Catalogue

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The two narratives of political economy /
original material selected and edited by Nicholas Capaldi and Gordon Lloyd.
imprint
Salem, Mass. : Scrivener ; Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2011.
description
xxxiii, 473 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0470948299 (Cloth), 9780470948293 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Salem, Mass. : Scrivener ; Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2011.
isbn
0470948299 (Cloth)
9780470948293 (Cloth)
general note
"Political economy from the 17th century to the present can be captured in two narratives originating with Locke and Rousseau. Those original narratives were expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the editors argue that they still hold sway today."--P. [4] of cover.
Contains source documents, some in excerpted, translated, and edited form.
language note
Includes translations from German and French.
catalogue key
7778107
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nicholas Capaldi is Legendre-Soule Distinguished Chair in Business Ethics at Loyola University, New Orleans. His highly-praised biography of John Stuart Mill was featured on C-Span's BookNotes. Gordon Lloyd is a Professor of Public Policy, School of Public Policy at Pepperdine University. The co-author of three books on the American founding and sole author of The Two Faces of Liberalism, which examines the political economy of the New Deal. He is the creator of three highly regarded websites on the creation and adoption of the Constitution.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Nonetheless, the book is impressive for its topical breadth ... In this light, I'll be very interested in seeing what an updated edition of this volume might look like in another decade or two. ( Conversations on Philanthropy , 2012)
"Nonetheless, the book is impressive for its topical breadth … In this light, I'll be very interested in seeing what an updated edition of this volume might look like in another decade or two. ( Conversations on Philanthropy , 2012)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume take a unique approach to the subject of political economy. It cuts across philosophy, economics, and political science so it has wide readership potential.
Long Description
Captures the 17th-19th century origins and developments ofpolitical economy by editing original texts and illuminatingtheir relevance for today's political debatePolitical economy from the 17th century to the present can be captured in two narratives originating with Locke and Rousseau. Those original narratives were expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the editors argue that they still hold sway today.Edited original writings included in the anthology are from: Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Proudhon, Owen, the Federalist Papers, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, and the American Constitution. The editors have restricted their comments to the extensive introductions thereby allowing the original participants to speak for themselves. The readings included are intended to be instructive with respect to the origin and development of the two narratives rather than an exhaustive account of how thinkers and writers on economics advance the discipline of economics as a social science.Reviews"The editors provide a compelling collection to critically frame the clash of Political Economy which shapes modern democracies. Their selections and introductions expertly paint a picture of the contending schools to suggest how enduring these core challenges remain. By placing these writers within this great debate, the authors guide students to discover the essential questions of liberty, equality, and the proper role of the state at the core of the American economic debate." -Roberta Q. Herzberg, Utah State University Political Science"The real service performed by Capaldi and Lloyd is to provide generous excerpts from supporters of both narratives so that the reader can determine for themselves who best makes their case. I recommend this volume highly both to the individual interested in learning about the intellectual and political history of political economy and to the professor in search of a one-volume anthology on political economy for use in course on economic thought." -Steven D. Ealy, Senior Fellow, Liberty Fund, Inc.Nicholas Capaldi is Legendre-Soul_ Distinguished Chair in Business Ethics at Loyola University, New Orleans. His highly-praised biography of John Stuart Mill was featured on C-SPAN's BookNotes.
Main Description
Captures the 17th-19th century origins and developments ofpolitical economy by editing original texts and illuminatingtheir relevance for today's political debate Political economy from the 17th century to the present can be captured in two narratives originating with Locke and Rousseau. Those original narratives were expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the editors argue that they still hold sway today. Edited original writings included in the anthology are from: Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Proudhon, Owen, the Federalist Papers, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, and the American Constitution. The editors have restricted their comments to the extensive introductions thereby allowing the original participants to speak for themselves. The readings included are intended to be instructive with respect to the origin and development of the two narratives rather than an exhaustive account of how thinkers and writers on economics advance the discipline of economics as a social science. Reviews "The editors provide a compelling collection to critically frame the clash of Political Economy which shapes modern democracies. Their selections and introductions expertly paint a picture of the contending schools to suggest how enduring these core challenges remain. By placing these writers within this great debate, the authors guide students to discover the essential questions of liberty, equality, and the proper role of the state at the core of the American economic debate." Roberta Q. Herzberg , Utah State University Political Science "The real service performed by Capaldi and Lloyd is to provide generous excerpts from supporters of both narratives so that the reader can determine for themselves who best makes their case. I recommend this volume highly both to the individual interested in learning about the intellectual and political history of political economy and to the professor in search of a one-volume anthology on political economy for use in a course on economic thought." Steven D. Ealy , Senior Fellow, Liberty Fund, Inc.
Main Description
Captures the 17th-19th century origins and developments ofpolitical economy by editing original texts and illuminatingtheir relevance for todays political debate Political economy from the 17th century to the present can be captured in two narratives originating with Locke and Rousseau. Those original narratives were expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the editors argue that they still hold sway today. Edited original writings included in the anthology are from: Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Proudhon, Owen, the Federalist Papers, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, and the American Constitution. The editors have restricted their comments to the extensive introductions thereby allowing the original participants to speak for themselves. The readings included are intended to be instructive with respect to the origin and development of the two narratives rather than an exhaustive account of how thinkers and writers on economics advance the discipline of economics as a social science. Reviews "The editors provide a compelling collection to critically frame the clash of Political Economy which shapes modern democracies. Their selections and introductions expertly paint a picture of the contending schools to suggest how enduring these core challenges remain. By placing these writers within this great debate, the authors guide students to discover the essential questions of liberty, equality, and the proper role of the state at the core of the American economic debate." - Roberta Q. Herzberg , Utah State University Political Science "The real service performed by Capaldi and Lloyd is to provide generous excerpts from supporters of both narratives so that the reader can determine for themselves who best makes their case. I recommend this volume highly both to the individual interested in learning about the intellectual and political history of political economy and to the professor in search of a one-volume anthology on political economy for use in a course on economic thought." - Steven D. Ealy , Senior Fellow, Liberty Fund, Inc.
Main Description
Captures the 17th-19th century origins and developments ofpolitical economy by editing original texts and illuminatingtheir relevance for today's political debatePolitical economy from the 17th century to the present can be captured in two narratives originating with Locke and Rousseau. Those original narratives were expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the editors argue that they still hold sway today.Edited original writings included in the anthology are from: Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Proudhon, Owen, the Federalist Papers, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, and the American Constitution. The editors have restricted their comments to the extensive introductions thereby allowing the original participants to speak for themselves. The readings included are intended to be instructive with respect to the origin and development of the two narratives rather than an exhaustive account of how thinkers and writers on economics advance the discipline of economics as a social science.Reviews"The editors provide a compelling collection to critically frame the clash of Political Economy which shapes modern democracies. Their selections and introductions expertly paint a picture of the contending schools to suggest how enduring these core challenges remain. By placing these writers within this great debate, the authors guide students to discover the essential questions of liberty, equality, and the proper role of the state at the core of the American economic debate." Roberta Q. Herzberg, Utah State University Political Science"The real service performed by Capaldi and Lloyd is to provide generous excerpts from supporters of both narratives so that the reader can determine for themselves who best makes their case. I recommend this volume highly both to the individual interested in learning about the intellectual and political history of political economy and to the professor in search of a one-volume anthology on political economy for use in course on economic thought." Steven D. Ealy, Senior Fellow, Liberty Fund, Inc.
Main Description
Political economy from the 17th century to the present can be captured in two narratives originating with Locke and Rousseau. Those original narratives were expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the editors argue that they still hold sway today.Edited original writings included in the anthology are from: Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Proudhon, Owen, the Federalist Papers, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, and the American Constitution. The editors have restricted their comments to the extensive introductions thereby allowing the original participants to speak for themselves. The readings included are intended to be instructive with respect to the origin and development of the two narratives rather than an exhaustive account of how thinkers and writers on economics advance the discipline of economics as a social science."The editors provide a compelling collection to critically frame the clash of Political Economy which shapes modern democracies. Their selections and introductions expertly paint a picture of the contending schools to suggest how enduring these core challenges remain. By placing these writers within this great debate, the authors guide students to discover the essential questions of liberty, equality, and the proper role of the state at the core of the American economic debate." Roberta Q. Herzberg, Utah State University, Political Science"The real service performed by Capaldi and Lloyd is to provide generous excerpts from supporters of both narratives so that the reader can determine for themselves who best makes their case. I recommend this volume highly both to the individual interested in learning about the intellectual and political history of political economy and to the professor in search of a one-volume anthology on political economy for use in course on economic thought." Steven D. Ealy, Senior Fellow, Liberty Fund, Inc."The authors have assembled an impressively representative array of materials and have convincingly located the origins of contemporary political and economic thought in Enlightenment philosophy. The book is both timely and of abiding relevance to anyone who wishes to gain a better understanding of what lies in the past, present, or future of political economy and political philosophy." Kevin Honeycutt, Sweet Briar College
Main Description
This is an anthology of political economy from the 17 th to the 19 th century. The main theme is that all of political economy from the 17 th century to the very present can be captured in two narratives originating in Locke and Rousseau respectively. Those original narratives are expanded in significant ways in the 18th and 19 th centuries and the editors argue that they still hold sway today. Edited original writings included in the anthology are from: Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Proudhon, Owen, as well as the Federalist Papers, French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, and the American Constitution. The editors have restricted their comments to the extensive introductions thereby allowing the original participants to speak for themselves. The readings included are intended to be instructive with respect to the origin and development of the two narratives rather than an exhaustive account of how thinkers and writers on economics advance the project of economics as a social science.The objective of this book is to retrieve these two narratives in order to apply the rediscoveries to the contemporary situation. At the heart is the claim that there are two narratives at work both in the normative and empirical sense: the liberty narrative and the equality narrative. Both these narratives are informed by two versions of the enlightenment. Both of these narratives undergo internal intellectual challenges as the enlightenment understanding of physical and human nature are subjected to criticism."The authors have assembled an impressively representative array of materials and have convincingly located the origins of contemporary political and economic thought in Enlightenment philosophy. The book is both timely and of abiding relevance to anyone who wishes to gain a better understanding of what lies in the past, present, or future of political economy and political philosophy." Kevin Honeycutt, Sweet Briar College
Main Description
This publication uniquely reintegrates and makes comprehensible all public policy debate from the fields of philosophy, economics, and political science since the Enlightenment. It includes original material from scholars and thinkers in the 17 th , 18 th , and 19 th centuries together with extensive introductions by the authors to explain the context. This book presents an in-depth exploration of the origins of the current political debate in the U.S. between the Republican and Democrat positions on issues to do with social and economic policy.
Table of Contents
Editors' Notep. vii
General Introductionp. xi
The Emergence of Political Economy: Economic Activity Leaves the Household
Introductionp. 3
The Second Treatisep. 9
A Letter Concerning Tolerationp. 33
Some Considerations of the Lowering of Interest and the Raising the Value of Moneyp. 47
The Two Discoursesp. 57
A Discourse on Political Economyp. 79
The Social Contractp. 87
The Arrival of Political Economy: Liberty, Property, and Equality
Introductionp. 97
Wealth of Nationsp. 109
The Theory of Moral Sentimentsp. 161
The American Foundingp. 163
Democracy in Americap. 179
The French Revolutionp. 209
A New View of Societyp. 229
Nouveau Christianismep. 241
Friedrich List National Systemp. 243
The Philosophy of Povertyp. 247
What is Property?p. 265
The Maturation of the Two Narratives: The Challenge of Social Economy
Introductionp. 285
The Principles of Political Economyp. 295
On Libertyp. 345
The Subjection of Womenp. 373
The Communist Manifestop. 389
Das Kapitalp. 409
Socialism: Utopian and Scientificp. 447
Indexp. 467
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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