Catalogue


The politics of fashion in eighteenth-century America /
Kate Haulman.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
description
xiv, 290 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0807834874 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807834879 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
isbn
0807834874 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807834879 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : that strange, ridic'lous vice -- The many faces of fashion in the early eighteenth century -- Fops and coquettes : gender, sexuality, and status -- Country modes : cultural politics and political resistance -- New duties and old desires on the eve of revolution -- A contest of modes in revolutionary Philadelphia -- Fashion and nation -- Epilogue : political habits and citizenship's corset : the 1790s and beyond.
catalogue key
7781017
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Haulman explores how and why fashion--both as a concept and as the changing style of personal adornment-- shaped the revolutionary-era struggles of the 1760s and 1770s, influenced national political debates, and helped to secure the exclusions of the new political order in eighteenth-century America
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-04-01:
Historian Haulman's answer to a seemingly straightforward question--What role did fashion play in the politics of the British North American colonies in the 18th century?--is nuanced and complex. Focusing on major port cities, the author (American Univ.) considers the often-ambivalent attitudes toward fashion that prevailed among the American gentry. Fashion was an important part of the British economy and a marker of status and breeding, but at the same time it could be manipulated, allowing the unworthy to pass as their social betters; while some attention to fashion was required of both men and women, men's obsession with appearance could undermine gender boundaries. When the colonies began to argue with Parliament over taxation, the political significance of fashion increased alongside demands that American men and women show their support of the patriot cause by wearing unfashionable but virtuous home-produced styles. This discourse continued into the 1790s, particularly when the Federalist government attempted to improve the American economy by protecting domestic cloth producers. Haulman successfully explains popular debates over the meaning of fashion without oversimplifying her analysis. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. R. A. Standish San Joaquin Delta College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Presents a subtle and detailed narrative of the changing ways that Anglo-Americans thought and argued about what to wear and what it meant." - Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography
"The book, several years in the making, displays Haulman's easy command of her subject and source material. . . . Without losing sight of the big picture, she pays focused attention to a few well-chosen artifacts and texts." - Women's Review of Books
"Novel, richly detailed, and deeply researched, Kate Haulman's book is both a revolutionary history of the meaning of fashionability in early America and a chronicle of the evolution of the transatlantic fashion system. Never have the changes within the world of dress been presented with such thoroughness or their cultural significance been glossed with such specification and care."--David Shields, University of South Carolina
"Offers a number of fascinating insights into the ordering of power and American social relations in the eighteenth century. . . . Beautifully detailed and arresting set pieces that sparkle through the pages of her book, like gems strung together on an intricate necklace." - William and Mary Quarterly
"One of the most effective aspects of Haulman's book is the way she treats fashion in many different ways without losing the unity of her argument. . . . [She] successfully mixes methods from cultural anthropology, literary studies, and sociology." - The Historian
"In this original interpretation, Kate Haulman makes the luxuries of clothing and accoutrements--the details of their trade, their changing design, and the uses to which women and men put them--central to our understanding of imperial relations in the era of the American Revolution and the early republic."--Linda K. Kerber, author of ###No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship#
"In this original interpretation, Kate Haulman makes the luxuries of clothing and accoutrements--the details of their trade, their changing design, and the uses to which women and men put them--central to our understanding of imperial relations in the era of the American Revolution and the early republic."--Linda K. Kerber, author of No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship
"Haulman successfully explains popular debates over the meaning of fashion without oversimplifying her analysis. Recommended. All academic levels/libraries." - Choice
"Haulman successfully explains popular debates over the meaning of fashion without oversimplifying her analysis. Recommended. All academic levels/libraries." - Journal of American Culture
"An exciting, deeply researched work that examines the intersection of American culture and the changing nature of politics surrounding the American Revolution . . . . It would greatly benefit graduate students and researchers of early American life, specifically those with interests in politics, culture, and society." - Journal of American Culture
"Haulman [has an] ability to capture the telling details that made the colonial social experience distinct." - New England Quarterly
"Haulman's book is a significant contribution to our understanding of eighteenth-century culture, gender, and politics, and it is, quite frankly, very fun to read." - Journal of Southern History
"Haulman's terrific examination of the gendered implications of fashion is magnificently subtle and detailed. . . . [This book] will be important reading for scholars of gender, revolutionary political culture, and early American studies." - American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In eighteenth-century America, fashion served as a site of contests over various forms of gendered power. Here, Kate Haulman explores how and why fashion--both as a concept and as the changing style of personal adornment--linked gender relations, social order, commerce, and political authority during a time when traditional hierarchies were in flux. In the see-and-be-seen port cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Charleston, fashion, a form of power and distinction, was conceptually feminized yet pursued by both men and women across class ranks. Haulman shows that elite men and women in these cities relied on fashion to present their status but also attempted to undercut its ability to do so for others. Disdain for others' fashionability was a means of safeguarding social position in cities where the modes of dress were particularly fluid and a way to maintain gender hierarchy in a world in which women's power as consumers was expanding. Concerns over gendered power expressed through fashion in dress, Haulman reveals, shaped the revolutionary-era struggles of the 1760s and 1770s, influenced national political debates, and helped to secure the exclusions of the new political order.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 18th-century America, fashion served as a site of contests over various forms of gendered power. Here, Kate Haulman explores how and why fashion linked gender relations, social order, commerce, and political authority during a time when traditional hierarchies were in flux.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: That Strange, Ridic'lous Vicep. 1
The Many Faces of Fashion in the Early Eighteenth Centuryp. 11
Fops and Coquettes Gender, Sexuality, and Statusp. 47
Country Modes Cultural Politics and Political Resistancep. 81
New Duties and Old Desires on the Eve of Revolutionp. 117
A Contest of Modes in Revolutionary Philadelphiap. 153
Fashion and Nationp. 181
Epilogue: Political Habits and Citizenship's Corset The 1790s and Beyondp. 217
Notesp. 227
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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