Catalogue


Democratic enlightenment : philosophy, revolution, and human rights 1750-1790 /
Jonathan I. Israel.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.
description
xvi, 1066 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
019954820X, 9780199548200
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.
isbn
019954820X
9780199548200
contents note
Pt. 1: The radical challenge. Nature and providence: earthquakes and the human condition -- The Encyclopédie suppressed (1752-1760) -- Rousseau against the Philosophes -- Voltaire, enlightenment, and the European courts -- Anti-philosophes -- Central Europe: Aufklärung divided -- Pt. 2: Rationalizing the Ancien Régime. Hume, scepticism, and moderation -- Scottish enlightenment and man's 'progress' -- Enlightened despotism -- Aufklärung and the fracturing of German protestant culture -- Catholic enlightenment: the papacy's retreat -- Society and the rise of the Italian revolutionary enlightenment -- Spain and the challenge of reform -- Pt. 3: Europe and the remaking of the world. The Histoire philosophique, or colonialism overturned -- The American revolution -- Europe and the Amerindians -- Philosophy and revolt in Ibero-America (1765-1792) -- Commercial despotism: Dutch colonialism in Asia -- China, Japan, and the West -- India and the two enlightenments -- Russia's Greeks, Poles, and Serfs -- Pt. 4: Spinoza controversies in the later enlightenment. Rousseau, Spinoza, and the 'general will' -- Radical breakthrough -- Pantheismusstreit (1780-1787) -- Kant and the radical challenge -- Goethe, Schiller, and the new 'Dutch Revolt' against Spain -- Pt. 5: Revolution. 1788-1789: the 'general revolution' begins -- The diffusion -- 'Philosophy' as a maker of revolutions -- Aufklärung and the secret societies (1776-1792) -- Small-state revolutions in the 1780s -- The Dutch democratic revolution of the 1780s -- The French revolution: from 'philosophy' to basic human rights (1788-1790) -- Epilogue: 1789 as an intellectual revolution.
catalogue key
7813663
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-10-01:
With this third volume, Israel (history, Inst. for Advanced Study; Radical Enlightenment; Enlightenment Contested) completes his groundbreaking work on the Enlightenment. Though his prose is at times almost opaque and the book is so thick that it will probably be read in parts rather than as a whole, it's a magisterial study of the immediate and middle-range intellectual underpinnings of the French and subsequent democratic revolutions. A renowned controversialist, Israel takes on conventional views of the origins of the French Revolution, arguing that only the radical Enlightenment of Diderot, d'Holbach, and Helvetius provided a language capable of fueling such change in a society mired in tradition. Despite its defects in style, this trilogy is by far the most comprehensive and best study of the late 18th-century attitudinal changes that shaped modern thought and action. No serious work equals it in span (it covers Europe, Asia, and the Americas) or depth (Germany's Enlightenment, the Aufklarung, merits as much space as the philosophes or Hume). VERDICT It's unfortunate that so good a scholar is not a better writer; nonetheless, this is an essential book for all who are studying the Enlightenment.-David Keymer, Modesto, CA (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2012-07-01:
The third volume of Israel's monumental intellectual history of the Enlightenment, like the first two (A Revolution of the Mind, CH, May'10, 47-5313, and Enlightenment Contested, CH, Oct'07, 45-0793), is of a very high quality. It merits careful reading by anyone seriously interested in understanding the Enlightenment. The general argument of the three volumes is summarized at the outset of this one. There are two rival factions within the revolutionary body of philosophical ideas of the Enlightenment: one moderate, the other radical. Eventually the moderate Enlightenment reveals its inability to deliver on the revolutionary political and social promises implicit in the movement. The moderate Enlightenment thus gives way to the more powerful radical Enlightenment. Where philosophers like Locke and Hume were restrained in the expression of their views on the absence of any teleological or divinely ordered world, their more radical counterparts were not. Israel (modern history, Princeton Univ.) sets the development of their ideas in the context of the great controversies that extended through the historical period spanning the Glorious to the French Revolutions. He reveals how this second wave overwhelms the first, and how their ideas of democracy, universal human rights, sexual freedom, and equality come to define the contemporary age. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. P. N. Malcolmson St. Thomas University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A magisterial study of the immediate and middle-range intellectual underpinnings of the French and subsequent democratic revolutions...this trilogy is by far the most comprehensive and best study of the late 18th-century attitudinal changes that shaped modern thought and action...No serious work equals it in span...or depth...this is an essential book for all who are studying the Enlightenment." --Library Journal
"A magisterial study of the immediate and middle-range intellectual underpinnings of the French and subsequent democratic revolutions...this trilogy is by far the most comprehensive and best study of the late 18th-century attitudinal changes that shaped modern thought and action...No serious work equals it in span...or depth...this is an essential book for all who are studying the Enlightenment." --Library Journal "Israel has turned up evidence of the Radical Enlightenment's influence in surprising places, and that labor alone should ensure that this book finds a place on every specialist's shelf." --New York Times Book Review
''An enormously impressive piece of scholarship. The breadth and depth of the author's reading are breathtaking and Enlightenment Contested is set to become the definitive work for philosophers as well as historians on this extraordinary period.' '- Keith Richmond, Tribune
"An enormously impressive piece of scholarship. The breadth and depth of the author's reading are breathtaking and Enlightenment Contested is set to become the definitive work for philosophers as well as historians on this extraordinary period." --Keith Richmond, Tribune
''Enlightenment Contested is full of wonderful things''- John Dunn, Literary Review
"Enlightenment Contested is full of wonderful things" --John Dunn, Literary Review
''Evocative and compelling.''- John Dunn, Literary Review
"Evocative and compelling." --John Dunn, Literary Review
''Mr Israel's groundbreaking interpretation looks set to establish itself as the one to beat.''- The Economist
"Mr Israel's groundbreaking interpretation looks set to establish itself as the one to beat." --The Economist
'Review from previous edition 'Brilliantly presented and dense with learning.' '- Simon Blackburn, THES
Review from previous edition: "Brilliantly presented and dense with learning." --Simon Blackburn, THES
'Review from previous edition Review from previous edition 'Brilliantly presented and dense with learning.' '- Simon Blackburn, THES''An enormously impressive piece of scholarship. The breadth and depth of the author's reading are breathtaking and Enlightenment Contested is set to become the definitive work for philosophers as well as historians on this extraordinary period.' '- Keith Richmond, Tribune''Mr Israel's groundbreaking interpretation looks set to establish itself as the one to beat.' '- The Economist''Evocative and compelling.' ' - John Dunn, Literary Review''Enlightenment Contested is full of wonderful things' '- John Dunn, Literary Review
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, October 2011
New York Times Book Review, December 2011
Choice, July 2012
New York Times Full Text Review, December 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Jonathan Israel's radical account of the late Enlightenment highlights forgotten currents and figures. Running counter to mainstream thinking, he demonstrates how a group of philosophe-revolutionnaires provided the intellectual powerhouse of the French Revolution, and how their ideas connect with modern Western democracy.
Long Description
The Enlightenment shaped modernity. Western values of representative democracy and basic human rights, gender and racial equality, individual liberty, and freedom of expression and the press, form an interlocking system that derives directly from the Enlightenment's philosophical revolution. This fact is uncontested - yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to thepresent day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. He demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. From 1789, its impetus came from a small group of philosophe-revolutionnaires, men such as Mirabeau, Sieyes, Condorcet, Volney, Roederer, and Brissot. Not aligned to any of the social groups who took the lead in the French National assembly, the Paris commune, or the editing of the Parisian revolutionary journals, they nonetheless forged 'la philosophie moderne' --in effect Radical Enlightenment ideas -- into a world-transforming ideology that had a lasting impact in Latin America and eastern Europe as well as France, Italy, Germany, and the Low Countries. Whilst all French revolutionary journals clearly stated that la philosophie moderne was the main cause of the French Revolution, the main stream of historical thought has failed to grasp what this implies. Israel sets the record straight, demonstrating the true nature of the engine that drove the Revolution, and the intimate links between the radical wing of the Enlightenment and the anti-Robespierriste 'Revolution of reason'.
Main Description
That the Enlightenment shaped modernity is uncontested. Yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to the present day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. InDemocratic Enlightenment, Israel demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. The American Revolution and its concerns certainly acted as a major factor in the intellectual ferment that shaped the wider upheaval that followed, but the radicalphilosopheswere no less critical than enthusiastic about the American model. From 1789, the General Revolution's impetus came from a small group ofphilosophe-revolutionnaires, men such as Mirabeau, Sieyes, Condorcet, Volney, Roederer, and Brissot. Not aligned to any of the social groups represented in the French National assembly, they nonetheless forged "la philosophie moderne"--in effect Radical Enlightenment ideas--into a world-transforming ideology that had a lasting impact in Latin America, Canada and eastern Europe as well as France, Italy, Germany, and the Low Countries. In addition, Israel argues that while all French revolutionary journals powerfully affirmed thatla philosophie modernewas the main cause of the French Revolution, the main stream of historical thought has failed to grasp what this implies. Israel sets the record straight, demonstrating the true nature of the engine that drove the Revolution, and the intimate links between the radical wing of the Enlightenment and the anti-Robespierriste "Revolution of reason." Acclaim for earlier volumes in the trilogy: "His vast--and vastly impressive--book sets out to redefine the intellectual landscape of early modern Europe. Magnificent and magisterialwill undoubtedly be one of the truly great historical works of the decade." --John Adamson,Sunday Telegraph "The scholarship is breathtaking. Israel has read everything, absorbed every nuance, followed up every byway." --Peter Watson,New Statesman "An enormously impressive piece of scholarship. The breadth and depth of the author's reading are breathtaking andEnlightenment Contestedis set to become the definitive work for philosophers as well as historians on this extraordinary period." -- Keith Richmond,Tribune
Main Description
That the Enlightenment shaped modernity is uncontested. Yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to the present day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. InDemocratic Enlightenment, Israel demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. The American Revolution and its concerns certainly acted as a major factor in the intellectual ferment that shaped the wider upheaval that followed, but the radicalphilosopheswere no less critical than enthusiastic about the American model. From 1789, the General Revolution's impetus came from a small group ofphilosophe-revolutionnaires, men such as Mirabeau, Sieyes, Condorcet, Volney, Roederer, and Brissot. Not aligned to any of the social groups represented in the French National assembly, they nonetheless forged "la philosophie moderne"--in effect Radical Enlightenment ideas--into a world-transforming ideology that had a lasting impact in Latin America, Canada and eastern Europe as well as France, Italy, Germany, and the Low Countries. In addition, Israel argues that while all French revolutionary journals powerfully affirmed thatla philosophie modernewas the main cause of the French Revolution, the main stream of historical thought has failed to grasp what this implies. Israel sets the record straight, demonstrating the true nature of the engine that drove the Revolution, and the intimate links between the radical wing of the Enlightenment and the anti-Robespierriste "Revolution of reason." Acclaim for earlier volumes in the trilogy: "His vast--and vastly impressive--book sets out to redefine the intellectual landscape of early modern Europe. Magnificent and magisterialwill undoubtedly be one of the truly great historical works of the decade." --Sunday Telegraph "The scholarship is breathtaking. Israel has read everything, absorbed every nuance, followed up every byway." --New Statesman "An enormously impressive piece of scholarship. The breadth and depth of the author's reading are breathtaking andEnlightenment Contestedis set to become the definitive work for philosophers as well as historians on this extraordinary period." --Tribune
Main Description
The Enlightenment shaped modernity. Western values of representative democracy and basic human rights, gender and racial equality, individual liberty, and freedom of expression and the press, form an interlocking system that derives directly from the Enlightenment's philosophical revolution. This fact is uncontested - yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to the present day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. He demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. From 1789, its impetus came from a small group of philosophe-revolutionnaires, men such as Mirabeau, Sieyes, Condorcet, Volney, Roederer, and Brissot. Not aligned to any of the social groups who took the lead in the French National assembly, the Paris commune, or the editing of the Parisian revolutionary journals, they nonetheless forged 'la philosophie moderne' - in effect Radical Enlightenment ideas - into a world-transforming ideology that had a lasting impact in Latin America and eastern Europe as well as France, Italy, Germany, and the Low Countries. Whilst all French revolutionary journals clearly stated that la philosophie moderne was the main cause of the French Revolution, the main stream of historical thought has failed to grasp what this implies. Israel sets the record straight, demonstrating the true nature of the engine that drove the Revolution, and the intimate links between the radical wing of the Enlightenment and the anti-Robespierriste "Revolution of reason".
Main Description
The Enlightenment shaped modernity. Western values of representative democracy and basic human rights, gender and racial equality, individual liberty, and freedom of expression and the press, form an interlocking system that derives directly from the Enlightenment's philosophical revolution.This fact is uncontested - yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to the present day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. He demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. From 1789, its impetus came from a small group of philosophe-revolutionnaires, men such as Mirabeau, Sieyes, Condorcet, Volney, Roederer, and Brissot. Not aligned to any of the socialgroups who took the lead in the French National assembly, the Paris commune, or the editing of the Parisian revolutionary journals, they nonetheless forged 'la philosophie moderne' - in effect Radical Enlightenment ideas - into a world-transforming ideology that had a lasting impact in Latin Americaand eastern Europe as well as France, Italy, Germany, and the Low Countries. Whilst all French revolutionary journals clearly stated that la philosophie moderne was the main cause of the French Revolution, the main stream of historical thought has failed to grasp what this implies. Israel sets the record straight, demonstrating the true nature of the engine that drove theRevolution, and the intimate links between the radical wing of the Enlightenment and the anti-Robespierriste "Revolution of reason".

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