Catalogue


Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats : unfinished business /
Matt Cole.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2011.
description
xv, 233 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719082536 (cloth), 9780719082535 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2011.
isbn
0719082536 (cloth)
9780719082535 (cloth)
catalogue key
7651672
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 222-226) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Matt Cole is a Visiting Fellow of the Hansard Society and Head of Modern History and Politics at King Edward VI College in Stourbridge
Reviews
Review Quotes
The result is an occasionally curious but often revealing study of Liberal politics in the middle and late twentieth century.
Biography of this high quality reminds us that it is often the middle-ranking political outsider, rather than the party big-wig in London that can provide the best insight into a grassroots organisation.
... Cole examines how Wainwright cultivated the local press and re-energised his constituency's Liberal clubs as part of his bid to enter parliament.
Cole has written a gem of biography, exploring the forgotten nooks and crannies of a political figure who played a pivotal role in the survival and subsequent revival of the Liberal party in the North of England.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats: Unfinished Business offers new research on familiar themes involving loyalties of politics, faith and locality. Richard Wainwright was a Liberal MP for seventeen years during the Party's recovery, but his life tells us about much more than this. Wainwright grew up in prosperity, but learned from voluntary work about poverty; he refused to fight in World War Two, but saw war at its cruellest; he joined the Liberal Party when most had given up on it, but gave his fortune to it; lost a by-election but caused the only Labour loss in Harold Wilson's landslide of 1966. He then played a key role in the fall of Jeremy Thorpe, the Lib-Lab Pact and the formation of the SDP-Liberal Alliance and the Liberal Democrats; he represented a unique Yorkshire constituency which reflected his pride and hope for society; and though he gave his life to the battle to be in the Commons, he refused a seat in the Lords. Richard Wainwright's story is central to the story of the Liberal Party and sheds light on the reasons for its survival and the state of its prospects. At the same time this book is a parable of politics for anyone who wants to represent an apparently lost cause, who want to motivate people who have been neglected, and who wants to follow their convictions at the highest level.
Main Description
Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats: Unfinished Business offers new research on familiar themes involving loyalties of politics, faith and locality.Richard Wainwright was a Liberal MP for seventeen years during the Party’s recovery but his life tells us about much more than this. Wainwright grew up in prosperity, but learned from voluntary work about poverty; he refused to fight in World War Two, but saw war at its cruellest; he joined the Liberal Party when most had given up on it, but gave his fortune to it; lost a by-election but caused the only Labour loss in Harold Wilson’s landslide of 1966. He then played a key role in the fall of Jeremy Thorpe, the Lib-Lab Pact and the formation of the SDP-Liberal Alliance and the Liberal Democrats; he represented a unique Yorkshire constituency which reflected his pride and hope for society; and though he gave his life to the battle to be in the Commons, but refused a seat in the Lords.Richard Wainwright’s story is central to the story of the Liberal Party and sheds light on the reasons for its survival and the state of its prospects. At the same time it is a parable of politics for anyone who wants to represent an apparently lost cause, who wants to motivate people who have been neglected, and who wants to follow their convictions at the highest level.
Main Description
Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats: Unfinished Business offers new research on familiar themes involving loyalties of politics, faith and locality.Richard Wainwright was a Liberal MP for seventeen years during the Party’s recovery but his life tells us about much more than this. Wainwright grew up in prosperity, but learned from voluntary work about poverty; he refused to fight in World War Two, but saw war at its cruellest; he joined the Liberal Party when most had given up on it, but gave his fortune to it; lost a by-election but caused the only Labour loss in Harold Wilson’s landslide of 1966. He then played a key role in the fall of Jeremy Thorpe, the Lib-Lab Pact and the formation of the SDP-Liberal Alliance and the Liberal Democrats; he represented a unique Yorkshire constituency which reflected his pride and hope for society; and though he gave his life to the battle to be in the Commons, but refused a seat in the Lords.Richard Wainwright’s story is central to the story of the Liberal Party and sheds light on the reasons for its survival and the state of its prospects. At the same time it is a parable of politics for anyone who wants to represent an apparently lost cause, who wants to motivate people who have been neglected, and who wants to follow their convictions at the highest level.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text offers research on familiar themes involving loyalties of politics, faith and locality. Richard Wainwright was a Liberal MP for 17 years during the Party's recovery, but his life tells us about much more than this about the 20th century.
Main Description
Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats: unfinished business offers new research on familiar themes involving loyalties of politics, faith and locality. Richard Wainwright was a Liberal MP for seventeen years during the Party's recovery, but his life tells us about much more than this. Wainwright grew up in prosperity, but campaigned against poverty; he refused to fight in World War Two, but saw war at its cruellest; he joined the Liberal Party when most had given up on it, and gave his fortune to it; lost a by-election but caused the only Labour loss in a Labour landslide. He played key roles in the fall of Jeremy Thorpe, the Lib-Lab Pact and the formation of the SDP-Liberal Alliance and the Liberal Democrats; he travelled the world but represented a unique Yorkshire constituency which reflected his pride and hope for society; and whilst he gave his life to the battle to be in the Commons, he refused a seat in the Lords. Richard Wainwright is central to the story of the Liberal Party and sheds light on the reasons for its survival and the state of its prospects as the Liberal Democrat Party. At the same time this book is a parable of politics for anyone who wants to represent an apparently lost cause, who wants to motivate people who have been neglected, and who wants to follow their convictions at the highest level. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Chronologyp. xiv
Introductionp. 1
Before Parliament
Early lifep. 5
Cambridgep. 16
Wainwright's Warp. 26
Outside Parliament
Liberal Clubsp. 43
Wainwright's faithp. 51
The pressp. 61
The Party in the countryp. 67
Colne Valleyp. 80
Campaigningp. 96
In Parliament
The Parliamentary Liberal Partyp. 141
Wainwright and Jeremy Thorpep. 156
The Lib-Lab Pactp. 177
The SDP/Liberal Alliancep. 185
After Parliament
The merger and the Liberal Democratsp. 195
Conclusionp. 210
Appendicesp. 219
Bibliographyp. 222
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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