Catalogue


The president is a sick man : wherein the supposedly virtuous Grover Cleveland survives a secret surgery at sea and vilifies the courageous newspaperman who dared expose the truth /
Matthew Algeo.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Chicago : Chicago Review Press, c2011.
description
x, 255 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
156976350X (hardcover), 9781569763506 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : Chicago Review Press, c2011.
isbn
156976350X (hardcover)
9781569763506 (hardcover)
contents note
The operation -- A rough spot -- Big Steve -- The dread disease -- Dr. Keen -- The Oneida -- The scoop -- The cover-up -- The newspaperman -- Exposed -- Liar -- Vindication -- Aftermath -- The truth (at last) -- Postmortem.
catalogue key
7778126
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 237-242) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2011-03-07:
Despite a reputation for honesty, says Algeo (Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure), "President Grover Cleveland, like FDR and JFK, went to great lengths to hide an illness from the public. In June 1893, having told the New York Times he was going away for a rest, Cleveland secretly boarded a friend's yacht and disappeared for five days as surgeons onboard removed a cancerous tumor from his mouth and much of his upper jaw. Reporters at the Cleveland's Cape Cod summer home became curious when the Oneida failed to arrive. Within weeks, Philadelphia Press reporter E.J. Edwards revealed the truth in "one of the greatest scoops in... American journalism," but the public accepted the official denials. Maligned by rival newspapers, Edwards was branded as "a disgrace to journalism," his career "seemingly tainted forever by allegations that he had faked the story." But he was vindicated in 1917 when the facts were finally revealed in a Saturday Evening Post article. Along with a solid reconstruction of these events, Algeo paints a colorful portrait of political intrigue and journalism during the Gilded Age. B&w photos. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-03-15:
In 1893, during his second term, President Cleveland went on a yacht trip from New York City without providing details to his cabinet, his vice president, the press, or the public. Cleveland, known for honesty, secretly had a cancerous tumor removed from his jaw. Algeo (Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure: The True Story of a Great American Road Trip) makes good use of primary and secondary sources to give general readers a full history of these circumstances, known to presidential and medical historians but to few others. An investigative journalist who sought to reveal the truth was vilified by the skeptical public; one of the participating physicians published the story in 1917, almost ten years after Cleveland's death. Algeo explains the reasons for Cleveland's discretion: the country was in a financial panic, vice president Adlai Stevenson opposed the President on the matter of hard money policies, and Cleveland did not want to lose the upper hand. VERDICT Algeo's colloquial, even punchy account fills out our understanding of a press-shy President, the day's newspaper rivalries, and the role of First Lady Frances Folsom Cleveland. Recommended for those who enjoy popular presidential histories and biographies, the history of U.S. newspaper reporting, and popular medical nonfiction.-Frederick J. Augustyn Jr., Library of Congress (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] brilliantly written historical perspective . . . . Readers will be fascinated by this must read for anyone interested in presidential medical history." -- Dr. Connie Mariano, White House Doctor (1992-2001), author of The White House Doctor
"[A] brilliantly written historical perspective . . . . Readers will be fascinated by this must read for anyone interested in presidential medical history." --Dr. Connie Mariano, White House Doctor (1992-2001), author of The White House Doctor
"Algeo is a determined researcher and fine stylist, and the story of presidential illness serves as an effective connecting thread through a somewhat broader account of the United States during the hard economic times of the 1890s. A memorable lesson in how journalists can dig out the truths beneath official lies." -- Kirkus Reviews
"Algeo paints a colorful portrait of political intrigue and journalism during the Gilded Age." -- Publishers Weekly
"Author Matthew Algeo takes a little known part of presidential history and creates a page-turning ride in The President Is a Sick Man." --The Associated Press
"Recommended for those who enjoy popular presidential histories and biographies, the history of U.S. newspaper reporting, and popular medical nonfiction." -- Library Journal
"Riveting and engrossing as the best detective novel, The President Is a Sick Manis an exceedingly well-documented and overdue account of one of the great presidential cover-ups of all time." -- James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power
"Riveting and engrossing as the best detective novel, The President Is a Sick Manis an exceedingly well-documented and overdue account of one of the great presidential cover-ups of all time." --James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power
" The President Is a Sick Manis a lively, cautionary tale--and one with a lesson for leaders that recalls Cleveland's own words of wisdom: Tell the truth." -- The Wall Street Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, March 2011
Library Journal, March 2011
Publishers Weekly, March 2011
Wall Street Journal, May 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
An extraordinary yet almost unknown chapter in American history is revealed in this extensively researched expose. On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend's yacht and was not heard from for five days. During that time, a team of doctors removed a cancerous tumor from the president's palate along with much of his upper jaw. When an enterprising reporter named E. J. Edwards exposed the secret operation, Cleveland denied it and Edwards was consequently dismissed as a disgrace to journalism. Twenty-four years later, one of the president's doctors finally revealed the incredible truth, but many Americans simply would not believe it. After all, Grover Cleveland's political career was built upon honesty-his most memorable quote was "Tell the truth"--so it was nearly impossible to believe he was involved in such a brazen cover-up. This is the first full account of the disappearance of Grover Cleveland during that summer more than a century ago.
Main Description
On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland vanished. He boarded a friend's yacht, sailed into the calm blue waters of Long Island Sound, and--poof!--disappeared. He would not be heard from again for five days. What happened during those five days, and in the days and weeks that followed, was so incredible that, even when the truth was finally revealed, many Americans simply would not believe it. The President Is a Sick Mandetails an extraordinary but almost unknown chapter in American history: Grover Cleveland's secret cancer surgery and the brazen political cover-up by a politician whose most memorable quote was "Tell the truth." When an enterprising reporter named E. J. Edwards exposed the secret operation, Cleveland denied it. The public believed the "Honest President," and Edwards was dismissed as "a disgrace to journalism." The facts concerning the disappearance of Grover Cleveland that summer were so well concealed that even more than a century later a full and fair account has never been published. Until now.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
The Operation
A Rough Spotp. 5
Big Stevep. 19
The Dread Diseasep. 39
Dr. Keenp. 63
The Oneidap. 81
The Scoop
The Cover-Upp. 101
The Newspapermanp. 127
Exposedp. 141
Liarp. 155
Vindication
Aftermathp. 177
The Truth (at Last)p. 207
Postmortemp. 217
Acknowledgmentsp. 229
Cast of Charactersp. 231
Sourcesp. 235
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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