Catalogue


Early modern women in conversation /
Katherine R. Larson.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xii, 218 p.
ISBN
0230298621 (alk. paper), 9780230298620 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230298621 (alk. paper)
9780230298620 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
7678910
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-204) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
In 16th and 17th century England conversation was an embodied act that held the capacity to negotiate, manipulate and transform social relationships. Early Modern Women in Conversation illuminates the extent to which gender shaped conversational interaction and demonstrates the significance of conversation as a rhetorical practice for women.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Early Modern Women in Conversation' considers how five women writers from the prominent Sidney and Cavendish families negotiated the gendered interrelationship between conversation and the spatial boundaries delimiting conversational encounters.
Description for Bookstore
This book illuminates how gender shaped conversational interaction in early modern England, demonstrating the significance of conversation as a rhetorical practice for early modern women
Long Description
To converse is, in its most fundamental sense, to engage with society. The potency of conversation as an early modern social networking tool is complicated, both by its gendered status in the period and by its conflation of verbal and physical interaction. Conversation was an embodied act that signified social intimacy, cohabitation, and even sexual intercourse. As such, conversation posed a particular challenge for women, whose virtuous reputation was contingent on sexual and verbal self-control. Early Modern Women in Conversation considers how five women writers from the prominent Sidney and Cavendish families negotiated the gendered interrelationship between conversation and the spatial boundaries delimiting conversational encounters to create opportunities for authoritative and socially transformative utterance within their texts. Conversation emerges in this book as a powerful rhetorical and creative practice that remaps women's relationship to space and language in early modern England.
Long Description
To converse is, in its most fundamental sense, to engage with society. The potency of conversation as an early modern social networking tool is complicated, however, both by its gendered status in the period and by its conflation of verbal and physical interaction. Conversation was an embodied act that signified social intimacy, cohabitation, and even sexual intercourse. As such, conversation posed a particular challenge for women, whose virtuous reputation was contingent on sexual and verbal self-control. Early Modern Women in Conversation considers how five women writers from the prominent Sidney and Cavendish families negotiated the gendered interrelationship between conversation and the spatial boundaries delimiting conversational encounters to create opportunities for authoritative and socially transformative utterance within their texts. Conversation emerges in this book as a powerful rhetorical and creative practice that remaps women's relationship to space and language in early modern England.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Note on Texts and References
Introduction
Beyond the Humanist Dialogue: The Textual Conversations of Early Modern Women
Gendering Conversation And Space In Early Modern England
'Intercourses of Friendship': Gender, Conversation, and Social Performance
Markets and Thresholds: Conversation as Spatial Practice
The Sidneys In Conversation
Speaking to God with 'a cloven tongue': The Sidney-Pembroke Psalter
Conversational Games and the Articulation of Desire in Mary Wroth's Love's Victoryand Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost
The Cavendishes In Conversation
'The language of friendship and conversation': Jane Cavendish and Elizabeth Brackley's Conversational Alliances
The Civil Conversations of Margaret Cavendish and Ben Jonson
Conclusion
Notes
Works Cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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