Catalogue


The Zong : a massacre, the law and the end of slavery /
James Walvin.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2011.
description
xi, 248 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0300125550 (hbk.), 9780300125559 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2011.
isbn
0300125550 (hbk.)
9780300125559 (hbk.)
contents note
A painting and a ship -- The city built on slavery -- Crews and captives -- The making of the Zong -- All at sea -- An open secret -- In the eyes of the law -- A matter of necessity -- In the wake of the Zong -- Abolition and after -- Remembering the Zong.
catalogue key
7838097
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Believing his ship was off course - and lacking enough drinking water to last until landfall - Captain Collingwood of the British ship Zong commanded his crew to throw overboard one-third of its cargo: a shipment of Africans bound for slavery in America. This book examines the deplorable killings of the Zong.
Main Description
On November 29, 1781, Captain Collingwood of the British ship Zong commanded his crew to throw overboard one-third of his cargo: a shipment of Africans bound for slavery in America. The captain believed his ship was off course, and he feared there was not enough drinking water to last until landfall. This book is the first to examine in detail the deplorable killings on the Zong , the lawsuit that ensued, how the murder of 132 slaves affected debates about slavery, and the way we remember the infamous Zong today. Historian James Walvin explores all aspects of the Zong 's voyage and the subsequent triala case brought to court not for the murder of the slaves but as a suit against the insurers who denied the owners' claim that their "cargo" had been necessarily jettisoned. The scandalous case prompted wide debate and fueled Britain's awakening abolition movement. Without the episode of the Zong , Walvin contends, the process of ending the slave trade would have taken an entirely different moral and political trajectory. He concludes with a fascinating discussion of how the case of the Zong , though unique in the history of slave ships, has come to be understood as typical of life on all such ships.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations and Mapsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. x
A painting, and a slave shipp. 1
The city built on slaveryp. 12
Crews and captivesp. 27
The making of the Zongp. 56
All at seap. 76
An open secretp. 102
In the eyes of the lawp. 117
A matter of necessityp. 138
In the wake of the Zongp. 160
Abolition and afterp. 181
Remembing the Zongp. 206
Notesp. 216
Further Readingp. 236
Indexp. 240
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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