Catalogue


The culture of diplomacy : Britain in Europe, c. 1750-1830 /
Jennifer Mori.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. exclsuively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xii, 244 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0719082722, 0719082722 (cloth), 9780719082726, 9780719082726 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. exclsuively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0719082722
0719082722 (cloth)
9780719082726
9780719082726 (cloth)
catalogue key
7653058
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [232]-238) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jennifer Mori is an Associate Professor in Early Modern British History at the University of Toronto
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
Foreign service underwent much change from 1750 to 1830. Earlier in the era, the diplomat's traditional duties of watching, listening, and reporting back to governmental employers required skillful maneuvering, cordiality, discernment, personal fortune, and much standing and waiting. The job was a minefield of protocol. Seating arrangements at a 1769 London court ball led to a duel between the French and Russian ambassadors, while the informality of Thomas Jefferson's presidency in the neophyte US infuriated the British ambassador when the president appeared in his dressing gown to accept that diplomat's credentials. Protocol became less rigid after the Congress of Vienna, so that the envoy's role focused less on "courtiership" or personal access to kings, and more on efforts toward conflict resolution and collective security. British ambassadors also facilitated "Grand Tourists," collected antiquities for museums at home, and sponsored intellectual endeavors. Using official and private correspondence of 50 men and women representing the British diplomatic corps during the period, including William and Emma Hamilton, Granville Leveson-Gower, James McCartney, Eliza Canning, and others, Mori (Toronto) provides a lively account of diplomacy's evolution from preferment to professionalism. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. E. J. Jenkins Arkansas Tech University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
This is not a traditional international relations text that deals with war, trade or power politics. Instead, this book offers an authoritative analysis of the social, cultural and intellectual aspects of diplomatic life in the age of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It authoritatively illustrates several modes of Britain#146;s engagement with Europe, whether political, artistic, scientific, literary or cultural. Mori consults an impressively wide range of sources for this study including the private and official papers of 50 men and women in the British diplomatic service. Attention is given to topics rarely covered in diplomatic history such as the work and experiences of women and issues of national, regional and European identity This book will be essential reading for students and lecturers of the history of International Relations and will offer a fascinating insight in to the world of diplomatic relations to all those with an interest in British and European history.
Main Description
This is not a traditional international relations text that deals with war, trade or power politics. Instead, this book offers an authoritative analysis of the social, cultural and intellectual aspects of diplomatic life in the age of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It authoritatively illustrates several modes of Britain's engagement with Europe, whether political, artistic, scientific, literary or cultural. Mori consults an impressively wide range of sources for this study including the private and official papers of 50 men and women in the British diplomatic service. Attention is given to topics rarely covered in diplomatic history such as the work and experiences of women and issues of national, regional and European identity. This book will be essential reading for students and lecturers of the history of International Relations and will offer a fascinating insight in to the world of diplomatic relations to all those with an interest in British and European history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title offers an authoritative analysis of the social, cultural and intellectual aspects of diplomatic life in the age of Enlightenment and the French Revolution. It illustrates several modes of Britain's engagement with Europe, whether political, artistic, scientific, literary or cultural.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Abbreviationsp. viii
Introduction: More new diplomatic historyp. 1
The structure of a servicep. 17
Why diplomacy?p. 21
Entrance, training and promotionp. 41
Family, sex and marriagep. 62
Of cabbages and kingsp. 87
Etiquette and 'face'p. 91
Favourites and flunkeysp. 106
Gossips, networks and newsp. 124
Beyond the call of dutyp. 149
The Grand Tourp. 151
From ancients to modernsp. 167
War, ethnography and religionp. 188
Conclusion: Diplomacy transformed?p. 211
Male diplomats, 1750-1830p. 219
Female diplomats, 1750-1830p. 227
Select primary source bibliographyp. 232
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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