Catalogue


Romantic generations : text, authority and posterity in British romanticism /
editor, Lene Østermark-Johansen.
imprint
Copenhagen : Museum Tusculanum Press, University of Copenhagen, 2003.
description
178 p. : ill. (1 col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
8772898607 (pbk.), 9788772898605 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Copenhagen : Museum Tusculanum Press, University of Copenhagen, 2003.
isbn
8772898607 (pbk.)
9788772898605 (pbk.)
citation/reference
Bentley, G.E., William Blake and his circle (Blake: an illustrated quarterly), v. 39, no. 1, p. 26, 28
contents note
Authentication of national identity : Macpherson and Burns as editors of Scottish ballads / Pernille Strande-Sørensen -- Those lips: on Cowper (Ekphrasis in parentheses) / Charles Lock -- William Blake and the prophetic marketplace / Robert W. Rix -- Hume, Scott and the "rise of fiction" / Ian Duncan -- Poetry and ignorance / Andrew Bennett -- Home thoughts from abroad : Wordsworth's "Musings near Aguapendente" / Peter J. Manning -- Self generations : on Wordsworth's frontispiece portraits / Peter Simonsen -- Poetic laments of P.B. Shelley: conventions, familiar mysteries, and critical responses / Karsten Engelberg -- Victorian angles on Blake: reading the artist's head in the late nineteenth century / Lene Østermark-Johansen.
catalogue key
7793572
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Bentley, G.E., Jr. 2011/10/13.
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Unlike the first two volumes of "ANGLES" on the English-Speaking World, this special issue does not originate in a set of conference papers. The idea of compiling a collection of essays on Romanticism emerged from the unusually strong concentration on Romantic studies among the graduate students of the English Department a couple of years ago. This volume places their work in the context of distinguished international scholars of greater seniority, scholars who have become academic contacts through conferences and assessment committees, and whose contributions I am very pleased to be able to include alongside the works of local contributors. The Romantic generations of the title of this volume thus strike a number of different chords: generations of scholars in Romantic studies; conventional divisions of Romantic poets into first, second and possibly third generations; the self-generative aspect of Romanticism; the awareness of poetic reputation and the image and afterlife of the poet. The collection spans just over a hundred years, from the 1780s to the 1890s, and while not in any way attempting to define Romanticism or raise issues of periodization the volume allows for the continued existence of Romantic features right until the end of the nineteenth century. Poetry looms large in this issue of ANGLES; apart from Ian Duncan's essay on 'Hume, Scott, and the "Rise of Fiction",' all the other essays are in some way concerned with the Romantic poet and his poetry. The Romantic poet is thus represented as a collector and editor of ballads, as a political radical and printmaker, as other to himself, essentially ignorant of the process of poetic composition, as a rival and collaborator with other poets, or as a poet long dead, the subject of successive generations of poetic lament. The boundaries between poetry and the visual arts is explored in a couple of the essays; indeed, the rivalry between portraiture and literature pervades no less than three of the contributions, and no matter whether the subject of inquiry is the image of the poet or the image of the poet's mother, the Romantic poet displays a high degree of self-consciousness with respect to both literary and visual media. Romantic generations generate both selves and others in poetry and portraiture.
Main Description
Unlike the first two volumes of "ANGLES" on the English-Speaking World, this special issue does not originate in a set of conference papers. The idea of compiling a collection of essays on Romanticism emerged from the unusually strong concentration on Romantic studies among the graduate students of the English Department a couple of years ago. This volume places their work in the context of distinguished international scholars of greater seniority, scholars who have become academic contacts through conferences and assessment committees, and whose contributions I am very pleased to be able to include alongside the works of local contributors. The Romantic generations of the title of this volume thus strike a number of different chords: generations of scholars in Romantic studies; conventional divisions of Romantic poets into first, second and possibly third generations; the self-generative aspect of Romanticism; the awareness of poetic reputation and the image and afterlife of the poet. The collection spans just over a hundred years, from the 1780s to the 1890s, and while not in any way attempting to define Romanticism or raise issues of periodization the volume allows for the continued existence of Romantic features right until the end of the nineteenth century. Poetry looms large in this issue of ANGLES; apart from Ian Duncan's essay on Hume, Scott, and the "Rise of Fiction",' all the other essays are in some way concerned with the Romantic poet and his poetry. The Romantic poet is thus represented as a collector and editor of ballads, as a political radical and printmaker, as other to himself, essentially ignorant of the process of poetic composition, as a rival and collaborator with other poets, or as a poet long dead, the subject of successive generations of poetic lament. The boundaries between poetry and the visual arts is explored in a couple of the essays; indeed, the rivalry between portraiture and literature pervades no less than three of the contributions, and no matter whether the subject of inquiry is the image of the poet or the image of the poet's mother, the Romantic poet displays a high degree of self-consciousness with respect to both literary and visual media. Romantic generations generate both selves and others in poetry and portraiture.
Unpaid Annotation
"Romantic Generations presents a series of essays dealing with various aspects of literary and visual self-consciousness in British Romanticism. The creative process, artistic collaboration, the image of the poet during and after his lifetime, and the establishment of textual authority are all issues explored in this volume of essays by Danish, American and British scholars within the field of Romantic Studies."
Table of Contents
List of Platesp. 7
Editor's Prefacep. 9
Authentication of National Identity: Macpherson and Burns as Editors of Scottish Balladsp. 11
Those Lips: on Cowper (Ekphrasis in Parentheses)p. 27
William Blake and the Prophetic Marketplacep. 47
Hume, Scott, and the 'Rise of Fiction'p. 63
Poetry and Ignorancep. 77
Home Thoughts From Abroad: Wordsworth's 'Musings Near Aquapendente'p. 93
Self Generations: On Wordsworth's Frontispiece Portraitsp. 113
Poetic Laments of P.B. Shelley: Conventions, Familiar Mysteries, and Critical Responsesp. 129
Victorian Angles on Blake: Reading the Artist's Head in the Late Nineteenth Centuryp. 141
Reviews
Lis Christensen, Elizabeth Bowen: The Later Fictionp. 165
Russell Duncan and David J. Klooster, editors, Phantoms of a Blood-Stained Period: The Complete Civil War Writings of Ambrose Biercep. 167
Justin D. Edwards, Gothic Passages: Racial Ambiguity and the American Gothicp. 170
Abstractsp. 173
Notes on Contributorsp. 177
Forthcoming Issuesp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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