Catalogue


Diseased relations : epidemics, public health, and state-building in Yucatán, Mexico, 1847-1924 /
Heather McCrea.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2010.
description
xiv, 288 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
082634898X (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780826348982 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2010.
isbn
082634898X (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780826348982 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
The politics of prevention : the Maya, smallpox, and vaccination campaigns -- On sacred ground : cholera, burial rites, and cemetery management -- Cholera and the caste war : civilizing campaigns and disease prevention -- Modernizing the periphery : henequen, the caste war, and yellow fever -- Disease prevention, the Rockefeller Foundation, and revolution in Yucatán, 1915-24.
catalogue key
7651661
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Heather McCrea is assistant professor of history at Kansas State University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
This study examines the politics of postcolonial state-building through the lens of disease and public health policy in order to trace how indigenous groups on the periphery of power and geography helped shape the political practices and institutions of modern Mexico.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the tropical region of 19th-century Yucatan, disease was plentiful. To combat this, governmental medicinal plans were put in place, but the campaign became a negative symbol of control over the individual. This book looks at the politics of post-colonial state building through the lens of disease and public health policy.
Main Description
The politics of post-colonial state building through the lens of disease and public health policy. In the tropical region of Yucatan diseases were plentiful and epidemics touched upon every aspect of life. To combat this, governmental medicinal plans and legislation were put into place, but public health campaigns became negative symbols of control over the individual and were fought by various Mayan groups.
Main Description
Throughout recorded history, epidemics have touched every aspect of life, including commerce, travel, agriculture, religious ritual, education, and political campaigns. In the tropical region of Yucatán, Mexico, which hosted a plethora of diseases, the violent resistance of various Mayan groups to state exploitation created one of the least understood but most significant threats to Mexican rule since the Conquest. As protection of one's own health--as well as control over individual and collective bodies--came to be ingrained in the imagined community that elites sought to construct, public health campaigns became symbols of modernization and an extension of the state's efforts to remake "clean" citizens out of what some perceived as the filthy, the disorderly, and the rebellious. Their medical plans and legislation, however, often ran counter to long-practiced rituals of burial, mourning, food preparation, and sick care in the region. This study examines the politics of postcolonial state-building through the lens of disease and public health policy in order to trace how indigenous groups on the periphery of power and geography helped shape the political practices and institutions of modern Mexico. Placing Yucatán at the center of an international labor force, global economics (due to the henequen boom), and a modernizing medical establishment, Heather McCrea incorporates the region into a larger discussion about socioeconomic change and the pervasive role that health care, or lack thereof, plays in human society.
Main Description
This book examines the construction of modern Mexico through the lens of public health and disease. Nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Mexicans endured crushing epidemics, especially in tropical Yucatán, while the political and social order around them changed drastically. As federal and state governments took on more and more responsibility for public health policies, government was extending its reach into the private sphere. The Yucatán state in this period was intent on regulating the system of raising and selling foodstuffs, creating a system of mass vaccinations, eradicating pests, and controlling drinking water, all in the name of the welfare of the people. In a peripheral state like Yucatán, with its mostly rural, indigenous Maya population and its small creole elite, public health issues were thus folded into a larger ideology, pitting ôcivilizationö against ôbarbarismö in order to make ôcleanö citizens out of what some perceived as the filthy, the disorderly, and the rebellious. Medical plans and legislation, however, often ran counter to long-practiced rituals of burial, mourning, food preparation, and care of the sick.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Region, Ethnography, and Medicine in Yucatán, Mexicop. 1
The Politics of Prevention: The Maya, Smallpox, and Vaccination Campaignsp. 21
On Sacred Ground: Cholera, Burial Rites, and Cemetery Managementp. 59
Cholera and the Caste War: Civilizing Campaigns and Disease Preventionp. 95
Modernizing the Periphery: Henequen, the Caste War, and Yellow Feverp. 133
Disease Prevention, the Rockefeller Foundation, and Revolution in Yucatán, 1915-1924p. 163
Conclusion: Outsiders, Disease, and Public Health in Modern Yucatán, Mexicop. 191
Afterword: H1N1 and the Legacy of Uncertaintyp. 201
Notesp. 207
Bibliographyp. 251
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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