Catalogue


Deviant and useful citizens : the cultural production of the female body in eighteenth-century Peru /
Mariselle Melendez.
imprint
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, c2011.
description
xi, 235 p.
ISBN
0826517684 (cloth edition : alk. paper), 9780826517685 (cloth edition : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, c2011.
isbn
0826517684 (cloth edition : alk. paper)
9780826517685 (cloth edition : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7814259
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 209-221) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Constructing and controlling women in Colonial South America
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The writing is clear despite the complexity of the subject and should appeal to Andeanists, colonialists, and women and gender scholars." -- Hispanic American Historical Review
"Melendez offers important information about and insight into issues about women and gender in eighteenth-century Peru" --Magali Carrera, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, author of Imagining Identity in New Spain
"Melendez offers important information about and insight into issues about women and gender in eighteenth-century Peru" --Magali Carrera, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, author ofImagining Identity in New Spain
Melendez's book is definitely interesting, creatively researched, and clearly written. -- The Americas
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, October 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Deviant and Useful Citizensexplores the conditions of women and perceptions of the female body in the eighteenth century throughout the Viceroyalty of Peru, which until 1776 comprised modern-day Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. Mariselle Melendez introduces the reader to a female rebel, Micaela Bastidas, whose brutal punishment became a particularly harsh example of state response to women who challenged the system. She explores the cultural representation of women depicted as economically productive and vital to the health of the culture at large. The role of women in religious orders provides still another window into the vital need to sustain the image of women as loyal and devout -- and to deal with women who refused to comply. The book focuses on the different ways male authorities, as well as female subjects, conceived the female body as deeply connected to notions of what constituted a useful or deviant citizen within the Viceroyalty. Using eighteenth-century legal documents, illustrated chronicles, religious texts, and newspapers, Mariselle Melendez explores in depth the representation of the female body in periods of political, economic, and religious crisis to determine how it was conceived within certain contexts. Deviant and Useful Citizenspresents a highly complex society that relied on representations of utility and productivity to understand the female body, as it reveals the surprisingly large stake that colonial authorities had in defining the status of women during a crucial time in South American history.
Main Description
Deviant and Useful Citizens explores the conditions of women and perceptions of the female body in the eighteenth century throughout the Viceroyalty of Peru, which until 1776 comprised modern-day Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. Mariselle Melendez introduces the reader to a female rebel, Micaela Bastidas, whose brutal punishment became a particularly harsh example of state response to women who challenged the system. She explores the cultural representation of women depicted as economically productive and vital to the health of the culture at large. The role of women in religious orders provides still another window into the vital need to sustain the image of women as loyal and devout -- and to deal with women who refused to comply. The book focuses on the different ways male authorities, as well as female subjects, conceived the female body as deeply connected to notions of what constituted a useful or deviant citizen within the Viceroyalty. Using eighteenth-century legal documents, illustrated chronicles, religious texts, and newspapers, Mariselle Melendez explores in depth the representation of the female body in periods of political, economic, and religious crisis to determine how it was conceived within certain contexts. Deviant and Useful Citizens presents a highly complex society that relied on representations of utility and productivity to understand the female body, as it reveals the surprisingly large stake that colonial authorities had in defining the status of women during a crucial time in South American history.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Micaela Bastidas's Legible Body: Public Spectacle, Violence, and Fear in Tupac Amaru's Insurrectionp. 11
Visualizing and Commodifying Female Bodies in Truxillo del Peru From Colonial Order to Economic Productivityp. 41
Patriotic Bodies and Corporeal Rhetorics: Sor Maria Josefa de la Santisima Trinidad's Historia de la Fundacion del Monasterio de Trinitarias Descalzas de Lima (1783)p. 83
The Nation and Its Congenital Deformations: The Medicalized Female Body in the Mercurio Peruano, 1791-1795p. 127
Epilogue: Prescribing Bodiesp. 171
Notesp. 175
Works Citedp. 209
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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