Catalogue


Tyrant memory /
Horacio Castellanos Moya ; translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver.
imprint
New York : New Directions, c2011.
description
270 p.
ISBN
0811219178 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780811219174 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
uniform title
imprint
New York : New Directions, c2011.
isbn
0811219178 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780811219174 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
Originally published in Spain as: Tirana memoria.
catalogue key
7777571
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2011-05-30:
Moya's absorbing new novel is set in early 1944 El Salvador after a coup fails to depose real life pro-Nazi dictator Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez. Members of Moya's fictional Aragon family play unexpected roles in the uprising: With her husband in prison, well-connected matriarch Haydee must handle the crises that befall her family, such as when their newscaster son, Clemente, announces on-air that the dictator is dead, an error that could cost him his life. His cousin Jimmy, a tough military captain involved in the coup, helps the pampered Clemente escape (Clemente's entitled whining and Jimmy's bravado make for some very funny scenes). The story unfolds largely through Haydee's diary, documenting her growth into solidarity with the politically oppressed; at great risk, she becomes involved in a general strike that eventually ousts the dictator. Moya (The She-Devil in the Mirror) has an unlikely heroine in Haydee, but she possesses one quality that her husband lacks: she's not been corrupted or disillusioned by politics. This intriguing novel turns the spotlight from the rulers onto the hopeful souls who will tolerate tyranny for only so long. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-08-01:
This page-turner by Castellanos Moya (Senselessness) follows the fictional diary of Dona Haydee Baldoni, whose husband, Pericles, and son, Clemente, risk reprisals after an unsuccessful coup against Salvadoran strongman Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez. To justify his brutality, this "Nazi warlock," who ruled El Salvador from 1931 to 1944, dabbled in the occult, famously claiming that it's better to kill a man than an ant, for when a man dies he is reincarnated, while an ant dies forever. At first the military-minded Pericles is recruited by the new regime as ambassador to Belgium, where in the heady decade of the Spanish civil war he converts to communism. Once Pericles runs afoul of the regime back home, his wife watches as furor wells up against Martinez and evolves her own breed of heroism that helps topple him. Despite an occasional reference to World War II, the narrative does not bog down in historical details and could easily take place in the present. More analytical than violent and not devoid of humor, the novel sheds light on a tragic aspect of Latin American life. VERDICT For politically minded saga lovers, but also for those who relish a well-told story.-Jack Shreve, Allegany Coll. of Maryland, Cumberland (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Tyrant Memory stands out because of its scrupulous evocation of an atmosphere of conspiracy and its use of historical events.
The only writer of my generation who knows how to narrate the horror, the secret Vietnam that Latin America was for a long time.
A welcome, eye-opening addition to this new literature of the Latin American nightmare.
Brilliantly funny and unsettling. Despite his estrangement from his country and his merciless criticism of it, he has put El Salvador on the literary map, giving it an international existence.
Castellanos Moya can be a brilliant practitioner of edge of collapse, culling searing narratives of exile and estrangement.
"In Tyrant Memory, Castellanos Moya's ambitious and defthandling of his characters' stories and political milieus reveal a writerunparalleled in his ability to portray the anxieties and messy complexities ofpolitical and personal turmoil."
In Tyrant Memory, Castellanos Moya's ambitious and defthandling of his characters' stories and political milieus reveal a writerunparalleled in his ability to portray the anxieties and messy complexities ofpolitical and personal turmoil.
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, May 2011
Booklist, June 2011
New York Times Book Review, July 2011
New York Times Full Text Review, July 2011
Library Journal, August 2011
Wall Street Journal, August 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The tyrant of Horacio Castellanos Moya's ambitious new novel is the actual pro-Nazi mystic Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez - known as the Warlock - who came to power in El Salvador in 1932. An attempted coup in April, 1944, failed, but a general strike in May finally forced him out of office. Tyrant Memory takes place during the month between the coup and the strike. Its protagonist, Haydee Aragon, is a well-off woman, whose husband is a political prisoner and whose son, Clemente, after prematurely announcing the dictator's death over national radio during the failed coup, is forced to flee when the very much alive Warlock starts to ruthlessly hunt down his enemies. The novel moves between Haydee's political awakening in diary entries and Clemente's frantic and often hysterically comic efforts to escape capture. Tyrant Memory - sharp, grotesque, moving, and often hilariously funny - is an unforgettable incarnation of a coun- try's history in the destiny of one family.
Main Description
The tyrant of Horacio Castellanos Moya s ambitious new novel is the actual pro-Nazi mystic Maximiliano Herna ndez Marti nez known as the Warlock who came to power in El Salvador in 1932. An attempted coup in April, 1944, failed, but a general strike in May finally forced him out of office. Tyrant Memory takes place during the month between the coup and the strike. Its protagonist, Hayde e Aragon, is a well-off woman, whose husband is a political prisoner and whose son, Clemente, after prematurely announcing the dictator s death over national radio during the failed coup, is forced to flee when the very much alive Warlock starts to ruthlessly hunt down his enemies. The novel moves between Hayde e s political awakening in diary entries and Clemente s frantic and often hysterically comic efforts to escape capture. Tyrant Memory sharp, grotesque, moving, and often hilariously funny is an unforgettable incarnation of a coun- try s history in the destiny of one family.
Main Description
The tyrant of Horacio Castellanos Moya "s ambitious new novel is the actual pro-Nazi mystic Maximiliano Herna ndez Marti nez ” known as the Warlock ” who came to power in El Salvador in 1932. An attempted coup in April, 1944, failed, but a general strike in May finally forced him out of office. Tyrant Memory takes place during the month between the coup and the strike. Its protagonist, Hayde e Aragon, is a well-off woman, whose husband is a political prisoner and whose son, Clemente, after prematurely announcing the dictator "s death over national radio during the failed coup, is forced to flee when the very much alive Warlock starts to ruthlessly hunt down his enemies. The novel moves between Hayde e "s political awakening in diary entries and Clemente "s frantic and often hysterically comic efforts to escape capture. Tyrant Memory ” sharp, grotesque, moving, and often hilariously funny ” is an unforgettable incarnation of a coun- try "s history in the destiny of one family.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem