Catalogue


A civil society deferred : the tertiary grip of violence in the Sudan /
Abdullahi A. Gallab.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
description
xxi, 239 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813036887 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780813036885 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.
isbn
0813036887 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780813036885 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
The sociopolitical construction of a country -- Constructing new identities -- The malignant tumor of the colonial state : the antibodies -- A tale of three cities : Khartoum -- A tale of three cities : Omdurman -- A tale of three cities : Cairo -- The creation of the center -- The creation of the margin.
catalogue key
7792462
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [220]-231) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Abdullahi A. Gallab, assistant professor of African and African American religious studies at Arizona State University, is the author of The First Islamist Republic: Development and Disintegration of Islamism in the Sudan.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-03-01:
Gallab (African and African American religious studies, Arizona State Univ.) adds his voice and concern to the ever-growing literature on Sudan as the country struggles to reconstruct itself amid continuous violence. Not content to offer up a simple history, the author wants to describe how Sudan was socially constructed by deconstructing, rather than merely describing, the historical process. As implied by the book's title, Gallab's view of the precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial eras is consistently negative. An epilogue commenting on the recent division of Sudan into two countries also calls for liberation from the existing repressive regime in the north. This text is somewhat jargon laden, as it misapplies some sociological concepts better suited for other concerns and contexts. Nonetheless, professionals will find this book stimulating. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. W. Arens Stony Brook University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2012
Choice, March 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A Civil Society Deferredchronicles the socio-political history and development of violence in the Sudan and explores how it has crippled the state, retarded the development of a national identity, and ravaged the social and material life of its citizens. It offers the first detailed case studies of the development of both a colonial and postcolonial Sudanese state and grounds the violence that grips the country within the conflict between imperial rule and a resisting civil society. Abdullahi Gallab establishes his discussion around three forms of violence: decentralized (individual actors using targets as a means to express a particular grievance); centralized (violence enacted illegitimately by state actors); and "home-brewed" (violence among local actors toward other local actors). The Turkiyya, the Mahdiyya, the Anglo-Egyptian, and the postcolonial states have all taken each of these forms to a degree never before experienced. The same is true for the various social and political hierarchies in the country, the Islamists, and the opposing resistance groups and liberation movements. These dichotomies have led to the creation of a political center that has sought to extend power and exploit the margins of Sudanese society. Drawing from academic, archival, and a variety of oral and written material, as well as personal experience, Gallab offers an original examination of identity and social formation in the region.
Main Description
The Sudan is old enough to have been mentioned in ancient Greek and biblical sources; but because of ongoing violence, it has yet to develop a stable political or civil society.
Description for Bookstore
"This original and revealing book is a significant contribution to the understanding of the conflicts that have gripped the Sudan for decades and may well end only in the division of the country."--Peter Woodward, author of Sudan 1898-1989and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Horn of Africa A Civil Society Deferredchronicles the socio-political history and development of violence in the Sudan and explores how it has crippled the state, retarded the development of a national identity, and ravaged the social and material life of its citizens. It offers the first detailed case studies of the development of both a colonial and postcolonial Sudanese state and grounds the violence that grips the country within the conflict between imperial rule and a resisting civil society. Abdullahi Gallab establishes his discussion around three forms of violence: decentralized (individual actors using targets as a means to express a particular grievance); centralized (violence enacted illegitimately by state actors); and "home-brewed" (violence among local actors toward other local actors). The Turkiyya, the Mahdiyya, the Anglo-Egyptian, and the postcolonial states have all taken each of these forms to a degree never before experienced. The same is true for the various social and political hierarchies in the country, the Islamists, and the opposing resistance groups and liberation movements. These dichotomies have led to the creation of a political center that has sought to extend power and exploit the margins of Sudanese society. Drawing from academic, archival, and a variety of oral and written material, as well as personal experience, Gallab offers an original examination of identity and social formation in the region. Abdullahi A. Gallab, assistant professor of African and African American religious studies at Arizona State University, is the author of The First Islamist Republic: Development and Disintegration of Islamism in the Sudan.
Description for Bookstore
"This original and revealing book is a significant contribution to the understanding of the conflicts that have gripped the Sudan for decades and may well end only in the division of the country."--Peter Woodward, author of Sudan 1898-1989and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Horn of Africa A Civil Society Deferredchronicles the socio-political history and development of violence in the Sudan and explores how it has crippled the state, retarded the development of a national identity, and ravaged the social and material life of its citizens. It offers the first detailed case studies of the development of both a colonial and postcolonial Sudanese state and grounds the violence that grips the country within the conflict between imperial rule and a resisting civil society. Abdullahi Gallab establishes his discussion around three forms of violence: decentralized (individual actors using targets as a means to express a particular grievance); centralized (violence enacted illegitimately by state actors); and "home-brewed" (violence among local actors toward other local actors). The Turkiyya, the Mahdiyya, the Anglo-British, and the postcolonial states have all taken each of these forms to a degree never before experienced. The same is true for the various social and political hierarchies in the country, the Islamists, and the opposing resistance groups and liberation movements. These dichotomies have led to the creation of a political center that has sought to extend power and exploit the margins of Sudanese society. Drawing from academic, archival, and a variety of oral and written material, as well as personal experience, Gallab offers an original examination of identity and social formation in the region. Abdullahi A. Gallab, assistant professor of African and African American religious studies at Arizona State University, is the author of The First Islamist Republic: Development and Disintegration of Islamism in the Sudan.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
A Note on Transliterationp. xxiii
The Sociopolitical Construction of a Countryp. 1
Constructing New Identitiesp. 23
The Malignant Tumor of the Colonial State: The Antibodiesp. 42
A Tale of Three Cities: Khartoump. 66
A Tale of Three Cities: Omdurmanp. 88
A Tale of Three Cities: Cairop. 114
The Creation of the Centerp. 139
The Creation of the Marginp. 164
Conclusionp. 186
Epilogue: A Missed Opportunityp. 195
Appendixp. 197
Notesp. 201
Bibliographyp. 220
Indexp. 232
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem