Catalogue


Through the Indian mutiny : the memoirs of James Fairweather, 4th Punjab Native Infantry 1857-58 /
compiled by William Wright.
imprint
Stroud : History, 2011.
description
215 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0752461613 (hbk.), 9780752461618 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stroud : History, 2011.
isbn
0752461613 (hbk.)
9780752461618 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7672532
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In July 1855, James Fairweather passed the competition exam for the Medical Service of the Honourable East India Company and sailed for Calcutta on 10 November. He found himself at the centre of the Indian Mutiny, the assistant surgeon of a celebrated regiment of hardy North-West Frontier warriors. This book collects his memoirs.
Long Description
The new series of Spellmount Military Memoirs provides rare and sought-after texts for the collector of classic historical works, together with rigorously selected personal narratives never before in print - destined to become classics in their own right. Through the Indian Mutiny is one such text. Having passed the examination for the Medical Service of the Honourable East India Company, as an Assistant Surgeon in the celebrated regiment of North West Frontier warriors, the 4th Punjab Native infantry, James Fairweather soon found himself at the centre of the Indian Mutiny. Often used as little more than cannon fodder, these brave men fought in all the major battles of the bloody campaign - including the Storming of Delhi, the Battle of Agra and Relief of Lucknow. Of the 1,000 men in the regiment, 900 would be lost to enemy action and disease. His extraordinarily honest and dramatic memoirs have been edited and annotated by author William Wright, former Chairman of the Victorian Military Society.
Main Description
In July 1855, James Fairweather passed the competition exam for the Medical Service of the Honourable East India Company and sailed for Calcutta on 10 November, arriving there on 20 March 1856. In a few short months he found himself at the centre of the Indian Mutiny, the Assistant Surgeon of a celebrated regiment of hardy North-West Frontier warriors: the 4th Punjab Native Infantry. Often used as little more than cannon fodder, he saw these brave men fight in all the major battles of the bloody campaign, the Storming of Delhi, the Battle of Agra and the Relief of Lucknow. In Through the Indian Mutiny, Fairweather's fascinating memoirs are published for the first time, the only British officer in the regiment to come through unscathed. Written in a vivid and compelling style, he does not shy from detailing the atrocities committed by his own side, and offers a unique insight into the lives of his men, of whom 900 out of 1,000 would be lost during the Mutiny. Editor William Wright, former chairman of the Victorian Military Society, provides a thoughtful introduction and historical analysis to compliment the text.
Main Description
In July 1855, James Fairweather passed the competition exam for the Medical Service of the Honourable East India Company and sailed for Calcutta on November 10, arriving there on March 20, 1856. In a few short months he found himself at the center of the Indian Mutiny, the assistant surgeon of a celebrated regiment of hardy North-West Frontier warriors: the 4th Punjab Native Infantry. Often used as little more than cannon fodder, he saw these brave men fight in all the major battles of the bloody campaign, the Storming of Delhi, the Battle of Agra, and the Relief of Lucknow. In "Through the Indian Mutiny," Fairweathers fascinating memoirs are published for the first time, the only British officer in the regiment to come through unscathed. Written in a vivid and compelling style, he does not shy from detailing the atrocities committed by his own side, and offers a unique insight into the lives of his men, of whom 900 out of 1,000 would be lost during the Mutiny. Editor William Wright, former chairman of the Victorian Military Society, provides a thoughtful introduction and historical analysis to complement the text.
Main Description
In July 1855, James Fairweather passed the competition exam for the Medical Service of the Honourable East India Company and sailed for Calcutta on November 10, arriving there on March 20, 1856. In a few short months he found himself at the center of the Indian Mutiny, the assistant surgeon of a celebrated regiment of hardy North-West Frontier warriors: the 4th Punjab Native Infantry. Often used as little more than cannon fodder, he saw these brave men fight in all the major battles of the bloody campaign, the Storming of Delhi, the Battle of Agra, and the Relief of Lucknow. In Through the Indian Mutiny , Fairweather's fascinating memoirs are published for the first time, the only British officer in the regiment to come through unscathed. Written in a vivid and compelling style, he does not shy from detailing the atrocities committed by his own side, and offers a unique insight into the lives of his men, of whom 900 out of 1,000 would be lost during the Mutiny. Editor William Wright, former chairman of the Victorian Military Society, provides a thoughtful introduction and historical analysis to compliment the text.
Main Description
Through the Indian Mutiny

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