Catalogue


History and the making of a modern Hindu self /
Aparna Devare.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2011.
description
xiv, 236 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0415597501 (hbk.), 9780415597500 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2011.
isbn
0415597501 (hbk.)
9780415597500 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7670229
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [217]-226) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James A. Yunker is Professor of Economics at Western Illinois University (Macomb, Illinois), where he teaches, economic theory and econometrics. He is the author of Common Progress: The Case for a World Economic Equalization Program and Political Globalization: A New Vision of federal World Government. Aparna Devare is Visiting Faculty at the University of Hyderabad, and has previously taught at the American University and the George Washington University in Washington DC.
Summaries
Main Description
Taking the contentious debates surrounding historical evidence and history writing between secularists and Hindu nationalists as a starting point, this book seeks to understand the origins of a growing historical consciousness in contemporary India, especially amongst Hindus. The broad question it poses is: Why has 'history' become such an important site of identity, conflict and self-definition amongst modern Hindus, especially when Hinduism is known to have been notoriously impervious to history? As modern ideas regarding notions of history came to India with colonialism, it turns to the colonial period as the 'moment of encounter' with such ideas. The book examines three distinct moments in the Hindu self through the lives and writings of lower-caste public figure Jotiba Phule, 'moderate' nationalist M. G. Ranade and Hindu nationalist V. D. Savarkar. Through a close reading of original writings, speeches and biographical material, it is demonstrated that these three individuals were engaged with a modern historical and rationalist approach. However, the same material is also used to argue that Phule and Ranade viewed religion as living, contemporaneous and capable of informing both their personal and political lives. Savarkar, the 'explicitly Hindu' leader, on the contrary, held Hindu practices and traditions in contempt, confining them to historical analysis while denying any role for religion as spirituality or morality in contemporary political life. While providing some historical context, this volume highlights the philosophical/ political ideas and actions of the three individuals discussed. It integrates aspects of their lives as central to understanding their politics.
Main Description
The notion of a single political organization encompassing the whole of humanity - a world state-has intrigued mankind since earliest recorded history. This book provides a concise yet comprehensive overview of the history of world government and questions whether political globalization, in the form of a federal world government, could and should complement the ongoing processes of economic and cultural globalization.
Main Description
Taking the contentious debates surrounding historical evidence and history writing between secularists and Hindu nationalists as a starting point, this book seeks to understand the origins of a growing historical consciousness in contemporary India, especially amongst Hindus. The broad question it poses is: Why has history " become such an important site of identity, conflict and self-definition amongst modern Hindus, especially when Hinduism is known to have been notoriously impervious to history? As modern ideas regarding notions of history came to India with colonialism, it turns to the colonial period as the moment of encounter " with such ideas. The book examines three distinct moments in the Hindu self through the lives and writings of lower-caste public figure Jotiba Phule, moderate " nationalist M. G. Ranade and Hindu nationalist V. D. Savarkar. Through a close reading of original writings, speeches and biographical material, it is demonstrated that these three individuals were engaged with a modern historical and rationalist approach. However, the same material is also used to argue that Phule and Ranade viewed religion as living, contemporaneous and capable of informing both their personal and political lives. Savarkar, the explicitly Hindu " leader, on the contrary, held Hindu practices and traditions in contempt, confining them to historical analysis while denying any role for religion as spirituality or morality in contemporary political life. While providing some historical context, this volume highlights the philosophical/ political ideas and actions of the three individuals discussed. It integrates aspects of their lives as central to understanding their politics.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Taking the contentious debates surrounding historical evidence and history writing between secularists and Hindu nationalists as a starting point, this text seeks to understand the origins of a growing historical consciousness in contemporary India, especially amongst Hindus.
Main Description
Taking the contentious debates surrounding historical evidence and history writing between secularists and Hindu nationalists as a starting point, this book seeks to understand the origins of a growing historical consciousness in contemporary India, especially amongst Hindus. The broad question it poses is: Why has 'history' become such an important site of identity, conflict and self-definition amongst modern Hindus, especially when Hinduism is known to have been notoriously impervious to history? As modern ideas regarding notions of history came to India with colonialism, it turns to the colonial period as the 'moment of encounter' with such ideas.The book examines three distinct moments in the Hindu self through the lives and writings of lower-caste public figure Jotiba Phule, 'moderate' nationalist M. G. Ranade and Hindu nationalist V. D. Savarkar. Through a close reading of original writings, speeches and biographical material, it is demonstrated that these three individuals were engaged with a modern historical and rationalist approach. However, the same material is also used to argue that Phule and Ranade viewed religion as living, contemporaneous and capable of informing both their personal and political lives. Savarkar, the 'explicitly Hindu' leader, on the contrary, held Hindu practices and traditions in contempt, confining them to historical analysis while denying any role for religion as spirituality or morality in contemporary political life.While providing some historical context, this volume highlights the philosophical/ political ideas and actions of the three individuals discussed. It integrates aspects of their lives as central to understanding their politics.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xiv
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
List of abbreviationsp. xviii
Introductionp. 1
Historical antecedentsp. 9
From Perpetual Peace to the Great Warp. 25
From the Treaty of Versailles to the nuclear agep. 41
The postwar world government boomp. 55
The post-Cold War erap. 73
Is there a future for world government?p. 98
Notesp. 114
Select bibliographyp. 122
Indexp. 125
Glossaryp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introduction: Historicizing the Politics of Historyp. 1
Exploring the Contours of History and Religion in Colonial Indiap. 14
Phule: Historicizing Mythology รน A Rationalist Critiquep. 37
Phule: Where History Meets Its Otherp. 72
Ranade: Using a Modern Historical Gaze on India's Pastp. 93
Ranade: Dehistoricizing Religion through a Critical Textual (Re)Interpretation and a Faith-based Critiquep. 121
Savarkar: History as a Hegemonic World-viewp. 153
Savarkar: History, Hindutva and Crafting a Modern Hindu Identityp. 177
Conclusion: The Limits of Historyp. 206
Bibliographyp. 217
About the Authorp. 227
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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