Catalogue


The advancement of science [electronic resource] : science without legend, objectivity without illusions /
Philip Kitcher.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, c1993.
description
viii, 421 p.
ISBN
0195096533 (pbk), 9780195096538
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, c1993.
isbn
0195096533 (pbk)
9780195096538
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"First issued as an Oxford University Press paperback 1995." -- t.p. verso.
catalogue key
7824125
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 392-406) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-11:
Kitcher advances the thesis that fields of science do make progress; and he argues that even in periods where rival theories seem equally justified, decisions are ultimately made on the basis of superior cognitive strategies. He does not deny the role of nonepistemic factors, e.g., psychology or social factors, in decision making in science, but rather gives detailed attention to these as well as cognitive factors in such historical cases as the adoption of Darwinism or Copernicanism and the Lavoisier-Priestley and Hobbes-Boyle debates. Kitcher explores two central motivators to scientific change, i.e., encounters with nature and scientists' conversations with peers. He works to forge a compromise position that captures aspects of both rationalism/antirationalism and realism/antirealism. In pursuing this argument he interprets "rationality" in terms of "good cognitive design relative to a set of goals" and sees science as seeking "true statements about significant issues." He addresses a number of key problems in philosophy of science, e.g., underdetermination of theory and the theory-ladenness of observation, but he also introduces exciting new issues to be explored, e.g., the concept of "individual practices," and the query about community strategies for advancing scientific knowledge. This book is a must for philosophers, historians, and sociologists of sciences as well as for reflective scientists. Graduate; faculty. J. A. Kegley; California State University, Bakersfield
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A must for philosophers, historians, and sociologists of sciences as well as for reflective scientists."--Choice
"A must for philosophers, historians, and sociologists of sciences as wellas for reflective scientists."--Choice
"An essential text for anyone concerned with the fundamental issues it addresses....The book is full of insightful and important ideas and analysis, and is written with the clarity and force of argument that readers of Kitcher's earlier works will expect. There can be no doubt that itconstitutes a significant contribution to fundamental issues in the philosophy of science."--The Philosophical Review
"An essential text for anyone concerned with the fundamental issues itaddresses....The book is full of insightful and important ideas and analysis,and is written with the clarity and force of argument that readers of Kitcher'searlier works will expect. There can be no doubt that it constitutes asignificant contribution to fundamental issues in the philosophy ofscience."--The Philsophical Reveiw
It is a serious, learned, thoroughly argued work.
"It is a serious, learned, thoroughly argued work..."--Nature
"Kitcher continues to show why he is a leading figure in philosophy of science."--David B. Boersema, Pacific University
"Kitcher continues to show why he is a leading figure in philosophy ofscience."--David B. Boersema, Pacific University
"[Kitcher] makes an important contribution that will enable philosophers once more to give credit to those parts of science where credit is due....A book that is destined to be discussed by all those interested in science for some years to come."--New York Times Book Review
"[Kitcher] makes an important contribution that will enable philosophersonce more to give credit to those parts of science where credit is due....A bookthat is destined to be discussed by all those interested in science for someyears to come."--New York Times Book Review
"Philip Kitcher, in his excellent new book, provides something that has not been available before: a careful, detailed and systematic attempt to show that what's wrong with traditional accounts of science can be conceded...without thereby sacrificing at any rate the core claims of scientificrationalists....Few philosophers will fail to agree that this book constitutes a significant step forward in the discipline"--Times Higher Education Supplement
"Philip Kitcher, in his excellent new book, provides something that hasnot been available before: a careful, detailed and systematic attempt to showthat what's wrong with traditional accounts of science can be conceded...withoutthereby sacrificing at any rate the core claims of scientificrationalists....Few philosophers will fail to agree that this book constitutes asignificant step forward in the discipline"--Times Higher EducationSupplement
"Philip Kitcher, in his excellent new book, provides something that has not been available before: a careful, detailed and systematic attempt to show that what's wrong with traditional accounts of science can be conceded...without thereby sacrificing at any rate the core claims of scientific rationalists....Few philosophers will fail to agree that this book constitutes a significant step forward in the discipline"-- Times Higher Education Supplement "[Kitcher] makes an important contribution that will enable philosophers once more to give credit to those parts of science where credit is due....A book that is destined to be discussed by all those interested in science for some years to come."-- New York Times Book Review "A must for philosophers, historians, and sociologists of sciences as well as for reflective scientists."-- Choice "This will be a book of major significance in philosophy of science. It develops an approach that incorporates historical, social, economic, and psychological aspects of science without giving up the kind of logical rigor that has always characterized Kitcher's work (as well as that of such philosophers as Hempel and Carnap). As I see it, this work should provide a substantial synthesis of the great traditions associated respectively with Kuhn and Hempel. Impressively innovative, it constitutes a large step forward in the discipline."--Wesley C. Salmon, University of Pittsburgh "An essential text for anyone concerned with the fundamental issues it addresses....The book is full of insightful and important ideas and analysis, and is written with the clarity and force of argument that readers of Kitcher's earlier works will expect. There can be no doubt that it constitutes a significant contribution to fundamental issues in the philosophy of science."-- The Philosophical Review
"Philip Kitcher, in his excellent new book, provides something that has not been available before: a careful, detailed and systematic attempt to show that what's wrong with traditional accounts of science can be conceded...without thereby sacrificing at any rate the core claims of scientific rationalists....Few philosophers will fail to agree that this book constitutes a significant step forward in the discipline"--Times Higher Education Supplement "[Kitcher] makes an important contribution that will enable philosophers once more to give credit to those parts of science where credit is due....A book that is destined to be discussed by all those interested in science for some years to come."--New York Times Book Review "A must for philosophers, historians, and sociologists of sciences as well as for reflective scientists."--Choice "This will be a book ofmajor significancein philosophy of science. It develops an approach that incorporates historical, social, economic, and psychological aspects of science without giving up the kind of logical rigor that has always characterized Kitcher's work (as well as that of such philosophers as Hempel and Carnap). As I see it, this work should provide a substantial synthesis of the great traditions associated respectively with Kuhn and Hempel. Impressively innovative, it constitutes a large step forward in the discipline."--Wesley C. Salmon,University of Pittsburgh "An essential text for anyone concerned with the fundamental issues it addresses....The book is full of insightful and important ideas and analysis, and is written with the clarity and force of argument that readers of Kitcher's earlier works will expect. There can be no doubt that it constitutes a significant contribution to fundamental issues in the philosophy of science."--The Philosophical Review
"This will be a book of major significance in philosophy of science. It develops an approach that incorporates historical, social, economic, and psychological aspects of science without giving up the kind of logical rigor that has always characterized Kitcher's work (as well as that of suchphilosophers as Hempel and Carnap). As I see it, this work should provide a substantial synthesis of the great traditions associated respectively with Kuhn and Hempel. Impressively innovative, it constitutes a large step forward in the discipline."--Wesley C. Salmon, University ofPittsburgh
"This will be a book of major significance in philosophy of science. Itdevelops an approach that incorporates historical, social, economic, andpsychological aspects of science without giving up the kind of logical rigorthat has always characterized Kitcher's work (as well as that of suchphilosophers as Hempel and Carnap). As I see it, this work should provide asubstantial synthesis of the great traditions associated respectively with Kuhnand Hempel. Impressively innovative, it constitutes a large step forward in thediscipline."--Wesley C. Salmon, University of Pittsburgh
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Summaries
Long Description
During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal and social interests, who cooperate and compete with one another, he argues that, nonetheless, we may conceive the growth of science as a process in which both our vision of nature and our ways of learning more about nature improve. Offering a detailed picture of the advancement of science, he sets a new agenda for the philosophy of science and for other "science studies" disciplines.
Long Description
Philip Kitcher resurrects notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of the growth of knowledge and overreactions to philosophical idealizations.
Main Description
During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science byidentifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal and social interests, whocooperate and compete with one another, he argues that, nonetheless, we may conceive the growth of science as a process in which both our vision of nature and our ways of learning more about nature improve. Offering a detailed picture of the advancement of science, he sets a new agenda for thephilosophy of science and for other "science studies" disciplines.
Unpaid Annotation
Setting a new agenda for the philosophy of science and for other "science studies" disciplines, in this book the well-known philosopher Philip Kitcher offers an innovative and detailed picture of the advancement of science. During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal and social interests who cooperate and compete with one another, he argues that, nonetheless, we may conceive the growth of science as a process in which both our vision of nature and our ways of learning more about nature improve. Undertaking a novel synthesis that preserves the very conceptions of objectivity and progress in epistemology and philosophy of science, this book accommodates and examines the insights of historians and sociologists of science who have criticized traditional philosophy of science. Pointing to a new way of discussing science, The Advancement of Science is of key interest to philosophers of science, historians of science, sociologists of science, and reflective scientists.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Legend's Legacyp. 3
Darwin's Achievementp. 11
The Microstructure of Scientific Changep. 58
Varieties of Progressp. 90
Realism and Scientific Progressp. 127
Dissolving Rationalityp. 178
The Experimental Philosophyp. 219
The Organization of Cognitive Laborp. 303
Envoip. 390
Bibliographyp. 392
Indexp. 407
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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