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Religion and the book in early modern England : the making of Foxe's Book of martyrs /
Elizabeth Evenden and Thomas S. Freeman.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xiv, 387 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780521833493 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
9780521833493 (Cloth)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. The text in its context: the printer's world in early modern Europe; 2. Ancient fragments and 'noythy bookes': the early careers of John Foxe and John Day; 3. Adversity and opportunity: Foxe and Day during Mary's reign; 4. The making of the first edition of the Acts and Monuments; 5. Sources and resources: preparing the 1570 edition; 6. 'Fayre pictures and painted pageants': the illustrations of the 'Book of Martyrs'; 7. A Parting of the Ways? Foxe and Day, 1570-76; 8. Fathers, sons and other adversaries: the background to and making of the 1583 edition; Conclusion. Foxe after Foxe: the making of the Acts and Monuments in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
abstract
"John Foxe's Acts and Monuments - popularly known as the 'Book of Martyrs' - is a milestone in the history of the English book. An essential history of the English Reformation and a seminal product of it, no English book before it had been as long or as lavishly illustrated. Examining the research behind the work and also its financing, printing and dissemination, Elizabeth Evenden and Thomas S. Freeman argue that, apart from Foxe's zeal and industry, the book was only made possible by extensive cooperation between its printer, John Day, and the Elizabethan government. Government patronage, rather than market forces, lay behind the book's success and ensured the triumph of a Protestant interpretation of the Reformation for centuries to come. Based on little-used manuscript sources, this book offers a unique insight not only into the 'Book of Martyrs' and the history of the English book, but into English history itself"--
"The word 'book' incorporates two related but separate concepts. The first is of the book as a text, which embodies the thoughts and attitudes of its author or authors. Thus we speak of the books of Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud, or Karl Marx, when what we really mean are the ideas and concepts presented by these authors, rather than the physical books themselves. Yet a printed book is also a material object, as well as a compendium of ideas and beliefs. Moreover, it is a material object which is only created by means of specialised labour and equipment. The production of printed books in early modern Europe was the result of a complex, cumbersome and costly industrial process. To comprehend fully the contents and influence of an early modern 'book', in the first sense of the word, it is desirable, sometimes even necessary, to understand the physical process by which it was created"--
catalogue key
7781043
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 351-373) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'An important study of the making of the book in sixteenth-century England, providing illuminating details of the process.' Northern History
'A voyage of discovery … It is rare to find a book that so effectively combines cutting-edge scholarship with a vivid sense of the lived reality of the past.' Church Times
'Elizabeth Evenden and Thomas Freeman's [book] is a welcome complement to John N. King's Foxe's 'Book of Martyrs' and Early Modern Print Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2006) … together these volumes … stand as a comprehensive account of the history of this important book, and they should serve as the foundational monographs for any future study of Foxe, historical or literary.' Ryan Netzley, Journal of British Studies
'... well written and readable ... and there are welcome touches of humour ... A great deal of impressive work has been produced by the network of scholars involved [in the study of Foxe's 'Acts and Monuments'], and this book touches only briefly on the conclusions they have already reached in order to focus on new material about Foxe and his book. It is best understood, therefore, in the context of the wider research effort, but it is a great achievement in its own right. By anchoring Foxe's work in its material culture, it has told us a great deal about the life of the book in general, as well as the life of this book in particular ... [Foxe's 'Book of Martyrs'] helped to define early modern England, and this book brings us a lot closer to understanding how that was possible.' Lucy Wooding, Times Higher Education
"...well written and readable. The authors have almost, but not completely, concealed their affection for the two inspired, intractable, zealous individuals at the centre of the story, and there are welcome touches of humour...A great deal of impressive work has been produced by the network of scholars involved [in the study of Foxe's Acts and Monuments], and this book touches only briefly on the conclusions they have already reached in order to focus on new material about Foxe and his book. It is best understood, therefore, in the context of the wider research effort, but it is a great achievement in its own right. By anchoring Foxe's work in its material culture, it has told us a great deal about the life of the book in general, as well as the life of this book in particular...[Foxe's "Book of Martyrs"] helped to define early modern England, and this book brings us a lot closer to understanding how that was possible."- Lucy Wooding, Times Higher Education Supplement
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
John Foxe's 'Acts and Monuments' - popularly known as the 'Book of Martyrs' - is a milestone in the history of the English book. Based on little-used manuscript sources, this study explores the production of this seminal product of the English Reformation.
Description for Bookstore
John Foxe's Acts and Monuments - popularly known as the 'Book of Martyrs' - is a milestone in the history of the English book. Based on little-used manuscript sources, this unique study explores the production of this seminal product of the English Reformation.
Main Description
John Foxe's Acts and Monuments - popularly known as the 'Book of Martyrs' - is a milestone in the history of the English book. An essential history of the English Reformation and a seminal product of it, no English book before it had been as long or as lavishly illustrated. Examining the research behind the work and also its financing, printing and dissemination, Elizabeth Evenden and Thomas S. Freeman argue that, apart from Foxe's zeal and industry, the book was only made possible by extensive cooperation between its printer, John Day, and the Elizabethan government. Government patronage, rather than market forces, lay behind the book's success and ensured the triumph of a Protestant interpretation of the Reformation for centuries to come. Based on little-used manuscript sources, this book offers a unique insight not only into the 'Book of Martyrs' and the history of the English book, but into English history itself.
Main Description
John Foxe's Acts and Monuments - popularly known as the 'Book of Martyrs' - is a milestone in the history of the English book. An essential history of the English Reformation and a seminal product of it, no English printed book before it had been as long or as lavishly illustrated. Examining the research behind the work and also its financing, printing and dissemination, Elizabeth Evenden and Thomas S. Freeman argue that, apart from Foxe's zeal and industry, the book was only made possible by extensive cooperation between its printer, John Day, and the Elizabethan government. Government patronage, rather than market forces, lay behind the book's success and ensured the triumph of a Protestant interpretation of the Reformation for centuries to come. Based on little-used manuscript sources, this book offers a unique insight not only into the 'Book of Martyrs' and the history of the English book, but into English history itself.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. x
List of abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The text in its context: the printer's world in early modern Europep. 6
Ancient fragments and 'noythy bokes': the early careers of John Foxe and John Dayp. 33
Adversity and opportunity: Foxe and Day during Mary's reignp. 69
The making of the first edition of the Acts and Monumentsp. 102
Sources and resources: preparing the 1570 editionp. 135
'Fayre pictures and painted pageants': the illustrations of the 'Book of Martyrs'p. 186
A parting of the ways? Foxe and Day, 1570-1576p. 232
Fathers, sons and other adversaries: the making of the 1583 editionp. 278
Conclusion: Foxe after Foxe: the making of the Acts and Monuments in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuriesp. 320
Glossaryp. 348
Select bibliographyp. 351
Indexp. 374
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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