Catalogue


Competing voices from the Russian Revolution /
edited by Michael C. Hickey.
imprint
Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2011.
description
xiii, 599 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0313385238 (alk. paper), 9780313385230 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
series title
imprint
Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2011.
isbn
0313385238 (alk. paper)
9780313385230 (alk. paper)
contents note
Pt. 1. The context of World War One -- The war and political elites -- The war and ordinary people -- pt. 2. February-July 1917 -- Responses to the February Revolution -- What the Revolution means to me, part I : soldiers, workers, professionals, industrialists, and students -- What the Revolution means to me, part II : clergy, peasants, aristocratic landowners, women, and national and religious minorities -- Flash points of conflict: The April crisis -- Flash points of conflict: The June offensive and the July days -- pt. 3. July-October 1917 -- Two provincial stories -- Perceptions of crisis in summer and early fall -- Flash points of conflict: The Kornilov Rebellion -- Electoral politics : campaigns for local dumas and the Constituent Assembly -- The Soviets and the constitution of state power in September and October -- pt. 4. The first months of Soviet rule, October 1917-January 1918 -- Flash points of conflict: The October Revolution and creation of a Bolshevik government -- Flash points of conflict: The Constituent Assembly -- Endmatter.
catalogue key
7837054
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 583-588) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-08-01:
This volume is an amazing collection of more than 200 primary source documents from the period of the Russian Revolution, all translated into English and placed in historical context. Editor Hickey asserts that 70 percent of the works in the volume have never been translated into English before; he undertook all of the translation to give the book a consistent tone. What is special about the works included is not only that many are archival documents, but also the kinds of pieces they are: soldiers' letters, antiwar student leaflets, petitions from women's groups, and political propaganda from all sides. Readers get a broad perspective on the Revolution as it happened--from political elites, from provincial student and peasant groups, and from newspapers in far corners of the Russian Empire. Hickey sets the stage with an overview of the situation in Russia prior to the Revolution, and begins the documents in 1914 with WW I. A brief introduction, along with some context, accompanies each document. Short essays that introduce each part of the volume provide additional context. Hickey even gives background about language and usage that readers might not catch in a casual reading, adding additional layers to the complex view of the Revolution portrayed here. The translations are arranged both chronologically and thematically, ending with the collapse of the Constituent Assembly in 1918. Enhancing the text are a useful chronology of events and a biographical glossary. This reviewer's only complaint is that the collection ends too soon. A similar second volume on the Russian Civil War would be most welcome. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty/researchers. T. Miller Michigan State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Michael Hickey's new book is the most substantial attempt thus far to convey the rich range of views that existed during Russia's turbulent revolutionary period. It should be an essential part of any student module on the subject and many of the sources will force specialists to rethink their views on particular groups and episodes." - Revolutionary Russia
"This volume is an amazing collection of more than 200 primary source documents from the period of the Russian Revolution, all translated into English and placed in historical context. ...Summing Up: Highly recommended." - Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, April 2011
Choice, August 2011
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Summaries
Description for Reader
Highlights themes that have emerged as important to recent historiography, such as the relationship between World War I and the 1917 Revolution, provincial revolutionary affairs, and the complexity of party politics Illuminates the views of political leaders (Lenin, Trotsky, Kerensy), but also of ordinary people from all strata of Russian society and from across the vast Russian empire Organizes documents chronologically and thematically to facilitate understanding of flash points of conflictkey issues and events that became the focus of heated public discussion and debate
Long Description
How better to understand history than through the words of those who lived it? Competing Voices from the Russian Revolution: Fighting WordS≪/i> presents documents that underscore the extraordinary richness of public discussion about key events and issues during the 1917 Russian Revolution, one of the pivotal events in modern history. Carefully edited and annotated, the documents help clarify the issues while revealing the broad range of ways in which Russians understood the events unfolding around them. Focusing on public rhetoric and debate in Russia from the outbreak of World War I in 1914 through the dissolution of the Constituent Assembly in January 1918, the documents present the views not only of key political figures, but also of ordinary men and womenmothers, soldiers, factory workers, peasants, students, businesspeople, and educated professionals.
Long Description
How better to understand history than through the words of those who lived it? Competing Voices from the Russian Revolution: Fighting Words presents documents that underscore the extraordinary richness of public discussion about key events and issues during the 1917 Russian Revolution, one of the pivotal events in modern history. Carefully edited and annotated, the documents help clarify the issues while revealing the broad range of ways in which Russians understood the events unfolding around them. Focusing on public rhetoric and debate in Russia from the outbreak of World War I in 1914 through the dissolution of the Constituent Assembly in January 1918, the documents present the views not only of key political figures, but also of ordinary men and womenmothers, soldiers, factory workers, peasants, students, businesspeople, and educated professionals.
Long Description
How better to understand history than through the words of those who lived it? Competing Voices from the Russian Revolution: Fighting Words presents documents that underscore the extraordinary richness of public discussion about key events and issues during the 1917 Russian Revolution, one of the pivotal events in modern history. Carefully edited and annotated, the documents help clarify the issues while revealing the broad range of ways in which Russians understood the events unfolding around them.Focusing on public rhetoric and debate in Russia from the outbreak of World War I in 1914 through the dissolution of the Constituent Assembly in January 1918, the documents present the views not only of key political figures, but also of ordinary men and womenmothers, soldiers, factory workers, peasants, students, businesspeople, and educated professionals.
Main Description
The Romanovs ruled Russia from 1613 to 1917, so it is no wonder that the overthrow of this long-lived dynasty and the events that followed evoked passionate debate. The Russian Revolution of 1917 was followed by the Russian Civil War, pitting ôRedö against ôWhiteö and, ultimately, resulting in the establishment of the Soviet Union. How did people react? What did they think?
Description for Reader
More than 300 original documents from the national and local press and from unpublished provincial archival materials, all carefully edited and annotated and either translated into English for the first time or presented in new translations A chronology of major events in Russia for the period from summer 1914 to mid-January 1918 Cartoons that appeared in the national and local press in 1917 A map of Russia in 1917 showing the locations of important cities and geographical features
Description for Reader
* Highlights themes that have emerged as important to recent historiography, such as the relationship between World War I and the 1917 Revolution, provincial revolutionary affairs, and the complexity of party politics * Illuminates the views of political leaders (Lenin, Trotsky, Kerensy), but also of ordinary people from all strata of Russian society and from across the vast Russian empire * Organizes documents chronologically and thematically to facilitate understanding of flash points of conflictkey issues and events that became the focus of heated public discussion and debate
Table of Contents
Series Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
The Context of World War Ip. 1
The War and Political Elitesp. 19
The War and Ordinary Peoplep. 43
February-July 1917p. 63
Responses to the February Revolutionp. 83
What the Revolution Means to Me, Part I: Soldiers, Workers, Professionals, Industrialists, and Studentsp. 117
What the Revolution Means to Me, Part II: Clergy, Peasants, Aristocratic Landowners, Women, and National and Religious Minoritiesp. 147
Flash Points of Conflict: The April Crisisp. 117
Flash Points of Conflict: The June Offensive and the July Daysp. 225
July-October 1917p. 263
Two Provincial Storiesp. 277
Perceptions of Crisis in Summer and Early Fallp. 303
Flash Points of Conflict: The Kornilov Rebellionp. 341
Electoral Politics: Campaigns for Local Dumas and the Constituent Assemblyp. 371
The Soviets and the Constitution of State Power in September and Octoberp. 405
The First Months of Soviet Rule, October I917-January 1918p. 447
Flash Points of Conflict: the October Revolution and Creation of a Bolshevik Governmentp. 461
Flash Points of Conflict: the Constituent Assemblyp. 497
End Matterp. 529
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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