Catalogue

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Early modern England and Islamic worlds /
edited by Bernadette Andrea and Linda McJannet.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xiii, 272 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
023011542X (hardback), 9780230115422 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
023011542X (hardback)
9780230115422 (hardback)
abstract
"The essays in this book analyze range of genres--such as travel narratives, canonical and non-canonical drama, and prose romances--and consider geographical areas beyond the Ottoman Empire, including Mughal India, Safavid Persia, and the Muslim regions of Southeast and Central Asia. This collection deepens our post-Saidian understanding of the complexity of real and imagined "traffic" between England and the "Islamic worlds" it encountered and constructed"--
catalogue key
7808008
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-260) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Bernadette Andrea is Professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is the author of Women and Islam in Early Modern English Literature and English Women Staging Islam, 1696-1707. Linda McJannet is Professor of English and Media Studies at Bentley University. She is the author of The Voice of Elizabethan Stage Directions: The Evolution of a Theatrical Code and The Sultan Speaks: Dialogue in English Plays and Histories about the Ottoman Turks.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a very strong collection that will add significantly to current scholarship on Anglo-Islamic relations in the Early Modern period. It goes beyond the obsession with the Ottoman Turks in early modern writing, to demonstrate the importance of Arabs, Persians, Tartars, Mughals, and other Muslims. The methodology is strongly historicist (in the best sense of that word), providing rich and fascinating contextualizations of early modern written texts."--Daniel Vitkus, Professor of English, Florida State University " Early Modern England and Islamic Worlds offers brilliant and nuanced insights into English literary negotiations with Islamic cultures, political Islam, and Islam as a religion in the early modern period. Overall, it provides an important corrective to the anti-Islamic notions of a 'clash of civilizations."--Jyotsna G. Singh, Professor of English, Michigan State University "Documenting the English views of Muslims in multiple and contradictory ways, sometimes sympathetically, this welcome volume contests reactionary oppositions of 'East' and 'West' and offers nuanced analyses of various Islamic worlds, of their traffic with European economies and cultures, and of their variegated literary and theatrical representations in early modern England. [This volume] contributes valuably to a stimulating cluster of essays that interrogate Ottoman, Persian, and Mughal cultures and open fresh perspectives on an illuminating range of canonical and lesser known English works."--Richmond Barbour, Professor of English, Oregon State University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The essays in this book analyse a range of genres - such as travel narratives, canonical and non-canonical drama, and prose romances - and consider geographical areas beyond the Ottoman Empire, including Mughal India, Safavid Persia, and the Muslim regions of Southeast and Central Asia.
Description for Bookstore
The essays in this book analyze range of genres to deepen our post-Saidian understanding of real and imagined "traffic" between England and the "Islamic worlds" it encountered and constructed
Library of Congress Summary
"The essays in this book analyze range of genres--such as travel narratives, canonical and non-canonical drama, and prose romances--and consider geographical areas beyond the Ottoman Empire, including Mughal India, Safavid Persia, and the Muslim regions of Southeast and Central Asia. This collection deepens our post-Saidian understanding of the complexity of real and imagined "traffic" between England and the "Islamic worlds" it encountered and constructed"--
Main Description
Engaging with current debates about the "clash of civilizations," this book offers a novel challenge to the notion of a monolithic Islam in opposition to a monolithic West. The essays in this book analyze a range of genrestravel narrative, canonical and non-canonical drama, and prose romanceto consider geographical areas beyond the Ottoman Empire, including Mughal India, Safavid Persia, and the Muslim regions of Southeast and Central Asia. This collection deepens our post-Saidian understanding of the complexity of real and imagined "traffic" between England and the "Islamic worlds" it encountered and constructed.
Main Description
The essays in this book analyze a range of genressuch as travel narrative, canonical and non-canonical drama, and prose romanceand consider geographical areas beyond the Ottoman Empire, including Mughal India, Safavid Persia, and the Muslim regions of Southeast and Central Asia. This collection deepens our post-Saidian understanding of the complexity of real and imagined "traffic" between England and the "Islamic worlds" it encountered and constructed.
Table of Contents
Series Editors' Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
List of Contributorsp. xi
List of Illustrationsp. xv
Introduction: Islamic Worlds in Early Modern English Literaturep. 1
From Maurice to Muhammad: Othello, Islam, and Baptismp. 21
Islam, Race, and Political Legitimacy in Ralegh's The Life and Death of Mahometp. 35
Persian Icons, Shi'a Imams: Liminal Figures and Hybrid Persian Identities on the English Stagep. 53
The Tartar King's Masque and Performances of Imperial Desire in Mary Wroth's The Countess of Montgomery's Uraniap. 73
Mariam Khan and the Legacy of Mughal Women in Early Modern Literature of Indiap. 97
"by my owne experience or the Most probablest Relation off others": Manuscript Travel Writing and Peter Mundy's "Relation" of Constantinople (1617-20)p. 123
Guy of Warwick, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Elizabethan Repertoryp. 139
"Now will I be a Turke": Performing Ottoman Identity in Thomas Goffe's The Courageous Turkp. 159
The Frontiers of Twelfth Nightp. 173
"A Turk's mustachio": Anglo-Islamic Traffic and Exotic London in Ben Jonson's Every Man out of His Humour and Entertainment at Britain's Bursep. 197
"Oranges and lemons say the bells of St. Clement's": Domesticating Eastern Commodities in London Comediesp. 215
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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