Catalogue


The salvation of the flesh in Tertullian of Carthage : dressing for the resurrection /
Carly Daniel-Hughes.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xv, 176 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230117732 (hardback), 9780230117730 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230117732 (hardback)
9780230117730 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Bodily Displays of Modesty: Or, How to Power Dress in the Roman World * The Clothing that Maketh the Christian Man: Tertullian's On the Pallium * Why is She the "Devi's Gateway"?: Debating Adornment in Christian Carthage * Shaming the Virgins' Flesh: Tertullian's On the Veiling of Virgins.
abstract
"Ideal for scholars and students of early Christianity, Dressing for the Resurrection examines Tertullian of Carthage's (160-220 C.E.) writings on dress within Roman vestimentary culture. It employs a socio-historical approach, together with insights from performance theory and feminist rhetorical analysis, to situate Tertullian's comments in the broader context of the Roman Empire, and to investigate them as evidence of the productive and disputed role clothing and adornment played in early Christian life and constructions of salvation"--
"Why did the influential Christian thinker, Tertullian of Carthage (160-220 C.E.), while addressing the critical issue of salvation of the flesh, write about clothing? Why did he care what Christians wore? Carly Daniel-Hughes answers that in early Christian communities clothing tied to identity and theology. Placing Tertullian's writings in the Roman culture of dress, she shows that in them men's dress is used to envision Christian masculinity as non-Roman and anti-imperial. His concerns about women's dress, however, reveal internal Christian debates about the nature of the flesh and the possibility of its transformation in to a resurrected, glorious body"--
catalogue key
7808405
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [157]-167) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Carly Daniel-Hughes is an assistant professor of Religion at Concordia University (Montreal). She currently serves as a committee member of the Greco-Roman Meals Group of the Society of Biblical Literature.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Carly Daniel-Hughes has decisively shown that Tertullian's fascination with flesh, clothing and adornment expressed his deepest theological commitments. Far from frivolous or marginal, instructions regarding bodily comportment and dress were central to the performance of gendered identity, and not only for Tertullian. His frantic warnings about the dangers of unveiled virgins, his defense of the pallium , and his condemnations of cosmetics must therefore be taken seriously, as should this outstanding contribution to the study of ancient Christianity. Keenly observant, theoretically sophisticated and original, The Salvation of the Flesh is a must read for anyone interested in ancient Mediterranean religions, Roman history and gender studies." --Jennifer Knust, Associate Professor of Religion, Boston University "For ancient Christians, the question of how to "dress for success" was a matter of gravest concern. Life in this world was a preparation for the next, a honing of this mortal flesh into glorious resurrected bodies. Carly Daniel Hughes' brilliant and engagingly written new study shows how for believers, that transformation depended upon how one dressed in the here and now. Focusing on a controversial theologian, Tertullian of Carthage, she brings vividly to life Christian debates set within the visual and moral worlds of ancient dress codes, showing how matters of dressboth then and nowcan spark controversy even as they shape religious and gender identities." --Karen L. King, Hollis Professor of Divinity, Harvard University
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work examines Tertullian of Carthage's (160-220 CE) writings on dress within Roman vestimentary culture. It employs a socio-historical approach, together with insights from performance theory and feminist rhetorical analysis, to situate Tertullian's comments in the broader context of the Roman Empire.
Description for Bookstore
Ideal for scholars and students of early Christianity, Dressing for the Resurrection examines Tertullian of Carthage's (160-220 C.E.) writings on dress within Roman vestimentary culture
Long Description
Ideal for scholars and students of early Christianity, Dressing for the Resurrection examines Tertullian of Carthage's (160-220 C.E.) writings on dress within Roman vestimentary culture. It employs a socio-historical approach, together with insights from performance theory and feminist rhetorical analysis, to situate Tertullian's comments in the broader context of the Roman Empire, and to investigate them as evidence of the productive and disputed role clothing and adornment played in early Christian life and constructions of salvation.
Library of Congress Summary
"Ideal for scholars and students of early Christianity, Dressing for the Resurrection examines Tertullian of Carthage's (160-220 C.E.) writings on dress within Roman vestimentary culture. It employs a socio-historical approach, together with insights from performance theory and feminist rhetorical analysis, to situate Tertullian's comments in the broader context of the Roman Empire, and to investigate them as evidence of the productive and disputed role clothing and adornment played in early Christian life and constructions of salvation"--"Why did the influential Christian thinker, Tertullian of Carthage (160-220 C.E.), while addressing the critical issue of salvation of the flesh, write about clothing? Why did he care what Christians wore? Carly Daniel-Hughes answers that in early Christian communities clothing tied to identity and theology. Placing Tertullian's writings in the Roman culture of dress, she shows that in them men's dress is used to envision Christian masculinity as non-Roman and anti-imperial. His concerns about women's dress, however, reveal internal Christian debates about the nature of the flesh and the possibility of its transformation in to a resurrected, glorious body"--
Main Description
Ideal for scholars and students of early Christianity,Dressing for the Resurrectionexamines Tertullian of Carthage’s (160-220 C.E.) writings on dress within Roman vestimentary culture. It employs a socio-historical approach, together with insights from performance theory and feminist rhetorical analysis, to situate Tertullian’s comments in the broader context of the Roman Empire, and to investigate them as evidence of the productive and disputed role clothing and adornment played in early Christian life and constructions of salvation.
Main Description
Why did the influential Christian thinker, Tertullian of Carthage (160-220 C.e.), while addressing the critical issue of salvation of the flesh, write about clothing? Why did he care what Christians wore? Carly Daniel-Hughes answers that in early Christian communities clothing tied to identity and theology. Placing Tertullian's writings in the Roman culture of dress, she shows that in them men's dress is used to envision Christian masculinity as non-Roman and anti-imperial. His concerns about women's dress, however, reveal internal Christian debates about the nature of the flesh and the possibility of its transformation in to a resurrected, glorious body.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
List of Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: Dress in Tertullian of Carthagep. 1
Bodily Displays of Modesty: Or, How to Power Dress in the Roman Worldp. 15
The Clothing that Maketh the Christian Man: Tertullian's On the Palliump. 45
Why Is She the "Devil's Gateway"? Debating Adornment in Christian Carthagep. 63
Shaming the Virgins' Flesh: A Contest over Veilingp. 93
Epiloguep. 115
Notesp. 121
Bibliographyp. 157
Indexp. 169
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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