Catalogue


Albion and Jerusalem [electronic resource] : the Anglo-Jewish community in the post-emancipation era /
Michael Clark.
imprint
Oxford : University Press, c2009.
description
x, 308 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780199562343
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford : University Press, c2009.
isbn
9780199562343
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Establishment and emancipation: the formation of Anglo-Jewish identity, 1656--1858 -- Position and politics: the first Jewish MPs -- Representation, coordination, and civilization: the Board of Deputies of British Jews and communal government -- Faith and form: Anglo-Jewish religion -- Immigrants and exhibitions: expanding the boundaries of British Jewry.
catalogue key
7828146
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [281]-302) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A masterful survey of the Anglo-Jewish community during a momentous period in its development from which modern British scoiety with its huge influx of immigrants can learn a number of lessons."--Hyam Corney, Jerusalem Post
"A masterful survey of the Anglo-Jewish community during a momentous period in its development from which modern British scoiety with its huge influx of immigrants can learn a number of lessons."--Hyam Corney,Jerusalem Post
"A masterful survey of the Anglo-Jewish community during a momentous period in its development from which modern British scoiety with its huge influx of immigrants can learn a number of lessons."--Hyam Corney,Jerusalem Post "[An] outstanding work...Clark's work is arguably the most sophisticated and intelligent account we currently have of this topic." -- British Scholar "An informative and carefully argued book." --Journal of British Studies
a painstaking forensic examination of a hitherto relatively neglected period in Anglo-Jewish history
Clark's work is arguably the most sophisticate and intelligent account we currently have of this topic.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Clark explores the dilemmas of identity and inter-faith relations that confronted Jews in late Victorian Britain, after their campaign for equal rights. This was a crucial period in which the Anglo-Jewish community shaped the basis of its modern existence, whilst the British state explored the limits of its toleration.
Main Description
Lionel de Rothschild's hard-fought entry into Parliament in 1858 marked the emancipation of Jews in Britain - the symbolic conclusion of Jews' campaign for equal rights and their inclusion as citizens after centuries of discrimination. Jewish life entered a new phase: the post-emancipationera. But what did this mean for the Jewish community and their interactions with wider society? And how did Britain's state and society react to its newest citizens?Emancipation was ambiguous. Acceptance carried expectations, as well as opportunities. Integrating into British society required changes to traditional Jewish identity, just as it also widened conceptions of Britishness. Many Jews willingly embraced their environment and fashioned a unique Jewishexistence: mixing in all levels of society; experiencing economic success; and organising and translating its faith along Anglican grounds. However, unlike many other European Jews, Anglo-Jews stayed loyal to their faith. Conversion and outmarriage remained rare, and connections were maintained withforeign kin. The community was even willing at times to place its Jewish and English identity in conflict, as happened during the 1876-8 Eastern Crisis - which provoked the first episode of modern antisemitism in Britain.The nature of Jewish existence in Britain was unclear and developing in the post-emancipation era. Focusing upon inter-linked case studies of Anglo-Jewry's political activity, internal government, and religious development, Michael Clark explores the dilemmas of identity and inter-faith relationsthat confronted the minority in late nineteenth-century Britain. This was a crucial period in which the Anglo-Jewish community shaped the basis of its modern existence, whilst the British state explored the limits of its toleration.
Main Description
Lionel de Rothschild's hard-fought entry into Parliament in 1858 marked the emancipation of Jews in Britain--the symbolic conclusion of Jews' campaign for equal rights and their inclusion as citizens after centuries of discrimination. Jewish life entered a new phase: the post-emancipation era. But what did this mean for the Jewish community and their interactions with wider society? And how did Britain's state and society react to its newest citizens? Emancipation was ambiguous. Acceptance carried expectations, as well as opportunities. Integrating into British society required changes to traditional Jewish identity, just as it also widened conceptions of Britishness. Many Jews willingly embraced their environment and fashioned a unique Jewish existence: mixing in all levels of society; experiencing economic success; and organising and translating its faith along Anglican grounds. However, unlike many other European Jews, Anglo-Jews stayed loyal to their faith. Conversion and outmarriage remained rare, and connections were maintained with foreign kin. The community was even willing at times to place its Jewish and English identity in conflict, as happened during the 1876-8 Eastern Crisis--which provoked the first episode of modern antisemitism in Britain. The nature of Jewish existence in Britain was unclear and developing in the post-emancipation era. Focusing upon inter-linked case studies of Anglo-Jewry's political activity, internal government, and religious development, Michael Clark explores the dilemmas of identity and inter-faith relations that confronted the minority in late nineteenth-century Britain. This was a crucial period in which the Anglo-Jewish community shaped the basis of its modern existence, whilst the British state explored the limits of its toleration.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Emancipation and the Modern Jewish Identity
Establishment and Emancipation: The Formation of Anglo-Jewish Identity, 1656-1858
Position and Politics: The First Jewish MPs
Representation, Coordination and Civilisation: The Board of Deputies of British Jews and Communal Government
Faith and Form: Anglo-Jewish Religion
Immigrants and Exhibitions: Expanding the Boundaries of British Jewry
Conclusion: Post-Emancipation Anglo-Jewry
Appendices
Glossary
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem