Catalogue


An unfinished republic : leading by word and deed in modern China /
David Strand.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011.
description
xiv, 387 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520267362 (cloth : acid-free paper), 9780520267367 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011.
isbn
0520267362 (cloth : acid-free paper)
9780520267367 (cloth : acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction: Republican China -- Slapping Song Jiaoren -- Speaking parts in Chinese history -- A woman's Republic -- Seeing like a citizen -- Losing a speech -- Sun Yat-sen's last words -- Conclusion: Leading and being led.
catalogue key
7777458
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-372) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Strand eloquently joins political theories to historical reinterpretation, offering a cogent and multifaceted re-reading of China's political culture in the twentieth century. An Unfinished Republic is a stunning book of scholarly imagination, diligence, and sophistication."--Wen-hsin Yeh, Richard H. & Laurie C. Morrison Professor in History, Walter & Elise Haas Professor in Asian Studies, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley "An Unfinished Republicproposes a compelling new interpretation of early twentieth century Chinese history. It opens up unvisited avenues of inquiry into the uniquely Chinese mode and meaning of Republicanism and remaps the trajectory of Chinese politics over the course of the century. Strand is a particularly thoughtful and well-read scholar, who commands knowledge of a range of literatures including political science, cultural history, women's history and political philosophy. He adeptly uses tools from all of these fields to support fresh insight into how Chinese Republicanism was understood, and more importantly, into how it was practiced."--Joan Judge, author ofThe Precious Raft of History: The Past, the West, and the Woman Question in China
Flap Copy
"Strand eloquently joins political theories to historical reinterpretation, offering a cogent and multifaceted re-reading of China's political culture in the twentieth century. An Unfinished Republic is a stunning book of scholarly imagination, diligence, and sophistication."--Wen-hsin Yeh, Richard H. & Laurie C. Morrison Professor in History, Walter & Elise Haas Professor in Asian Studies, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley " An Unfinished Republicproposes a compelling new interpretation of early twentieth century Chinese history. It opens up unvisited avenues of inquiry into the uniquely Chinese mode and meaning of Republicanism and remaps the trajectory of Chinese politics over the course of the century. Strand is a particularly thoughtful and well-read scholar, who commands knowledge of a range of literatures including political science, cultural history, women's history and political philosophy. He adeptly uses tools from all of these fields to support fresh insight into how Chinese Republicanism was understood, and more importantly, into how it was practiced."--Joan Judge, author of The Precious Raft of History: The Past, the West, and the Woman Question in China
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
This richly eloquent study of China's early-20th-century political culture stands out as a thought-provoking departure from the conventional narratives of Nationalist China, particularly the history of the newly emerging republic following the 1911 Revolution. Studying a wealth of diplomatic statements, political discourses, and other contemporary sources, Strand (politics and history, Dickinson College) refutes the traditional view that a post-1911 republic failed to become a republic in the true philosophical sense. To the contrary, argues Strand, with the Qing dynasty fallen, a new political discourse imparting the ideals of free men and women transformed the Chinese mind and awakened Chinese consciousness to the new citizenship. To make a convincing case for what he considers a significant alteration in political life, Strand credits the political performance and influence of three prominent figures: revolutionary Sun Yat-sen; Tang Qunying, a vocal suffragist who championed the people's rights; and Lu Zhengxiang, a diplomat who fought for China's equal status with the major powers in the arena of international relations. In the long run, a burgeoning sense of liberty and rights, albeit dispersed unevenly among Chinese of different social standings, spawned understandings that subsequently challenged authorities unprepared to concede to the peoples' will and interests. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. Zheng Angelo State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This richly eloquent study of China's early 20th-century political culture stands out as a thought-provoking departure from the conventional narratives of Nationalist China."-- Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In this cogent and insightful reading of China's twentieth-century political culture, David Strand argues that the Chinese Revolution of 1911 engendered a new political life--one that began to free men and women from the inequality and hierarchy that formed the spine of China's social and cultural order. Chinese citizens confronted their leaders and each other face-to-face in a stance familiar to republics worldwide. This shift in political posture was accompanied by considerable trepidation as well as excitement. Profiling three prominent political actors of the time--suffragist Tang Qunying, diplomat Lu Zhengxiang, and revolutionary Sun Yatsen--Strand demonstrates how a sea change in political performance left leaders dependent on popular support and citizens enmeshed in a political process productive of both authority and dissent. According to Kelso, the Book of Chronicles silences women in specific ways, most radically through their association with maternity. Drawing on the work of two feminist philosophers, Luce Irigaray and Michelle Boulous Walker, she argues that we may discern two principal strategies of silencing women in Chronicles: disavowal and repression of the maternal body. In its simplest form, the silencing of women takes place through both an explicit and implicit strategy of excluding them from the central action. Largely banished from the central action, they are hardly able to contribute to the production of Israels past. On a more complex level, however, women are most effectively silenced through their association with maternity, because the maternal body is both disavowed and repressed in Chronicles. The association of women with maternity, along with the disavowal and repression of the maternal body as origin of the masculine subject, effects and guarantees the silence of the feminine, enabling man to imagine himself as sole producer of his world. These strategies of silencing the feminine need to be understood in relation to the relative absence of women from the narrative world of Chronicles. Kelso argues that Chronicles depends on the absence and silence of women for its imaginary coherence. This argument is enabled by Irigarayan theory. But more importantly, Kelso suggests that Irigaray also offers us a viable mode (not method) of reading, writing, listening, and speaking as woman (whatever that might mean), in relation to the so-called origins of western culture, specifically the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. She argues that Irigaray enables a not only rigorous, feminist critique of patriarchy and its many texts, but also, somewhat more charitably, a mode of reading that enables women to read the past differently, seeking out what remains to be discovered, especially the forgotten future in the past.
Main Description
In this cogent and insightful reading of China's twentieth-century political culture, David Strand argues that the Chinese Revolution of 1911 engendered a new political life--one that began to free men and women from the inequality and hierarchy that formed the spine of China's social and cultural order. Chinese citizens confronted their leaders and each other face-to-face in a stance familiar to republics worldwide. This shift in political posture was accompanied by considerable trepidation as well as excitement. Profiling three prominent political actors of the time--suffragist Tang Qunying, diplomat Lu Zhengxiang, and revolutionary Sun Yat-sen--Strand demonstrates how a sea change in political performance left leaders dependent on popular support and citizens enmeshed in a political process productive of both authority and dissent.
Bowker Data Service Summary
David Strand argues that the Chinese revolution of 1911 engendered a new political life, one that began to free men and women from the inequality and hierarchy the formed the spine of China's social and cultural order.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction: Republican Chinap. 1
Slapping Song Jiaorenp. 13
Speaking Parts in Chinese Historyp. 52
A Woman's Republicp. 97
Seeing Like a Citizenp. 146
Losing a Speechp. 186
Sun Yat-sen's Last Wordsp. 236
Conclusion: Leading and Being Ledp. 283
Notesp. 291
Glossaryp. 343
Bibliographyp. 547
Indexp. 373
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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