsher treatment. The reminiscences of youngsters who have passed through the criminal justice system over the years add a personal dimension to the debate. Juvenile delinquency became a subject of special interest and concern to the wider public from the late nineteenth century; in this connection, Young Offenders considers the validity of current claims that British society is 'broken' because of the activities of a few young thugs. As is pointed out, there has never been a 'golden age' of order and security of the kind some nostalgic commentators suggest.
Main Description
In the early twenty first century juvenile crime has become a matter of widespread social and political concern and debate. Young Offenders examines the way in which attitudes and the law itself have evolved in dealing with juvenile wrongdoing from th
Main Description
In the early twenty first century juvenile crime has become a matter of widespread social and political concern and debate. Young Offenders examines the way in which attitudes and the law itself have evolved in dealing with juvenile wrongdoing from the early eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth. By the use of court and prison records, parliamentary papers, newspapers, the writings of reformers and other records, such as those covering transportation and life in the overseas penal colonies, it considers the way in which the punishment of the young and the definition of delinquency itself have developed. The gender difference between boys' misdeeds, often involving theft and violence, and girls' offending, which frequently relates to sexual and moral matters, is also considered. The book shows how attempts at reforming offenders by the creation of purpose-built institutions have met with disillusion and discouragement and have been followed by a reversion to harsher treatment. The reminisces of youngsters who have passed through the criminal justice system over the years adds a personal dimension to the debate. Juvenile delinquency became a subject of special interest and concern to the wider public from the late nineteenth century; in this connection the book considers the validity of current claims that British society is 'broken' because of the activities of a few young thugs. As is pointed out, there has never been a 'golden age' of order and security of the kind some nostalgic commentators suggest.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. 7
The Rise of Juvenile Delinquencyp. 9
Eighteenth-Century Attitudes to Youth Crimep. 9
The Agencies of Reformp. 21
The Analysis of Child Offendingp. 29
The Role of Public Punishments and Imprisonment: 1700-1830sp. 35
Public Punishmentsp. 35
The Role of Imprisonmentp. 46
The Hulksp. 59
The Overseas Dimension: 1700-1840sp. 67
Transportationp. 67
Life in Australiap. 79
Colonial Emigrationp. 88
The Spirit of Reform: 1840-1900p. 97
The Juvenile Offenders Act, 1847p. 97
Reformatory and Industrial Schoolsp. 105
The Problems of School Attendancep. 123
New Offences and New Remedies, 1880-1914p. 133
Street Offences and Street Gangsp. 133
Female moralityp. 146
New Remediesp. 157
War and Peace: 1914-1938p. 167
Juvenile offending in the First World Warp. 167
The inter war years: 1919-1938p. 179
The Second World War and its aftermath: 1939-1990sp. 195
The Second World War: 1939-1945p. 195
The Post-War World: 1945-1990sp. 211
Conclusionp. 233
Endnotesp. 235
Bibliographyp. 269
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem