Catalogue


Apollo's lyre [electronic resource] : Greek music and music theory in antiquity and the Middle Ages /
Thomas J. Mathiesen.
imprint
Lincoln, Neb. : University of Nebraska Press, c1999.
description
xv, 806 p. : ill., 3 maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0803230796 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln, Neb. : University of Nebraska Press, c1999.
isbn
0803230796 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes indexes.
catalogue key
7833623
 
The bibliography (p. 669-783), intended to be comprehensive for the field, updates and expands: A bibliography of sources for the study of ancient Greek music / Thomas J. Mathiesen. Hackensack, N.J. : J. Boonin, 1974.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Thomas J. Mathiesen is David H. Jacobs Distinguished Professor of Music and director of the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature at Indiana University.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is an important work, indispensable for anyone wishing to approach the field of ancient Greek music." Journal of the American Musicological Society
"All in all, Apollo's Lyre is essential reading for all those interested in Greek music and music theory."--Early Music, August 2001
"Apollo''s Lyreis essential reading for all those interested in Greek music and music theory."Leofranc Holford-Strevens,Early Music.
"Apollo's Lyreis essential reading for all those interested in Greek music and music theory."-Leofranc Holford-Strevens,Early Music.
" Apollo's Lyreis essential reading for all those interested in Greek music and music theory."Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Early Music
"Apollo''s Lyreis magisterial, encyclopedic, elegantly written, perfectly edited, temperate in its tone, and meticulous in its argument. Further, its rich documentation in translation and in the original Greek gives it the highest credibility. . . . One of its principal strengths [is] the presentation of subject matters from the ancient sources in their original order an from their original viewpoint. This feature, aided by the author''s trenchant commentary, will permit readers repeatedly to engage the primary testimony and to construct their own narratives from it in accordance with changing scholarly and pedagogical agendas. Such a book is destined to become a basic reference and an indispensable foundation for advanced competence in the field of ancient Greek music for decades to come."Music Theory Spectrum
"Apollo's Lyreis magisterial, encyclopedic, elegantly written, perfectly edited, temperate in its tone, and meticulous in its argument. Further, its rich documentation in translation and in the original Greek gives it the highest credibility. . . . One of its principal strengths [is] the presentation of subject matters from the ancient sources in their original order an from their original viewpoint. This feature, aided by the author's trenchant commentary, will permit readers repeatedly to engage the primary testimony and to construct their own narratives from it in accordance with changing scholarly and pedagogical agendas. Such a book is destined to become a basic reference and an indispensable foundation for advanced competence in the field of ancient Greek music for decades to come."-Music Theory Spectrum
" Apollo's Lyreis magisterial, encyclopedic, elegantly written, perfectly edited, temperate in its tone, and meticulous in its argument. Further, its rich documentation in translation and in the original Greek gives it the highest credibility. . . . One of its principal strengths [is] the presentation of subject matters from the ancient sources in their original order an from their original viewpoint. This feature, aided by the author's trenchant commentary, will permit readers repeatedly to engage the primary testimony and to construct their own narratives from it in accordance with changing scholarly and pedagogical agendas. Such a book is destined to become a basic reference and an indispensable foundation for advanced competence in the field of ancient Greek music for decades to come." Music Theory Spectrum
"This is an important work, indispensable for anyone wishing to approach the field of ancient Greek music."-Journal of the American Musicological Society
"This is an important work, indispensable for anyone wishing to approach the field of ancient Greek music."Journal of the American Musicological Society
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Ancient Greek music and music theory has fascinated scholars for centuries not only because of its intrinsic interest as a part of ancient Greek culture but also because the Greeks' grand concept of music has continued to stimulate musical imaginations to the present day. Unlike earlier treatments of the subject, Apollo's Lyreis aimed principally at the reader interested in the musical typologies, the musical instruments, and especially the historical development of music theory and its transmission through the Middle Ages. The basic method and scope of the study are set out in a preliminary chapter, followed by two chapters concentrating on the role of music in Greek society, musical typology, organology, and performance practice. The next chapters are devoted to the music theory itself, as it developed in three stages: in the treatises of Aristoxenus and the Sectio canonis; during the period of revival in the second century C.E.; and in late antiquity. Each theorist and treatise is considered separately but always within the context of the emerging traditions. The theory provides a remarkably complete and coherent system for explaining and analyzing musical phenomena, and a great deal of its conceptual framework, as well as much of its terminology, was borrowed and adapted by medieval Latin, Byzantine, and Arabic music theorists, a legacy reviewed in the final chapter. Transcriptions and analyses of some of the more complete pieces of Greek music preserved on papyrus or stone, or in manuscript, are integrated with a consideration of the musicopoetic types themselves. The book concludes with a comprehensive bibliography for the field, updating and expanding the author's earlier Bibliography of Sources for the Study of Ancient Greek Music.
Main Description
Ancient Greek music and music theory has fascinated scholars for centuries not only because of its intrinsic interest as a part of ancient Greek culture but also because the Greeks' grand concept of music has continued to stimulate musical imaginations to the present day. Unlike earlier treatments of the subject,Apollo's Lyreis aimed principally at the reader interested in the musical typologies, the musical instruments, and especially the historical development of music theory and its transmission through the Middle Ages. The basic method and scope of the study are set out in a preliminary chapter, followed by two chapters concentrating on the role of music in Greek society, musical typology, organology, and performance practice. The next chapters are devoted to the music theory itself, as it developed in three stages: in the treatises of Aristoxenus and the Sectio canonis; during the period of revival in the second century C.E.; and in late antiquity. Each theorist and treatise is considered separately but always within the context of the emerging traditions. The theory provides a remarkably complete and coherent system for explaining and analyzing musical phenomena, and a great deal of its conceptual framework, as well as much of its terminology, was borrowed and adapted by medieval Latin, Byzantine, and Arabic music theorists, a legacy reviewed in the final chapter. Transcriptions and analyses of some of the more complete pieces of Greek music preserved on papyrus or stone, or in manuscript, are integrated with a consideration of the musicopoetic types themselves. The book concludes with a comprehensive bibliography for the field, updating and expanding the author's earlierBibliography of Sources for the Study of Ancient Greek Music.
Main Description
Ancient Greek music and music theory has fascinated scholars for centuries not only because of its intrinsic interest as a part of ancient Greek culture but also because the Greeks' grand concept of music has continued to stimulate musical imaginations to the present day. Unlike earlier treatments of the subject, 'Apollo's lyre' is aimed principally at the reader interested in the musical typologies, the musical instruments, and especially the historical development of music theory and its transmission through the Middle Ages.The basic method and scope of the study are set out in a preliminary chapter, followed by two chapters concentrating on the role of music in Greek society, musical typology, organology, and performance practice. The next chapters are devoted to the music theory itself, as it developed in three stages: in the treatises of Aristoxenus and the Sectio canonis; during the period of revival in the second century C.E.; and in late antiquity. Each theorist and treatise is considered separately but always within the context of the emerging traditions. The theory provides a remarkably complete and coherent system for explaining and analyzing musical phenomena, and a great deal of its conceptual framework, as well as much of its terminology, was borrowed and adapted by medieval Latin, Byzantine, and Arabic music theorists, a legacy reviewed in the final chapter. Transcriptions and analyses of some of the more complete pieces of Greek music preserved on papyrus or stone, or in manuscript, are integrated with a consideration of the musicopoetic types themselves. The book concludes with a comprehensive bibliography for the field, updating and expanding the author's earlier Bibliography of Sources for the Study of Ancient Greek Music.Thomas J. Mathiesen is David H. Jacobs Distinguished Professor of Music and director of the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature at Indiana University.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 1
Overview and Sourcesp. 6
Literaturep. 7
Graphic and Plastic Artp. 11
Archaeological Remainsp. 12
Notated Musical Compositionsp. 12
Methodologyp. 13
Musical Life in Ancient Greecep. 23
Music and Melosp. 23
Types of Music and Their Functionp. 29
Music for the Godsp. 29
Hymnp. 29
Paeanp. 36
Nomosp. 58
Dithyrambp. 71
Prosodionp. 81
Partheneiap. 83
Hyporchemep. 88
Music in the Theatrep. 94
Music for the Mortalsp. 125
Hymenaios and epithalamionp. 126
Threnodyp. 131
Epinikion and encomiump. 135
Skolion and sillosp. 141
Miscellaneous types, military music, and folk songp. 151
Musical Instrumentsp. 159
Idiophones and Membranophonesp. 162
Krotalap. 163
Kroupezai or Kroupalap. 166
Kumbala or Krembalap. 170
Seistron and Rhombosp. 172
Rhoptron and Tumpanap. 173
Aerophonesp. 176
Aulosp. 177
Origin and historyp. 178
Construction and typesp. 182
Reedsp. 198
Reconstruction and performance practicep. 204
Syrinxp. 222
Hydraulisp. 225
Salpinx and Hornp. 230
Chordophonesp. 234
Origin, History, and Typesp. 235
Lyresp. 237
Chelysp. 237
Constructionp. 238
Tuning and the number of stringsp. 243
Performance practice and the plectrump. 247
Social functionp. 248
Barbitosp. 249
Phorminxp. 253
Kitharap. 258
Psalteriap. 270
Psalterion and epigoneionp. 270
Magadis, pektis, and phoenixp. 272
Trigonon and sambukep. 275
The Apulian instrumentp. 280
The pandoura and skindapsosp. 283
Music Theory I: The Sources, Aristoxenus, and the Sectio canonisp. 287
Overview of the Sourcesp. 291
Aristoxenusp. 294
Harmonicap. 295
De principiisp. 300
Elementa harmonicap. 319
Rhythmicap. 334
The Sectio Canonisp. 344
Music Theory II: The Revivalp. 355
Plutarchp. 355
Cleonidesp. 366
Nicomachus of Gerasap. 390
Manuale harmonicesp. 393
Manuale harmonicump. 406
Theon of Smyrnap. 412
Claudius Ptolemyp. 429
Music Theory III: Late Antiquityp. 497
Gaudentiusp. 498
Porphyriusp. 509
Aristides Quintilianusp. 521
Bacchiusp. 583
Alypiusp. 593
The Tradition in the Middle Agesp. 609
Bibliographyp. 669
Index of Namesp. 785
Index of Places and Subjectsp. 795
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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