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Afghanistan [electronic resource] : the Soviet invasion and the Afghan response, 1979-1982 /
M. Hassan Kakar.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
description
x, 380 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520085914 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
isbn
0520085914 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7826824
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 357-364) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The times Kakar writes about have . . . pervasively influenced every life in Afghanistan. . . . He was continuously faced with different versions of the Afghan experience as his country went through one of the great cataclysms of its history. We are fortunate to have his account."--Robert Canfield, editor ofTurko-Persia in Historical Perspective "This is the first history of recent events in Afghanistan by a native historian trained in London. Kakar writes objectively about the Soviets, the Afghan government, and the Mujahideen. With personal observations, including years spent in Kabul's notorious Pul-i Charkhi prison, this book is unique in revealing many events hitherto not known or recorded. It will remain a standard work on . . . contemporary Afghanistan."--Richard N. Frye, Harvard University "Kakar, one of Afghanistan's most distinguished scholars, has provided an outstanding account of a complex and interesting phase of modern Afghanistan history. . . . A fascinating and absorbing analysis . . . exhaustive and most valuable."--Vartan Gregorian, President, Brown University
Flap Copy
"The times Kakar writes about have . . . pervasively influenced every life in Afghanistan. . . . He was continuously faced with different versions of the Afghan experience as his country went through one of the great cataclysms of its history. We are fortunate to have his account."--Robert Canfield, editor of Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective "This is the first history of recent events in Afghanistan by a native historian trained in London. Kakar writes objectively about the Soviets, the Afghan government, and the Mujahideen. With personal observations, including years spent in Kabul's notorious Pul-i Charkhi prison, this book is unique in revealing many events hitherto not known or recorded. It will remain a standard work on . . . contemporary Afghanistan."--Richard N. Frye, Harvard University "Kakar, one of Afghanistan's most distinguished scholars, has provided an outstanding account of a complex and interesting phase of modern Afghanistan history. . . . A fascinating and absorbing analysis . . . exhaustive and most valuable."--Vartan Gregorian, President, Brown University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1995-10-15:
The Soviet ten-year debacle (1979-89) in Afghanistan has generated a growing literature represented recently by Diego Cordovez and Selig Harrison's Out of Afghanistan (LJ 5/15/95) and now by Kakar's sophisticated analysis. The author is a well-respected Afghan historian who has published several volumes detailing Afghan history and who spent five years in a Kabul prison for his outspoken opposition to the Soviet occupation. From someone who has for years lived and studied Afghan society, culture, and politics, readers gain a deeper understanding of the complex issues that led to this conflict. Especially useful is the author's appendix, which contains short biographies of all the major Afghan participants. Kakar sadly relates that by the time the Soviets withdrew in 1989, "every ninth Afghan had died, every seventh (or eighth) has been disabled, every third had fled abroad." How much of this episode contributed to the ultimate demise of the Soviet Union is open to debate. What remains clear, however, is that it was a tragedy in every sense of the word. From Kakar the true horror of this unfortunate conflict is revealed. Recommended for all collections.‘Ed Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1995-12:
Kakar, (history, Kabul Univ.) imprisoned from 1982 to 1987 for opposing the 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, has written a political history of the country. A combination of personal journals, recollections, and research, the book covers the period from the overthrow of the Afghan monarchy in 1973 to 1994. The text is detailed and passionate, yet draws no definitive conclusions. What was the real reason for the Afghan tragedy? How could it have been avoided? Was the invasion a continuation of the "Great Game," an episode in the Cold War, an attempt to control a strategic location, or the misguided idealism of certain educated professionals and intellectuals who dragged in the Soviets? The treachery of the Soviets and the pro-Soviet Afghan leaders as well as the gallantry of the resistance are well reported. So are the pillage and rape in urban areas by the victorious resistance fighters. Even the deposed king is criticized for not returning to restore stability unless the support of Western powers "through the United Nations" was secured. Yet there is little criticism of the intellectuals who, in search of progress, ushered in the divisiveness and war that devastated the country, destroyed millions of lives, and created a lost generation who know only the power of the gun, "addicted to hashish, heroin, homosexuality, sadism, and other kinds of moral degradation." General; upper-division through faculty. F. L. Mokhtari; Norwich University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, October 1995
Choice, December 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Few people are more respected or better positioned to speak on the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan than M. Hassan Kakar. A professor at Kabul University and scholar of Afghanistan affairs at the time of the 1978 coup d'État, Kakar vividly describes the events surrounding the Soviet invasion in 1979 and the encounter between the military superpower and the poorly armed Afghans. The events that followed are carefully detailed, with eyewitness accounts and authoritative documentation that provide an unparalleled view of this historical moment. Because of his prominence Kakar was at first treated with deference by the Marxist government and was not imprisoned, although he openly criticized the regime. When he was put behind bars the outcry from scholars all over the world possibly saved his life. In prison for five years, he continued collecting information, much of it from prominent Afghans of varying political persuasions who were themselves prisoners. Kakar brings firsthand knowledge and a historian's sensibility to his account of the invasion and its aftermath. This is both a personal document and a historical one--Kakar lived through the events he describes, and his concern for human rights rather than party politics infuses his writing. As Afghans and the rest of the world try to make sense of Afghanistan's recent past, Kakar's voice will be one of those most listened to.
Table of Contents
Preface
Maps
Introductionp. 1
The Soviet Invasion of Afghanistanp. 21
Why Did the Soviet Union Invade?p. 32
Under the Soviet Shadowp. 51
Islamic Resistance Organizationsp. 79
Nationalist Resistance Organizationsp. 96
Urban Uprisings and Their Suppressionp. 110
Beginning of the Countrywide Armed Clashesp. 124
A New Type of War Leader: The Case of Logarp. 138
KhAD as an Agency of Suppressionp. 153
Military and Administrative Measures for Consolidation of the Governmentp. 169
Victory at Any Costp. 187
Elimination of Opponents by Nonmilitary Meansp. 199
Genocide Throughout the Countryp. 213
Genocide in Districts Around Kabulp. 231
Conclusionp. 253
Epilogue, 1982-1994p. 257
Appendix A. Political Organizations, Factions, and Unionsp. 301
Appendix B. Selected Biographical Sketchesp. 304
Appendix C. Afghan Refugees in Pakistanp. 319
Appendix D. Telephone Conversation Between Kosygin and Tarakip. 321
Notesp. 327
Glossaryp. 355
Select Bibliographyp. 357
Indexp. 365
About the Authorp. 379
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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