Catalogue


1910, the emancipation of dissonance [electronic resource] /
Thomas Harrison.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1996.
description
xii, 264 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520200438 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1996.
isbn
0520200438 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7816260
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-257) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
" 1910 stands out as a model of interdisciplinary and comparative study. . . . It brilliantly illustrates the complexity of a crucial period in European culture . . . focusing in particular on the intellectual intricacies of Mitteleuropa on the eve of World War I and of the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian empire."--Lucia Re "Compellingly original. . . . In Harrison's work, Michelstaedter and his confreres (Campana, Slataper, Kokoschke, Rilke, Kandinsky, Lukàcs, Trakl, et al.) turn out to be considerably more fascinating and more emblematic of their time than anyone has been able to perceive before."--Gregory Lucente, University of Michigan
Flap Copy
"1910stands out as a model of interdisciplinary and comparative study. . . . It brilliantly illustrates the complexity of a crucial period in European culture . . . focusing in particular on the intellectual intricacies of Mitteleuropa on the eve of World War I and of the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian empire."--Lucia Re "Compellingly original. . . . In Harrison's work, Michelstaedter and his confreres (Campana, Slataper, Kokoschke, Rilke, Kandinsky, Lukagrave;cs, Trakl, et al.) turn out to be considerably more fascinating and more emblematic of their time than anyone has been able to perceive before."--Gregory Lucente, University of Michigan
Flap Copy
"1910 stands out as a model of interdisciplinary and comparative study. . . . It brilliantly illustrates the complexity of a crucial period in European culture . . . focusing in particular on the intellectual intricacies of Mitteleuropa on the eve of World War I and of the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian empire."--Lucia Re "Compellingly original. . . . In Harrison's work, Michelstaedter and his confreres (Campana, Slataper, Kokoschke, Rilke, Kandinsky, Lukagrave;cs, Trakl, et al.) turn out to be considerably more fascinating and more emblematic of their time than anyone has been able to perceive before."--Gregory Lucente, University of Michigan
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-09-01:
Harrison argues that the cultural anguish of the pre-WW I era was most deeply suffered in the Central European Empires, and that the clearest reconstruction of that anguish can be obtained through examining figures and themes at the peripheries of European civilization. Focusing on a particular strand within Expressionism and employing the youthful suicide Carlo Michelstaedter and others of his cohort as examples, Harrison wields a poet's eye and pen in extracting from the agonies of individual lives and artistic creations the distorted contours of a world self-absorbed with despair, impotence, and death. The dissonance unleashed by this preoccupation with isolated, internal subjectivity led first to an impossible, impassioned embrace of extreme contradictions and ultimately, after the cataclysm of the war, back to a search for external forms and resolutions. While in many ways accessible only to the most advanced readers, 1910 supplements well the classic works in this field, Carl Schorscke's Fin-de-Siecle Vienna (CH, Jun'80) and Robert Wohl's The Generation of 1914 (CH, Jan'80). F. Burkhard Morgan State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The year 1910 marks an astonishing, and largely unrecognized, juncture in Western history. In this perceptive interdisciplinary analysis, Thomas Harrison addresses the extraordinary intellectual achievement of the time. Focusing on the cultural climate of Middle Europe and paying particular attention to the life and work of Carlo Michelstaedter, he deftly portrays the reciprocal implications of different discourses--philosophy, literature, sociology, music, and painting. His beautifully balanced and deeply informed study provides a new, wider, and more ambitious definition of expressionism and shows the significance of this movement in shaping the artistic and intellectual mood of the age."1910 probes the recurrent themes and obsessions in the work of intellectuals as diverse as Egon Schiele, Georg Trakl, Vasily Kandinsky, Georg Lukacs, Georg Simmel, Dino Campana, and Arnold Schoenberg. Together with Michelstaedter, who committed suicide in 1910 at the age of 23, these thinkers shared the essential concerns of expressionism: a sense of irresolvable conflict in human existence, the philosophical status of death, and a quest for the nature of human subjectivity. Expressionism, Harrison argues provocatively, was a last, desperate attempt by the intelligentsia to defend some of the most venerable assumptions of European culture. This ideological desperation, he claims, was more than a spiritual prelude to World War I: it was an unheeded, prophetic critique.
Main Description
The year 1910 marks an astonishing, and largely unrecognized, juncture in Western history. In this perceptive interdisciplinary analysis, Thomas Harrison addresses the extraordinary intellectual achievement of the time. Focusing on the cultural climate of Middle Europe and paying particular attention to the life and work of Carlo Michelstaedter, he deftly portrays the reciprocal implications of different discourses--philosophy, literature, sociology, music, and painting. His beautifully balanced and deeply informed study provides a new, wider, and more ambitious definition of expressionism and shows the significance of this movement in shaping the artistic and intellectual mood of the age. 1910 probes the recurrent themes and obsessions in the work of intellectuals as diverse as Egon Schiele, Georg Trakl, Vasily Kandinsky, Georg Lukàcs, Georg Simmel, Dino Campana, and Arnold Schoenberg. Together with Michelstaedter, who committed suicide in 1910 at the age of 23, these thinkers shared the essential concerns of expressionism: a sense of irresolvable conflict in human existence, the philosophical status of death, and a quest for the nature of human subjectivity. Expressionism, Harrison argues provocatively, was a last, desperate attempt by the intelligentsia to defend some of the most venerable assumptions of European culture. This ideological desperation, he claims, was more than a spiritual prelude to World War I: it was an unheeded, prophetic critique.
Long Description
The year 1910 marks an astonishing, and largely unrecognized, juncture in Western history. In this perceptive interdisciplinary analysis, Thomas Harrison addresses the extraordinary intellectual achievement of the time. Focusing on the cultural climate of Middle Europe and paying particular attention to the life and work of Carlo Michelstaedter, he deftly portrays the reciprocal implications of different discourses--philosophy, literature, sociology, music, and painting. His beautifully balanced and deeply informed study provides a new, wider, and more ambitious definition of expressionism and shows the significance of this movement in shaping the artistic and intellectual mood of the age. 1910probes the recurrent themes and obsessions in the work of intellectuals as diverse as Egon Schiele, Georg Trakl, Vasily Kandinsky, Georg Lukagrave;cs, Georg Simmel, Dino Campana, and Arnold Schoenberg. Together with Michelstaedter, who committed suicide in 1910 at the age of 23, these thinkers shared the essential concerns of expressionism: a sense of irresolvable conflict in human existence, the philosophical status of death, and a quest for the nature of human subjectivity. Expressionism, Harrison argues provocatively, was a last, desperate attempt by the intelligentsia to defend some of the most venerable assumptions of European culture. This ideological desperation, he claims, was more than a spiritual prelude to World War I: it was an unheeded, prophetic critique.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
The Emancipation of Dissonancep. 18
Gorizia, Judaic Indeterminacy and Triestine Artp. 20
The Chimerap. 32
Poetic Duplicityp. 40
Decentralized Musicp. 46
Spirituality and Materialismp. 52
Destiny at Odds with Itselfp. 60
An Ontology of Oppositionp. 66
Persuasive Life-Experiencep. 77
The Deficiency of Beingp. 85
Three Womenp. 85
A Deadly Vocationp. 91
In the Beginning Was the Endp. 97
Life as Abstractionp. 101
Sociology of Deathp. 105
Decrepitude in Body and Soulp. 108
Cosmic Guiltp. 117
Impotencep. 121
Loss of Selfp. 136
The Hole Called the Soulp. 139
Autoscopyp. 141
Qualitative Individualismp. 146
Subjective Transcendencep. 149
Self-Possessionp. 154
Pictures of Soulp. 164
An Ethics of Misunderstandingp. 182
Ethical and Aesthetic Transcendencep. 184
Spiritual Povertyp. 189
Tragic Acquiescencep. 195
Ecstatic Confessionsp. 202
Intransitive Lovep. 205
Ladies of the Unicorn: Structive Artp. 210
Afterword and Aftermathp. 216
Primary Sourcesp. 227
Secondary Sourcesp. 241
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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