Catalogue


The CSS Arkansas : a Confederate ironclad on western waters /
Myron J. Smith, Jr.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2011.
description
viii, 351 p.
ISBN
0786447265 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786447268 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2011.
isbn
0786447265 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786447268 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Beginnings -- The upper river ironclads -- A frustrating start, August-December 1861 -- From Memphis to Yazoo City, January-May 1862 -- Five weeks up the Yazoo, early May-late June 1862 -- Descending the Yazoo, June 25-July 15, 1862 -- Morning (part I), July 15, 1862: dawn fight in the Yazoo -- Morning (part II), July 15, 1862: running the gauntlet -- Surviving Farragut's charge: night, July 15, 1862 -- Arkansas vs. Essex, round one: July 16-22, 1862 -- Arkansas vs. Essex, round two: finale off Baton Rouge, July 23-August 6, 1862.
abstract
"The makeshift CSS Arkansas, completed by Lt. Isaac Newton Brown and manned by a mixed crew of volunteers, gave the South a surge of confidence when it launched in 1862. The saga of the CSS Arkansas represents the last significant Confederate naval activity in the war's Western theater"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7799670
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 329-342) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Civil War scholar Myron J. Smith, Jr., is the library director and a professor at Tusculum College in Greeneville, Tennessee.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
In his previous books, Smith (librarian, Tusculum College) established himself as one of the leading historians of the Civil War navies (e.g., The Timberclads in the Civil War, CH, Mar'09, 46-4057; Ironclads in the Civil War, CH, May'10, 47-5235), and the CSS Arkansas contributes to his standing. One of the most powerful warships to sail the Mississippi River and its tributaries, Arkansas proved a formidable opponent to Union forces seeking to control transportation routes through the western theater. Smith does an admirable job of placing ironclads into the framework of Civil War naval history, and he shows how both sides viewed the potential of armored warships. Considered to be an equalizer against large numbers of Union ships, Arkansas carried the hopes of the Confederates into several riverine engagements. Although initially successful, Arkansas suffered from both inadequate engines and uncontrolled events. While able to influence the riverine war, Arkansas and its crew could not control events on land, and the ship ultimately failed as Union forces on both water and land enveloped the territory Arkansas hoped to defend. Smith provides an excellent account of a noteworthy ship, providing plenty of supporting evidence, images, and maps. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. S. J. Ramold Eastern Michigan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, October 2011
Choice, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
While the Monitor and Merrimack are the most famous of the Civil War ironclads, the Confederacy had another ship in its flotilla that carried high hopes and a metal hull. The makeshift CSS Arkansas, completed by Lt. Isaac Newton Brown and manned by a mixed crew of volunteers, gave the South a surge of confidence when it launched in 1862. For 28 days of summer, the ship engaged in five battles with Union warships, falling victim in the end only to her own primitive engines. The saga of the CSS Arkansas represents the last significant Rebel naval activity in the war's Western theater.
Library of Congress Summary
"The makeshift CSS Arkansas, completed by Lt. Isaac Newton Brown and manned by a mixed crew of volunteers, gave the South a surge of confidence when it launched in 1862. The saga of the CSS Arkansas represents the last significant Confederate naval activity in the war's Western theater"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
While the Merrimack and Monitor are the most famous of the Civil War ironclads, The Confederacy had another ship in its flotilla that carried high hopes and a metal hull. The makeshift CSS Arkansas, completed by Lt. Isaac Newton Brown and manned by a mixed crew of volunteers, gave the South a surge of confidence when it launched in 1862. For 28 days of summer, The ship engaged in five battles with Union warships, falling victim in the end only to her own primitive engines. The CSS Arkansas was the last significant Confederate naval activity in the war's Western theater.
Main Description
While the Merrimack and Monitor are the most famous of the Civil War ironclads, The Confederacy had another ship in its flotilla that carried high hopes and a metal hull. The makeshift CSS Arkansas, completed by Lt. Isaac Newton Brown and manned by a mixed crew of volunteers, gave the South a surge of confidence when it launched in 1862. For 28 days of summer, The ship engaged in five battles with Union warships, falling victim in the end only to her own primitive engines. The saga of the CSS Arkansas represents the last significant Confederate naval activity in the war's Western theater.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Forewordp. 1
Introductionp. 5
Beginningsp. 9
The Upper River Ironcladsp. 24
A Frustrating Start, August-December 1861p. 38
From Memphis to Yazoo City, January-May 1862p. 57
Five Weeks Up the Yazoo, Early May-Late June 1862p. 80
Descending the Yazoo, June 25-July 15, 1862p. 125
Morning (Part I), July 15, 1862: Dawn Fight in the Yazoop. 151
Morning (Part II), July 15, 1862: Running the Gauntletp. 178
Surviving Farragut's Charge: Night, July 15, 1862p. 204
Arkansas vs. Essex, Round One: July 16-22, 1862p. 231
Arkansas vs. Essex, Round Two: Finale Off Baton Rouge, July 23-August 6, 1862p. 267
Epiloguep. 295
Chapter Notesp. 299
Bibliographyp. 329
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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