Catalogue


Ethiopia : the last two frontiers /
John Markakis.
imprint
Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Rochester, N.Y. : James Currey, 2011.
description
xvi, 383 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1847010334, 9781847010339
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Rochester, N.Y. : James Currey, 2011.
isbn
1847010334
9781847010339
contents note
Part 1. The Lowland Frontier. High & Low Land : A Study in Contrast -- Afar & Somali -- Borana, South Omo, Gambella & Beni Shangul Gumuz -- Part II. Building the State : The Imperial Model. Winning an Empire -- Building the Imperial State, 1916-1974 -- Imperial Rule in the Periphery -- Part III. Rebuilding the State : The Socialist Model. The 1974 Revolution -- Building the Socialist State, 1974-1991 -- The Socialist State in the Periphery -- Part IV. Rebuilding the State : The Federal Model. Building the Federal State, 1991-1995 -- Ruling the Federal State, 1995-2010 -- Part V. The Federal State in the Periphery. The Highland Periphery & the Lowland Afar -- The Somali -- Borana, South Omo, Gambella & Beni Shangul Gumuz -- Conclusion.
abstract
"Provides the gist of one scholar's knowledge of this country acquired over several decades. The author of numerous works on Ethiopia, Markakis presents here an overarching, concise historical profile of a momentous effort to integrate a multicultural empire into a modern nation state. The concept of nation state formation provides the analytical framework within which this process unfolds and the changes of direction it takes under different regimes, as well as a standard for assessing its progress and shortcomings at each stage. Over a century old, the process is still far from completion and its ultimate success is far from certain. In the author's view, there are two major obstacles that need to be overcome, two frontiers that need to be crossed to reach the desired goal. The first is the monopoly of power inherited from the empire builders and zealously guarded ever since by a ruling class of Abyssinian origin. The descendants of the people subjugated by the empire builders remain excluded from power, a handicap that breeds political instability and violent conflict. The second frontier is the arid lowlands on the margins of the state, where the process of integration has not yet reached, and where resistance to it is greatest. Until this frontier is crossed, the Ethiopian state will not have the secure borders that a mature nation state requires."--Publisher's description.
catalogue key
7673186
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 360-373) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John Markakis is a political historian who has devoted a professional lifetime to the study of Ethiopia and its neighbours in the Horn of Africa. He has published several books and many articles on this area.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
Political science professor Markakis studies the process of nation-state building in 20th- and 21st-century Ethiopia. He argues that, like most states, the Ethiopian government used aggression in the form of territorial expansion, war, and coercion to bridge the gap between the historically dominant Abyssinian core/center and the highland and lowland peripheries. Because of proximity, settlement, cultural and socioeconomic similarities, and co-option of the local elite, this effort was more successful in the sedentary highlands than in the pastoral and nomadic lowlands. From the early 20th century to the present, successive regimes of the Abyssinian center--from an absolutist and hierarchal monarchy to communist centralism to today's efforts at democratic federalism--have tried to integrate the country, forcibly employing tools such as bureaucratic centralization, land confiscation and distribution, urbanization, heavy taxation, educational modernization, and construction of a transportation and communications infrastructure. The result is not nation building but the rise of ethnic and particularistic movements that led to the severing of one piece--Eritrea--and the birth of many separatist movements. Still under the domination of the Abyssinian core, Ethiopia today struggles to build a nation through a federal system that may result in further dismemberment. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. T. Natsoulas emeritus, University of Toledo
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
An historical overview of Ethiopia's transformation from a multicultural empire into a modern nation state
Bowker Data Service Summary
The author of numerous works on Ethiopia, John Markakis provides a historical overview of the country's transformation from a multicultural empire into a modern nation state.
Main Description
Markakis presents here an overarching, concise historical profile of a momentous effort to integrate a multicultural empire into a modern nation state. The concept of nation state formation provides the analytical framework within which this process unfolds and the changes of direction it takes under different regimes, as well as a guide for assessing its progress and shortcomings at each stage.
Main Description
Provides the gist of one scholar's knowledge of this country acquired over several decades. The author of numerous works on Ethiopia, Markakis presents here an overarching, concise historical profile of a momentous effort to integrate a multicultural empire into a modern nation state. The concept of nation state formation provides the analytical framework within which this process unfolds and the changes of direction it takes under different regimes, as well as a standard for assessing its progress and shortcomings at each stage. Over a century old, the process is still far from completion and its ultimate success is far from certain. In the author's view, there are two major obstacles that need to be overcome, two frontiers that need to be crossed to reach the desired goal. The first is the monopoly of power inherited from the empire builders and zealously guarded ever since by a ruling class of Abyssinian origin. The descendants of the people subjugated by the empire builders remain excluded from power, a handicap that breeds political instability and violent conflict. The second frontier is the arid lowlands on the margins of the state, where the process of integration has not yet reached, and where resistance to it is greatest. Until this frontier is crossed, the Ethiopian state will not have the secure borders that a mature nation state requires. John Markakis is a political historian who has devoted a professional lifetime to the study of Ethiopia and its neighbors in the Horn of Africa. He has published several books and many articles on this area.
Table of Contents
List of Maps & Tablesp. ix
Prefacep. x
Acronymsp. xii
Glossaryp. xiv
Introductionp. 1
The Lowland Frontierp. 23
High & Low Land: A Study in Contrastp. 23
Afar & Somalip. 45
Borana, South Omo, Gambella & Beni Shangul Gumuzp. 65
Building the State: The Imperial Modelp. 89
Winning an Empirep. 89
Building the Imperial State 1916-1974p. 108
Imperial Rule in the Peripheryp. 131
Rebuilding the State: The Socialist Modelp. 161
The 1974 Revolutionp. 161
Building the Socialist State 1974-1991p. 182
The Socialist State in the Peripheryp. 202
Rebuilding the State: The Federal Modelp. 229
Building the Federal State1991-1995p. 229
Ruling the Federal State 1995-2010p. 255
The Federal State in the Peripheryp. 279
The Highland Periphery & the Lowland Afarp. 279
The Somalip. 306
Borana, South Omo, Gambella & Beni Shangul Gumuzp. 329
Conclusionp. 354
Selected Bibliographyp. 360
Indexp. 375
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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