Catalogue


Young Thomas More and the arts of liberty /
Gerard B. Wegemer.
imprint
New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xi, 210 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521196531 (hardback), 9780521196536 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
0521196531 (hardback)
9780521196536 (hardback)
abstract
"This book analyzes Thomas More's earliest thoughts on the statecraft needed to enhance liberty and peace in a culture favoring war. It includes a close study of his little-known works - his poetry, letters, Lucian translations, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII, and life of Pico della Mirandola - as well as Richard III and Utopia"--
"What does it mean to be a free citizen in times of war and tyranny? What kind of education is needed to be a first, or leading citizen in a strife-filled country? And what does it mean to be free when freedom is forcibly opposed? These concerns pervade Thomas More's earliest writings, writings mostly unknown, including his 280 poems, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII, and his life of Pico della Mirandola, all written before Richard III and Utopia. This book analyzes those writings, guided especially by these questions: Faced with generations of civil war, what did young More see as the causes of that strife? What did he see as possible solutions? Why did More spend fourteen years after law school learning Greek and immersed in classical studies? Why do his early works use vocabulary devised by Cicero at the end of the Roman Republic?"--
catalogue key
7673769
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 191-200) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gerard B. Wegemer is professor of literature at the University of Dallas, and since 2000 he has been the founding director of the Center for Tomas More Studies.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Those who look at the More family portraits from the frames provided by this book will learn something new because Wegemer has such wisdom in discovering old facts..." -Stephen Merriam Foley,Brown University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title analyses Thomas More's earliest thoughts on the statecraft needed to enhance liberty and peace in a culture favouring war. It includes a close study of his little-known works - his poetry, letters, Lucian translations, declamation on tyrannicide, and coronation ode for Henry VIII - as well as Richard III and Utopia.
Description for Bookstore
This book analyzes Thomas More's earliest thoughts on the statecraft needed to enhance liberty and peace in a culture favoring war. It includes a close study of his little-known works – his poetry, letters, Lucian translations, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII and life of Pico della Mirandola.
Description for Bookstore
This book analyzes Thomas More's earliest thoughts on the statecraft needed to enhance liberty and peace in a culture favoring war. It includes a close study of his little-known works his poetry, letters, Lucian translations, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII and life of Pico della Mirandola.
Description for Bookstore
This book analyzes Thomas More's earliest thoughts on the statecraft needed to enhance liberty and peace in a culture favoring war. It includes a close study of his little-known works - his poetry, letters, Lucian translations, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII, and life of Pico della Mirandola - as well as Richard III and Utopia. Special attention is given to More's integration of Cicero, Seneca, and Sallust in these works and their understanding of the arts of liberty needed for a free people.
Library of Congress Summary
"This book analyzes Thomas More's earliest thoughts on the statecraft needed to enhance liberty and peace in a culture favoring war. It includes a close study of his little-known works - his poetry, letters, Lucian translations, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII, and life of Pico della Mirandola - as well as Richard III and Utopia"--"What does it mean to be a free citizen in times of war and tyranny? What kind of education is needed to be a first, or leading citizen in a strife-filled country? And what does it mean to be free when freedom is forcibly opposed? These concerns pervade Thomas More's earliest writings, writings mostly unknown, including his 280 poems, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII, and his life of Pico della Mirandola, all written before Richard III and Utopia. This book analyzes those writings, guided especially by these questions: Faced with generations of civil war, what did young More see as the causes of that strife? What did he see as possible solutions? Why did More spend fourteen years after law school learning Greek and immersed in classical studies? Why do his early works use vocabulary devised by Cicero at the end of the Roman Republic?"--
Main Description
What does it mean to be a free citizen in times of war and tyranny? What kind of education is needed to be a "first" or leading citizen in a strife-filled country? And what does it mean to be free when freedom is forcibly opposed? These concerns pervade Thomas More's earliest writings, writings mostly unknown, including his 280 poems, declamation on tyrannicide, coronation ode for Henry VIII, and his life of Pico della Mirandola, all written before Richard III and Utopia. This book analyzes those writings, guided especially by these questions: Faced with generations of civil war, what did young More see as the causes of that strife? What did he see as possible solutions? Why did More spend fourteen years after law school learning Greek and immersed in classical studies? Why do his early works use vocabulary devised by Cicero at the end of the Roman Republic?
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Young Thomas More: Why Do Peace and Prosperity: Require Arts of Humanitas?p. 1
Fashioning Peace and Prosperity: What Are the Necessary Arts?p. 23
Cicero's and More's First Citizens: How Do They Avoid Faction and Civil War?p. 35
More's Earliest Views of Humanitas, Libertas, and Respublica, 1500-1506p. 53
More's Life of Pico della Mirandola (c. 1504-1507): A Model of Libertas and Humanitas?p. 70
More's 1509 Coronation Ode: Artful Education of Eighteen-Year-Old Henry VIII?p. 88
Political Poems of 1509-1516: Proposing Self-Government by ôSound Deliberationöp. 104
Richard III: Diagnosing the Causes of England's Plague of Civil Warp. 119
Utopia: A Model Respublica of Peace, Liberty, and Self-Government?p. 139
The Un-Utopian Thomas More Family Portrait: An Icon of Morean Humanitas?p. 160
The Arts of Liberty: Can Peace and Prosperity Be Fashioned by ôSound Deliberationö?p. 176
Works Citedp. 191
Indexp. 201
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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