Catalogue


Imperial republics : revolution, war, and territorial expansion from the English Civil War to the French Revolution /
Edward G. Andrew.
imprint
Toronto, ON : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
description
xxi, 197 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1442643315 (hbk.), 9781442643314 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto, ON : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
isbn
1442643315 (hbk.)
9781442643314 (hbk.)
language note
Includes some text in French.
catalogue key
7795012
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Republicanism and imperialism are typically understood to be located at opposite ends of the political spectrum. In Imperial Republics, Edward G. Andrew challenges the supposed incompatibility of these theories with regard to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century revolutions in England, the United States, and France. Many scholars have noted the influence of the Roman state on the ideology of republican revolutionaries, especially in the model it provided for transforming subordinate subjects into autonomous citizens. Andrew finds an equally important parallel between Rome's expansionary dynamic - in contrast to that of Athens, Sparta, or Carthage - and the imperial rivalries that emerged between the United States, France, and England in the age of revolutions. ImperialRepublicsis a sophisticated, wide-ranging examination of the intellectual origins of republican movements, and explains why revolutionaries felt the need to 'don the toga' in laying the foundation for their own uprisings.
Unpaid Annotation
"Republicanism and imperialism are typically understood to be located at opposite ends of the political spectrum. In Imperial Republics, Edward G. Andrew challenges the supposed incompatibility of these theories with regard to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century revolutions in England, the United States, and France.Many scholars have noted the influence of the Roman state on the ideology of republican revolutionaries, especially in the model it provided for transforming subordinate subjects into autonomous citizens. Andrew finds an equally important parallel between Rome's expansionary dynamic - in contrast to that of Athens, Sparta, or Carthage - and the imperial rivalries that emerged between the United States, France, and England in the age of revolutions. Imperial Republics is a sophisticated, wide-ranging examination of the intellectual origins of republican movements, and explains why revolutionaries felt the need to 'don the toga' in laying the foundation for their own uprisings."--pub. desc.
Main Description
Republicanism and imperialism are typically understood to be located at opposite ends of the political spectrum. In Imperial Republics, Edward G. Andrew challenges the supposed incompatibility of these theories with regard to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century revolutions in England, the United States, and France. Many scholars have noted the influence of the Roman state on the ideology of republican revolutionaries, especially in the model it provided for transforming subordinate subjects into autonomous citizens. Andrew finds an equally important parallel between Rome's expansionary dynamic - in contrast to that of Athens, Sparta, or Carthage - and the imperial rivalries that emerged between the United States, France, and England in the age of revolutions. Imperial Republicsis a sophisticated, wide-ranging examination of the intellectual origins of republican movements, and explains why revolutionaries felt the need to 'don the toga' in laying the foundation for their own uprisings.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Rome in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 3
Machiavelli on Imperial Republicsp. 18
Republicanism and the English Civil Warp. 27
Catonic Virtue, Sweet Commerce, and Imperial Rivalryp. 49
From Colony to Nation to Empirep. 71
From Caesar to Brutus to Augustusp. 98
Le Royaume and La Patrie: Rome in Eighteenth-Century Francep. 116
The Role of Brutus in the French Revolutionp. 140
Imperial Pride and Anxiety: Gibbon's Roman Empire and Ferguson's Roman Republicp. 167
Conclusionp. 178
Indexp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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